Bergman's Muses: Ćsthetic Versatility in Film, Theatre, Television and Radio

Front Cover
McFarland, Jun 28, 2010 - Performing Arts - 271 pages
Bergman is a most versatile director who has devoted himself to several muses in a variety of media. Apart from being a writer of plays and screenplays, he has over the past fifty years directed about a hundred stage performances, fifty films, and many works for radio and television. During this time, all the production equipment used have undergone significant changes (allowing, just for instance, a more varied and subtle use of light and sound). But by his own admission, Bergman’s texts have often lacked a clear orientation toward a specific medium. This book focuses on Bergman’s way of tackling the problems inherent in each art form he has dealt with, giving a penetrating picture of his craftsmanship and the intimate relationship between his work on stage and in film, as well as the possibilities and limitations of the various forms. With the varied media at his disposal, Bergman is internationally the most versatile author-cum-director presently at work, well aware of what each medium can and cannot do and, most importantly, eager to test its borders. The book addresses itself not only to Bergman fans but also to all those interested in the aesthetic problems related to different presentational forms.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
1
II
5
III
21
IV
36
V
46
VI
65
VII
80
VIII
91
XIII
161
XIV
172
XV
181
XVI
197
XVII
204
XVIII
215
XIX
221
XX
235

IX
101
X
117
XI
129
XII
146
XXI
251
XXII
261
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 5 - A hot medium is one that extends one single sense in "high definition." High definition is the state of being well filled with data. A photograph is, visually, "high definition.
Page 200 - Jesus answered and said unto her, If thou knewest the gift of God, and Who it is that saith to thee, Give me to drink ; thou wouldest have asked of him, and he would have given thee living water.
Page 46 - The playwright of today must dig at the roots of the sickness of today as he feels it — the death of the old God and the failure of science and materialism to give any satisfactory new one for the surviving primitive religious instinct to find a meaning for life in, and to comfort its fears of death with.
Page 100 - Modern psychological drama using one of the old legend plots of Greek tragedy for its basic theme — the Electra story — the Medea? Is it possible to get modern psychological approximation of Greek sense of fate into such a play, which an intelligent audience of to-day, possessed of no belief in gods or supernatural retribution, could accept and be moved by?
Page 46 - It is really the first play of a trilogy that will dig at the roots of the sickness of today as I feel it— the death of the old God and the failure of science and materialism to give any satisfying new one for the surviving primitive religious instinct to find a meaning for life in, and to comfort its fears of death with.
Page 73 - O ew'ge Nacht! Wann wirst du Schwinden? Wann wird das Licht mein Auge finden?
Page 46 - O'Neill] must dig at the roots of the sickness of today as he feels it — the death of the old God and the failure of science and materialism to give any satisfying new one for the surviving primitive religious instinct to find a meaning for life in, and to comfort its fears of death with. It seems to me...
Page 5 - And speech is a cool medium of low definition, because so little is given and so much has to be filled in by the listener.
Page 97 - As flies to wanton boys are we to th' gods. They kill us for their sport.
Page 23 - ALVING across to him. Osvald, what's the matter with you? OSVALD seems to shrink in his chair; all his muscles go slack; his face is expressionless; his eyes stare vacantly.

About the author (2010)

Egil Törnqvist, professor emeritus at the University of Amsterdam, is a leading Bergman scholar. He has also published books on Ibsen, Strindberg, and O’Neill and has lectured widely in Europe, the United States and China. He lives in Amsterdam, Holland.

Bibliographic information