Sappho in Early Modern England: Female Same-Sex Literary Erotics, 1550-1714

Front Cover
University of Chicago Press, Jul 15, 2001 - Literary Criticism - 254 pages
In Sappho in Early Modern England, Harriette Andreadis examines public and private expressions of female same-sex sexuality in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England. Before the language of modern sexual identities developed, a variety of discourses in both literary and extraliterary texts began to form a lexicon of female intimacy. Looking at accounts of non-normative female sexualities in travel narratives, anatomies, and even marital advice books, Andreadis outlines the vernacular through which a female same-sex erotics first entered verbal consciousness. She finds that "respectable" women of the middle classes and aristocracy who did not wish to identify themselves as sexually transgressive developed new vocabularies to describe their desires; women that we might call bisexual or lesbian, referred to in their day as tribades, fricatrices, or "rubsters," emerged in erotic discourses that allowed them to acknowledge their sexuality and still evade disapproval.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Chapter I an erotics of unnaming
1
early modern public discourse
27
the legacy of katherine philips
55
Chapter IV doubling discourses in an erotics of female friendship
101
the turn of the century at court
151
Notes
177
Bibliography
217
Acknowledgments
239
Index
241
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2001)

Harriette Andreadis is an associate professor of English at Texas A&M University.

Bibliographic information