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with a proper gate into the Quire," a deliverance which can only mean that the building was originally covered by an inner and an outer vaulting, the latter roofed with slabs, as at Corstorphine. Presumably the inner arch proved unfit to carry the burden thus imposed upon it, and soon the structure became the roofless ruin which now we see.

From instructions given in 1784 to the builders of the present parish

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church, we gather that the ancient sanctuary was an exceptionally long and narrow structure. The ruined choir measures 31 feet in length, 23 feet in breadth, the ivy-clad walls being 9 feet in height and 33 inches in thickness. Repairs have obliterated nearly every detail of ancient work, but the exterior of the south wall shows two remarkable features, a door and a window, built up, but clearly traceable. These have arched lintels hewn from single stones, as shown in the measured

drawing (fig. 1) prepared by Mr John Watson, F.S.A. Scot., who assigns the work to a period not later than the fifteenth century. The sill of the window is now level with the ground outside, and only 3 feet 6 inches of the doorway is there visible. Investigation is difficult through elaborate pointing and the growth of ivy, but it is fairly obvious that the window was splayed towards the interior, and quite clear that both openings are chamfered round ther exterior angles.

Mr R. B. Langwill, who contributed interesting annals of his father's parish to the local supplement of Life and Work, observes: "Underneath the pathway to the west of the 'quire,' are traces of masonry showing that the north and south walls are continued in that direction." These foundations point to transeptal buildings, and regarding the builtup door and window Mr Langwill speculates: "Adjoining the 'quire' on the south side, and communicating with it by means of the little doorway already mentioned, there may have been a small chapel or confessional." The idea is attractive, but it is not supported by constructive evidences. The chamfering of the angles points not to interior but to exterior conditions, and the splaying of the window further supports that view. Thus the window was simply one of the choir 'lights, and the door a means of entrance and exit for those in official positions. In any case, this remnant is of remarkable interest, and worthy of attention, study, and preservation.

Within this enclosure are a number of mural tombstones, the most important of which dates from 1670, and bears the following inscription. in Latin:

HIC SEPVLTVS EST GE
NEROSVS IUVENIS ROBE
RTVS CLYHILLEVS FILIV
S PRIMOGENITVS DOMI
NI DE INNERGOWRIE QVI
H&C ACCEDENS VT AVU
NCVLVM INVISERET HV
JVS LOCI PASTOREM FATALV
FEBRE CORREPTVS 13 AGUSTI
ANNO SALVTIS 1670 AC
ETATIS SVE 21 OCCVBUIT

Robert Clayhills, eldest son of the Laird of Invergowrie, near Dundee, is commemorated here. He died of fever in his 21st year, while on a visit to his uncle, the minister of Currie. Some of the details of this mural monument (fig. 2) have suffered, but in the main it is in good

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Fig. 2. The Invergowrie Tombstone.

preservation, and of pleasing character. The winged cherub head is particularly good, and the mouldings are excellently wrought. This tablet shows the only armorial bearings to be seen at Currie, most of the neighbouring estates having places of family burial.

The most imposing monument in this churchyard is that of the Rev. Matthew Leighton, an old minister of the parish, and the son of its first

post-Reformation cleric. It is a lofty structure of classic style, and also bears a Latin inscription well worthy of record :

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MATTHEUS LIGHTONIUS
SEPULTVS EST EVANGELI
QUI PRÆDICANDI MUNERE
ESTATIBUS QUAMPLURAMIS
PERFUNCTUS EST FIDELITER
NUNC VITA QUOD PRECONIO
RESPONDERIT FRUISCITUR

QUAM PRÆDICABAT GLORIAM

Freely translated, this epitaph records that Matthew Leighton is buried here, who performed faithfully the duty of preaching the Gospel, for as many summers as possible, and that now he enjoys the life which in his preaching he promised, and the glory which he proclaimed. Very evidently this tomb was originally more elegant than now appears, for it collapsed during repairs, consequent on the removal of the old southern wall to which it was attached, and was rebuilt from memory by a local

mason.

Nearly in the centre of the ground, and in line with the east gable of the church and the Leighton monument, stands a memorial of 1700 (fig. 3), which shows several quaint and unusual features. Whimsical, if not humorous in feeling, are the lines disposed round an initialled oval panel, for they serve admirably as legs and arms to a device whose effect is crowned by the whiskered face, presumably, of the tenant of the tomb.

Under this shield, which is on the west face of the stone, is the inscription" Heir Lyes John Ingles Husband to Jean Moubray Who Dyed the 10 of November 1700 his age 69 years." The east face shows the cherub-head winged and crowned, a scroll with inscription in Latin, an hour-glass, skull, and cross-bones of the usual type.

Seven paces eastwards is the memorial of George Ferrier, who died in 1721. It shows a winged cherub-head on a moulded pediment, single and crossed spades in the four panels of both flat pilasters, an hour

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