The Works of the British Poets: Savage, R., Poetical works. Dyer, J., Poetical works

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Mitchell, Ames, and White, 1819 - English poetry
 

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Page 261 - And ancient towers crown his brow, That cast an awful look below; Whose ragged walls the ivy creeps, And with her arms from falling keeps; So both a safety from the wind On mutual dependence find. 'Tis now the raven's bleak abode; 'Tis now th...
Page 259 - While the yellow linnet sings : Or the tuneful nightingale Charms the forest with her tale ; Come with all thy various hues, Come, and aid thy sister Muse. Now, while Phoebus riding high, Gives lustre to the land and sky, Grongar Hill invites my song, Draw the landscape bright and strong.
Page 263 - Hope's deluding glass; As yon summits soft and fair Clad in colours of the air, Which to those who journey near, Barren, brown, and rough appear; Still we tread the same coarse way; The present's still a cloudy day.
Page 259 - Silent Nymph ! with curious eye Who, the purple evening, lie On the mountain's lonely van. Beyond the noise of busy man, Painting fair the form of things, While the yellow linnet sings, Or the tuneful nightingale Charms the forest with her tale...
Page 263 - I lie; While the wanton zephyr sings, And in the vale perfumes his wings ; While the waters murmur deep ; While the shepherd charms his sheep ; While the birds unbounded fly, And with music fill the sky, Now, ev'n now, my joys run high.
Page 288 - And ease and luxury ! O luxury ! Bane of elated life, of affluent states, What dreary change, what ruin is not thine ! How doth thy bowl intoxicate the mind ! To the soft entrance of thy rosy cave, How dost thou lure the fortunate and great ! Dreadful attraction ! while behind thee gapes Th...
Page 260 - While strayed my eyes o'er Towy's flood, Over mead and over wood, From house to house, from hill to hill, Till Contemplation had her fill. About his...
Page 4 - That affluence and power, advantages extrinsick and adventitious, and therefore easily separable from those by whom they are possessed, should very often flatter the mind with expectations of felicity which they cannot give, raises no astonishment: but it seems rational to hope that intellectual greatness should produce better effects; that minds qualified for great attainments should first endeavour their own benefit; and that they who are most able to teach others the way to happiness should with...
Page 380 - Enlarge the brightening sky, and, peopling, warm The opening valleys and the yellowing plains ? Or, rather, shall we burst strong Darien's chain, Steer our bold fleets between the cloven rocks, And through the great Pacific every joy Of civil life diffuse ? Are not her isles Numerous and large ? have they not harbours calm , Inhabitants, and manners...

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