The Emotions and the Will

Front Cover
Parker, 1859 - Consciousness - 649 pages
The present publication is a sequel to my former one, on the Senses and the Intellect, and completes a Systematic Exposition of the Human Mind. The generally admitted but vaguely conceived doctrine of the connection between mind and body has been throughout discussed definitely. In treating of the Emotions, I include whatever is known of the physical embodiment of each. The Natural History Method, adopted in delineating the Sensations, is continued in the Treatise on the Emotions. The first chapter is devoted to Emotion in general; after which the individual kinds are classified and discussed; separate chapters being assigned to the Aesthetic Emotions, arising on the contemplation of Beauty in Nature and Art, and to the Ethical, or the Moral Sentiment. Under this last head, I have gone fully into the Theory of Moral Obligation. It has been too much the practice to make the discussion of the Will comprise only the single metaphysical problem of Liberty and Necessity. Departing from this narrow usage, I have sought to ascertain the nature of the faculty itself, its early germs, or foundations in the human constitution, and the course of its development, from its feeblest indications in infancy to the maturity of its power. Five chapters are occupied with this investigation; and five more with subjects falling under the domain of the Will, including the Conflict of Motives, Deliberation, Resolution, Effort, Desire, Moral Habits, Duty, and Moral Inability. A closing chapter embraces the Free-will controversy. As in my view, Belief is essentially related to the active part of our being, I have reserved the consideration of it to the conclusion of the Treatise on the Will. The final dissertation of the work is on Consciousness. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved).
 

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Contents

Circumstances that promote imitation
11
Stimulus of a Sensation
15
Bearing of education or culture on the emotions of self 142
19
CHARACTERS OF EMOTIONS
22
Differences in the conscious mode or feeling proper
31
Intellectual characters of Emotion
37
falsehood
46
CHAPTER II
56
CHAPTER V
73
Influence on Belief
80
Species of Terror Timidity of the Lower Animals 8 Slavish Terror 7 Fear in Children 9 Forebodings of Disaster and Misfortune 10 Anxiety
83
Suspicion 12 Panic
84
Superstition
85
Fear of Death
86
Distrust of our Faculties in unfamiliar operations
87
The being A bashed by the human presence 17 Counteractives of Terror
89
Instrumentality of Terror in Government and Education 19 Use of the passion in Art
91
The Eleusinian Mysteries Note
92
TENDER EMOTION
94
Diffusive action or Expression
100
The power of sustaining volition in absence a compound
102
Mother and Offspring
107
The Lower Animals fit subjects of benevolent sentiment
114
Elements of the Religious Sentiment
121
56
125
SELFGRATULATION AND SELFESTEEM
128
Selfesteem Selfconceit Selfconfidence
134
Arts of Politesse
140
The most disinterested actions still a part of Self
144
1
145
Illustrations from labour
150
Control of other mens wills
156
THE IRASCIBLE EMOTION
163
Antipathy
174
Noble Rage
180
Expression of the attitude of pursuit
186
Operations of industry as involving the emotion of pur
191
Pains connected with pursuit
198
Comparisons in Poetry Harmony in the Fine Arts
204
CHAPTER XII
210
Character for infectiousness proper to the various simple
216
temperaments
223
Mimicry
225
Interest arising out of faithful imitation by an Artist
226
OF IDEAL EMOTION
228
Purely ideal subsistence of states of feeling
229
Specific tendency of the brain towards emotion 5 Individuals are constituted so as to entertain some emo tions in preference to others
232
Repetition and habit may give an emotional bent 7 Influence of physical stimulants narcotics
236
Similarity
239
Pleasures of the Imagination
243
The muscular and sensual feelings may be brought
249
Cooperation of the Intellect
255
Accent
261
Melody of Speech
262
Light and Shade
263
Straight Outlines
264
Curved Outlines
266
Pressure and Support
267
port
268
Appearance of Ease in objects employed in giving sup 23 Symmetry
269
Note on Complex Harmonies Unity Variety
270
Fitness the Ęsthetic of Utility
271
Order Cleanliness Polish 27 The Sublime Objects and emotion
273
Sublime of Support The mountain precipice and abyss ib 29 Sublimity of Space Commanding prospects in scenery
274
Greatness of Time
275
Sublime of the Human Character
276
Natural Objects in general Mineral and Vegetable Kingdoms Surface of the globe
277
The Animal Kingdom its beauties and deformities 34 The Human form
279
Beauties of Movement and Expression
280
Beauty and grace in Human Character
281
The Ludicrous Causes of Laughter 38 All incongruity is not ludicrous 39 The Comic is the rebound from the Serious
283
CHAPTER XV
286
Variety of Moral Theories
287
Organic Sensations Appeasing of Thirst
355
Feelings of Respiration Warmth and Chillness
357
Sucking
358
Mastication
360
Snuffing sweet Odours and recoiling from the opposite
363
Cherishing agreeable sensations of Touch
365
Avoiding painful Touches
366
Training of the whip
367
Movements to attain the pleasures or avoid the pains of Sight Beginnings of Attention
369
Appetites and their gratification Sex
371
Movements to the lead of the special emotions
372
Associates
373
of warmth food c
374
Chase for food by the lower animals
375
CHAPTER III
377
Acquirement of a more general control of the voluntary organs The Word of Command
378
Faculty of Imitation
381
Imitation of movements at sight
385
Graduated command of the muscles for the execution of nice operations
386
Imitation of movements of the features Teaching the deaf to speak
388
Power of acting to a wish to move a member
389
Working to pleasure or from pain in idea
393
course of the will 482
394
The direct power of the will confined to the muscular
400
Control of the feelings a good test of the volitional energy
407
Constructive association a voluntary process
414
CHAPTER V
420
Of aggregated derivative and intermediate ends
428
State of antipathy or disgust
435
CHAPTER VI
441
The same pleasure or pain acting on different occasions
447
The link between present action and present feeling
451
Conflict of the actual with the ideal
453
Deliberation a voluntary act prompted by the known
457
Ungratified desire has to be met in other ways Simple endurance
483
Endurance prompted by the pain of conflict
485
Ideal or imaginary action
487
Persistence of a feeling in absence a condition of imagi nary gratification
488
Examples of ideal activity
489
Emotions suited to imaginary gratification
491
The memory of pleasure has a sting of pain from the sense of its being below the reality
492
Sense of Difference
493
Provocatives of desire
494
Susceptibility to ideal inflammation
496
Desire most effectually stimulated by growing pleasure
498
CHAPTER IX
500
Control of Sense and Appetite
501
Examples The habit of early rising 4 The proper initiatives of habits 5 Habits of Temperance
505
Habit of Courage 11 Tender Emotion
510
Sentiment of Power Command of the Temper
512
Pleasures of Sport and Plotinterest Emotions of Intellect
513
Taste and Ęsthetic culture ib 15 Sudden conversions as opposed to the slow course of habit
514
Habits modifying the original spontaneity
515
Promptings supplied from without
521
Duty Selfpromptings
527
The Independent Conscience
532
CHAPTER VIII
539
Necessity
548
Consciousness of Freewill Is consciousness an infallible
555
Assertions that have been put forward under the infal
561
DESIRE
568
Belief in coming evil
577
Belief accompanies action and precedes experience
583
Opposition of confidence and fear
590
How can we be said to believe in things beyond
596
Prevalent meanings of the term consciousness
605
Neutral excitement has a positive efficacy as regards
612
Discrimination the fundamental fact of Intelligence
614
Neutral excitement may not always be intellectual
622
Sensation and Perception
629
When action follows at once there is no place for Desire
647
235
648
510
649

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Page 87 - ... where ; To lie in cold obstruction, and to rot ; This sensible warm motion to become A kneaded clod ; and the delighted spirit To bathe in fiery floods, or to reside In thrilling...
Page 206 - Tis now the very witching time of night, When churchyards yawn, and hell itself breathes out Contagion to this world : now could I drink hot blood, And do such bitter business as the day Would quake to look on.
Page 87 - Ay, but to die, and go we know not where ; To lie in cold obstruction, and to rot ; This sensible warm motion to become A kneaded clod...
Page 27 - I will omit much usual declamation on the dignity and capacity of our nature; the superiority of the soul to the body, of the rational to the animal part of our constitution ; upon the worthiness, refinement, and delicacy, of some satisfactions, or the meanness, grossness, and sensuality, of others ; because 1 hold that pleasures differ in nothing, but in continuance and intensity...
Page 286 - Perhaps it was right to dissemble your love, But why did you kick me down stairs...
Page 92 - I could a tale unfold whose lightest word Would harrow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood, Make thy two eyes, like stars, start from their spheres, Thy knotted and combined locks to part And each particular hair to stand on end, Like quills upon the fretful porcupine : But this eternal blazon must not be To ears of flesh and blood.
Page 255 - Among these several kinds of beauty the eye takes most delight in colours. We no where meet with a more glorious or pleasing show in nature than what appears in the heavens at the rising and setting of the sun, which is wholly made up of those different stains of light that show themselves in clouds of a different situation.
Page 147 - As we advance in years, and as our animal powers lose their activity and vigour, we gradually aim at extending our influence over others, by the superiority of fortune and of situation, or by the still more flattering superiority of intellectual endowments ; by the force of our understanding ; by the extent of our information ; by the arts of persuasion, or the accomplishments of address. What but the idea of power pleases the orator, in...
Page 286 - Here thou, great ANNA ! whom three realms obey, Dost sometimes counsel take — and sometimes tea.
Page 146 - Whenever we are led to consider ourselves as the authors of any effect, we feel a sensible pride or exultation in the consciousness of Power ; and the pleasure is, in general, proportioned to the greatness of the effect, compared to the smallness of our exertion.

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