A Practical Treatise on Making and Repairing Roads

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J. Weale, 1844 - Roads - 306 pages
 

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Page 1 - Good roads, canals, and navigable rivers, by diminishing the expense of carriage, put the remote parts of the country more nearly upon a level with those in the neighbourhood of the town. They are upon that account the greatest of all improvements. They encourage the cultivation of the remote, which must always be the most extensive circle of the country. They are advantageous to the town, by breaking down the monopoly of the country in its neighbourhood. They are advantageous even to that part of...
Page 295 - ... the owner is not painted, or without a double rein as aforesaid, it shall and may be lawful for any magistrate, constable, or turnpike keeper to stop and detain such offender, and the vehicle and animal or animals on which or with which such offender shall be, and forthwith to carry or convey such offender before any justice of the peace for the county where such offence shall be committed...
Page 298 - ... on any public road or within thirty feet of the centre thereof, save within any house or...
Page 216 - ... that the extent of surface swept is the same, although not the extent of streets, arising from the more or less frequency of sweeping over the same surface ; so that by cleansing the streets with Whitworth's street-sweeping machine, three times a week, the quantity of mud produced on the surface is five times less, than when they were swept by hand, twice in three weeks, and thirteen times less than when swept but once a week. The losses caused by the dust and dirt in the streets are stated to...
Page 16 - Sweden wind agreeably through the country, are made with ftone or gravel, and are as good as our turnpikes in England -, and yet not a fingle toll is exacted from the traveller. Each landholder is obliged to keep in repair a certain part of the road in proportion to his property ; and, for the...
Page 96 - To follow the mathematical axiom, that a straight line is the shortest that can be drawn between two points, will not succeed in making the most commodious roads; hills must be avoided, towns must be resorted to, and the sudden bends of rivers must be shunned...
Page 295 - ... sale to the owner or owners, on demand ; one half of the amount of the penalties so levied to be paid to the informer, and the remaining half to the minister or curate of the parish in which such offence shall be committed, for the use of the poor of such parish ; and if distress sufficient for such penalty or penalties shall not have been seized or...
Page 299 - ... or to remove any way or passage from any road into any adjoining land or to any house which may obstruct the free passage of the water...
Page 301 - ... every person so offending shall forfeit and pay for every such offence, upon conviction by the oath of one credible witness before any two justices of the peace...
Page 33 - In order to keep the ancient line of road has been so pertinaciously adhered to, that roads have been sunk many feet, and in some parts many yards, below the surface of the adjacent ground; so that the stag, the hounds, and horsemen, have been known to leap over a loaded waggon, in a hollow way, without any obstruction from the vehicle.

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