Pulmonary consumption ... successfully treated by medical inhalations

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Page 102 - Why, look you now, how unworthy a thing you make of me ! You would play upon me ; you would seem to know my stops ; you would pluck out the heart of my mystery ; you would sound me from my lowest note to the top of my compass : and there is much music, excellent voice, in this little organ ; yet cannot you make it speak. 'Sblood, do you think I am easier to be played on than a pipe ? Call me what instrument you will, though you can fret me, you cannot play upon me.
Page 48 - Every person accustomed to the sick must have heard them deplore their ignorance of the necessary consequences of those practices by which their health has been destroyed : and when men shall be deeply convinced that the eternal laws of nature have connected pain and decrepitude with one mode of life, and health and vigour with another, they will avoid the former and adhere to the latter. It is strange, however, to observe, that the generality of mankind do not seem to bestow a single thought on...
Page 39 - Such severe dyspnoea, so long continued, without expectoration, would probably have determined his diagnosis to hydrothorax. But what was the disease ? Every part of the chest sounded well to percussion. The heart beat regularly, and with a natural sound, only with too great frequency. What could it be ? There reached the ear from every part of the chest to which it was applied a loud sibilus. The disease was an inflammation largely diffused through all, perhaps, of the bronchial passages, great...
Page 23 - The most important thing for a student to impress on his mind with regard to all cases of phthisis is, that the pectoral symptoms, of whatsoever nature they may be, are caused by scrofulous inflammation. If you trace the phenomena of external scrofulous abscesses, you will be struck with the close analogy they bear, in their manner of appearance, their progress, and termination, to the ulcerations of the lungs in phthisis. The same slowness, the same insidious latency, the same gradual solidification...
Page 21 - The introduction of infinitely small doses, when compared at least with the quantities formerly prescribed, is gradually creeping in. The history of medicine affords abundant proofs of the acrimony, nay, the fury, with which every new doctrine has been impugned and insulted. The same annals will also show that this spirit of intolerance has always been in the ratio of the truths that these doctrines tended to bring into light. From the preceding observations, no one can accuse me of having become...
Page 36 - It ought never to be employed in the treatment of consumption except to remove inflammation or active determinations of blood, with which the disease may be complicated; beyond this its operation can only tend to a useless loss of strength.
Page 23 - ... the analogous occurrence of burrowing ulcers and fistulous openings, the close approximation in the form of their parietes, and the difficulty in healing remarked in both, make the resemblance between them extremely striking. Compare scrofulous inflammation of the hip or knee-joint...
Page 87 - the body and the mind are like a jerkin and a jerkin's lining — rumple the one and you rumple the other.
Page 6 - pathological anatomy has perhaps never afforded more conclusive evidence in proof of the curability of a disease than it has in that of tubercular phthisis.
Page 41 - The cure of consumption, when the lungs are not completely disorganized, ought not to be looked upon as at all impossible in reference either to the nature of the disease or the organs affected. The destruction of a part of the substance of the lungs is by no means necessarily mortal.

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