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KINDERGARTENS-PRIV.

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Kindergartens in the United States, Number

pupils for certain

Yedrs.

1873. 1880. 1887 1892 1898 1902.

Statistics of kindergartens were first colle 1873, and the work has been continued at int Report of the Commissioner for 1902 shows t tion of 4,000 maintain kindergartens as a par there being 2,202 kindergartens in these cities of 3,244 public and private kindergartens. ing of this important branch of education, t dergartens having been increased by 100 in

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Private and public se

Elemen

schoo

Public

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North Atlantic States South Atlantic States South Central States North Central States Western States

W.2 95.4 85.1 3.2 94.9

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KINDERGARTENS- PRIVATE SCHOOLS.

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Kindergartens in the United States-Number of schools, of teachers, and of

pupils for certain years.

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Statistics of kindergartens were first collected by the Bureau of Education in 1873, and the work has been continued at intervals since that time. The Annual Report of the Commissioner for 1902 shows that 289 cities of a minimum population of 4,000 maintain kindergartens as a part of the regular public school system, there being 2,202 kindergartens in these cities. The table given here shows a total of 3,244 public and private kindergartens. The tendency is toward public fostering of this important branch of education, the number of cities maintaining kindergartens having been increased by 100 in the last four years.

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The comparison of the attendance in the public schools with the corresponding item in the private schools indicates that as between the three grades of education the elementary branch is almost entirely under public control, secondary education is three-fourths public and one-fourth private, and in the higher institutions the attendance in institutions under private control is nearly 50 per cent greater than in similar institutions under public control. These observations apply with a fair degree of uniformity throughout the entire ccuntry in elementary education and in higher institutions with the exception of the North Central and the Western States. The figures relating to secondary schools show that the North Atlantic and Western States vary very little from the average of the whole country. The greatest variation from the average is in the Southern States, where possibly secondary education as a measure of public polity has not received as full sanction as in some other sections.

ED 1903-74

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EDUCATION IN

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Appropriation by United States Congress f

Education and for the introducti

Year.

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1894. 1886-87 1887-88 1888-89 1889-90 1890-91 1891-92 1892-93. 1893-94. 1894-95

$25,000

15,000 25,000 40,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 40,000 30,000 30,000

$6,000 7,500

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In addition to the 33 Government schEducation, 12 mission schools and 8 loc Alaska. The Bureau has not been suc these schools owing to the difficulty o with fair accuracy that about 3,600 st in the Territory of Alaska.

In addition to the students reported students are maintained at present ou Indian School

EDUCATION IN ALASKA.

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Appropriation by United States Congress for schools controlled by the Bureau of

Education and for the introduction of reindeer into Alaska,

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Enrollment of children in schools of Alaska controlled by the Bureau of Education.

Year.

Enroll-
mont.

Year.

Enrollment.

794

1893 1894 1895 1896 1897

807
1,030
1,197
1,395

1898.
1899
1900.
1901.
1902.

1,250
1,369
1,723
1,681
1,791

In addition to the 33 Government schools under the direction of the Bureau of Education, 12 mission schools and 8 local systems of schools are maintained in Alaska. The Bureau has not been successful in obtaining reliable statistics of these schools owing to the difficulty of communication, but it may be estimated with fair accuracy that about 3,600 students are enrolled in all classes of schools in the Territory of Alaska.

In addition to the students reported as enrolled in the local schools about 100 students are maintained at present out of the Alaska appropriation at the Carlisle Indian School.

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ORGANIZATION OF TE

The working force of the Bureau administrative divisions or sections,

(1) The Commissioner of Educatio:

(2) The division of statistics, the clerks under the statistician. Its do statistics of education in the United correspondence of the Bureau.

(3) The division of correspondenc direction of the chief clerk. Its duti of the Bureau, address the labels fo index all letters received and letters

(4) The division of editorial work to prepare all matter issued by the E and to read proof. Included in this d in foreign educational systems.

(5) The library and museum divi librarian, an assistant, and 3 clerks. tion with the Bureau's comprehensi duty of the systematic filing of educa

(6) Through the United States ag the Bureau has established and man the domestic reindeer of Siberia as a supply for the natives, and a means in 1903.

(7) The laborers, numbering 7, details of office work.

PUBLICATIONS OF T

The publications of the Bureau co

First. An annual report, containin ing the educational systems of the S colleges; professional, special, and schools, and kindergartens, with a s eign countries.

Second. Special reports on subject

Third. Circulars of information or history, which are issued in yearly s

Fourth. Occasional bulletins on m

(a) Thirty-three annual reports, compri the year 1902-3) is in preparation.

(b) Twenty-five special reports bare be

(c) One hundred and twenty-five circula plete in manuscript.

(d) One hundred bulletins and other min

A request for publications from indorsed by a Senator or Represer schools.

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