Model First[-fourth] Reader ...

Front Cover

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Noblest Courage is the Courage to Do Right
30
Waiting for Something to Turn Up Alice Cary
32
The Owl
33
Making Tracks
35
Nells Chickens L G Warner
36
Perseverance Wins
38
Capt William Haverly subject concluded
40
The Monkey Family
42
The Prize Medal S Anna Frost
44
The Crow and the Fox
46
How does the Stone get into old Teakettles ?
47
The Bird of Paradise Harpers Magazine
51
Wink Christian Union
54
FireScreens Lucy J Rider
55
Alphabet of Proverbs
59
The Dogs Revenge Olive Thorne
61
The Dogs Revenge concluded
63
Wonders of the Sea
64
A Winter Night Louise V Boyd
65
The Carrying Trade Our Young Folks
67
The Carrying Trade concluded CG
69
The Two Brothers
215
Position in Reading
227
Precepts
310
Sir Matthew Hale
311
A Fable
312
Theodore Parker
313
Better than Gold Alexander Smart
315
Home A Mothers Love
316
Albert Barnes
318
Charcoals Story Happy Hours
322
Sponge Manual of Commerce
323
Small Beginnings not to be Despised
326
An April Day Geoffrey Chaucer
329
Death of Alexander Hamilton Pres Nott
330
The Grave of Aaron Burr
332
Ring Out Wild Bells Alfred Tennyson
334
An Army of Monkeys Lieut Reid
335
Enthusiasm Necessary to Success Prof W Mathews
338
Spring Mary Howitt
339
God only can Satisfy our Affections W E Channing
340
Paper
341
The Winds
344
Hannah F Gould
345
A Curtain Lecture of Mrs Caudle Douglas Jerrold
346
Educated Observers Hearth and Home
349
Longing
351
James Russell Lowell
352
Horace Mann
353
WaterSpouts
354
Solitude William Cowper
355
Nothing Lives for Itself Alone John Todd
357
The Stranger on the Sill T B Read
360
Death of Absalom Bible Willis
376
Macaroni and Vermicelli Samuel Woodworth
379
Oratory as an Art Sheridan Knowles
381
Passing Away John Pierpont
383
Choice Extracts Pope Blair and others
385
The Bell of Justice poetry by Longfellow
387
The Speech of Brutus Shakespeare
389
Antonys Oration over Cęsars Body Shakespeare
390
Selling Old Things Century
393
Tells Address to the Mountains Sheridan Knowles
395
The Authors of our Liberty Geo H Curtis
396
Give me Liberty or give me Death Patrick Henry
398
Imagined Speech of John Adams Daniel Webster
402
Independence Bell 1776
405
The First Declaration of Independence
413
The American Flag Joseph R Drake
414
The National Flag Charles Summer
416
The Star Spangled Banner F S Key
417
Emigration for our Interest Patrick Henry
419
Love of Country a Cardinal Virtue Sir W Scott
421
Progress of Mind Sidney Dyer
422
SelfCulture E H Chapin adapted
423
Transition
425
Our Wondrous Atmosphere
426
Typography Origin and Progress J W Russell
428
Song of the Railroad
432
Chas T Wolfe
433
The Ship and the SeaGull British Workman
435
A Storm on the Ocean Archbishop Hughes
437
An Incident of the Sea Washington Irving
440
The Ship City of Boston Will Carleton
441
The Time to Work Henry T Miller
443
Battle of Waterloo Lord Byron
445
Death of Little Paul Charles Dickens
447
There are no Dead
450
Sir Edward Bulwer
451
George P Morris
452
Rienzis Address to the Romans Miss Mitford
453
The Church Bell Cardinal Wiseman
455
Grattans Reply to Corry
456
Three Grains of Corn Miss Edwards
458
Room at the
460
J G Holland
462
Religious Liberty
463
Daniel OConnell
464
George W Cutler
466
Cover Them Over Will Carleton
467
The Future of the Republic Judge Story
470
Curfew shall not Toll Tonight Rosa Hartwick
472
Universal Education
475
Horace Greeley
478
A Summer Night Philip James Bailey
482

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 397 - I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided ; and that is the lamp of experience. I know of no way of judging of the future but by the past.
Page 399 - Besides, sir, we have no election. If we were base enough to desire it, it is now too late to retire from the contest. There is no retreat but in submission and slavery ! Our chains are forged ; their clanking may be heard on the plains of Boston! The war is inevitable — and let it come! I repeat it, sir, let it come! It is in vain, sir, to extenuate the matter. Gentlemen may cry, Peace, peace; but there is no peace.
Page 389 - Here comes his body, mourned by Mark Antony : who, though he had no hand in his death, shall receive the benefit of his dying, a place in the commonwealth ; as which of you shall not ? With this I depart ; that, as I slew my best lover for the good of Rome, I have the same dagger for myself, when it shall please my country to need my death.
Page 311 - Reaper Behold her, single in the field, Yon solitary Highland Lass! Reaping and singing by herself; Stop here, or gently pass! Alone she cuts and binds the grain, And sings a melancholy strain; O listen! for the Vale profound Is overflowing with the sound.
Page 399 - Sir, we are not weak, if we make a proper use of those means which the God of nature hath placed in our power. Three millions of people, armed in the holy cause of liberty, and in such a country as that which we possess, are invincible by any force which our enemy can send against us.
Page 413 - Flag of the free heart's hope and home, By angel hands to valor given ! Thy stars have lit the welkin dome, And all thy hues were born in heaven. Forever float that standard sheet ! Where breathes the foe but falls before us, With Freedom's soil beneath our feet, And Freedom's banner streaming o'er us ? JOSEPH RODMAN DRAKE.
Page 444 - And there was mounting in hot haste: the steed, The mustering squadron, and the clattering car, Went pouring forward with impetuous speed, And swiftly forming in the ranks of war...
Page 370 - My conscience hath a thousand several tongues, And every tongue brings in a several tale, And every tale condemns me for a villain. Perjury, perjury, in the high'st degree; Murder, stern murder in the dir'st degree; All several sins, all us'd in each degree, Throng to the bar, crying all, 'Guilty, guilty!
Page 397 - Are we disposed to be of the number of those, who, having eyes, see not, and having ears, hear not, the things which so nearly concern their temporal salvation? For my part, whatever anguish of spirit it may cost, I am willing to know the whole truth; to know the worst, and to provide for it.
Page 478 - Written on thy works I read The lesson of thy own eternity. Lo ! all grow old and die — but see, again, How on the faltering footsteps of decay Youth presses — ever gay and beautiful youth In all its beautiful forms. These lofty trees Wave not less proudly that their ancestors Moulder beneath them.

Bibliographic information