The Critical Review: Or, Annals of Literature, Volume 70; Volume 1790

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Tobias Smollett
R[ichard]. Baldwin, at the Rose in Pater-noster-Row, 1790 - Books
 

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Page 106 - I have known both hunger and nakedness to the utmost extremity of human suffering. I have known what it is to have food given me as charity to a madman ; and I have at times been obliged to shelter myself under the miseries of that character, to avoid a heavier calamity. My distresses have been greater than I have ever owned, or ever will own, to any man. Such evils are terrible to bear ; but they never yet had power to turn me from my purpose. If I live, I will faithfully perform, in its utmost...
Page 107 - I have always remarked that women in all countries are civil, obliging, tender, and humane; that they are ever inclined to be gay and cheerful, timorous and modest; and that they do not hesitate, like men, to perform a generous action. Not haughty, not arrogant...
Page 256 - A large broad fillet was bound upon their forehead, and tied behind their head. In the middle of this was a horn, or a conical piece of silver, gilt, about four inches long, much in the shape of our common candle extinguishers. This is called kirn, or horn, and is only worn in reviews or parades after victory.
Page 404 - His left hand is employed grasping the sword by the handle ; about fourteen inches of the blade is covered with whipcord. This part he takes in his right hand, without any danger of being hurt by it ; and, though the edges of the lower part of the sword are as sharp as a razor, he carries it without a scabbard.
Page 484 - I have lived long enough : my way of life Is fall'n into the sear, the yellow leaf ; And that which should accompany old age, As honour, love, obedience, troops of friends, I must not look to have ; but, in their stead, Curses, not loud but deep, mouth-honour, breath, Which the poor heart would fain deny, and dare not.
Page 418 - ... fawningly against the breast of a man, who had attracted his notice among the crowd, and delivered the book to him. The dog immediately returned to the place where he had landed, and watched with great attention for all the things that came from the wrecked vessel, seizing • them, and endeavouring to bring them to land.
Page 423 - It has been the chief aim of all my attempts to reconcile and endear man to man: I love my country and contemporaries to a degree of...
Page 256 - I observed, was the head-dress of the governors of provinces. A large broad fillet was bound upon their forehead, and tied behind their head. In the middle of this was a horn, or a conical piece of silver, gilt, about four inches long, much in the shape of our common candle extinguishers.
Page 485 - ... could trust in as a friend, and could love as a brother: This is the man, whom in your heart above all others, you do, you must, honour. SUCH a character, imperfectly as it has now been drawn, all must acknowledge to be formed solely by the influence of steady religion and virtue. It is...
Page 521 - is almost the only lawful king in the world, because the only one who owes his crown to the choice of his people.

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