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" The mind is a kind of theatre, where several perceptions successively make their appearance ; pass, repass, glide away, and mingle in an infinite variety of postures and situations. "
A Treatise of Human Nature - Page 251
by David Hume - 1888 - 709 pages
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Philosophical Works, Volume 1

David Hume - Philosophy - 1854
...contribute to this change ; nor is there any single power of the soul, which remains unalterably the same, perhaps for one moment. The mind is a kind of theatre,...pass, repass, glide away, and mingle in an infinite varicty of postures and situations. There is properly no simplicity in it at one time, nor identity...
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The collected works of Dugald Stewart, Volume 10

Dugald Stewart, John Veitch - 1858
...succeed each other with an inconceivable rapidity, and are in a perpetual flux and movement. . . . The mind is a kind of theatre, where several perceptions...appearance ; pass, repass, glide away, and mingle iu an infinite variety of postures and situations. There is properly no simplicity in it at one time,...
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Elements of Psychology: Included in a Critical Examination of Locke's Essay ...

Victor Cousin - Psychology - 1855 - 568 pages
...The mind is a kind of theater, where several perceptions successively make their appearance, pass and repass, glide away and mingle in an infinite variety of postures and situations The comparison of the theater must not mislead us. They are the successive perceptions only that constitute...
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A Treatise on Human Nature: Being an Attempt to Introduce the ..., Volume 1

David Hume - Knowledge, Theory of - 1874
...contradiction in terms. There can be ' properly no simplicity in it at one time, nor identity at different ; it is a kind of theatre where • several perceptions successively make their appearance.' But this comparison must not mislead us. ' They are the successive perceptions only, that constitute...
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A Treatise on Human Nature: Being an Attempt to Introduce the ..., Volume 1

David Hume - Knowledge, Theory of - 1874
...contradiction in terms. There can be ' properly no simplicity in it at one time, nor identity at different ; it is a kind of theatre where several perceptions successively make their appearance.' But this comparison must not mislead us. ' They are the successive perceptions only, that constitute...
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Mind, Volume 2

Philosophy - 1893
...Nature in which he affects to prove that of self we have no " real idea ". " The mind," he says, " is a kind of theatre, where several perceptions successively...simplicity in it at one time, nor identity in different." And lest his readers should reply : But players at least imply a stage, as impressions — to use Locke's...
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Papers of the Manchester Literary Club, Volumes 6-7

Manchester Literary Club - Literature - 1880
...contribute to this change. Nor is there any single power of the soul which remains unalterably the same, perhaps, for one moment. The mind is a kind of theatre,...make their appearance ; pass, repass, glide away, mingle in an infinite variety of postures and situations. There is properly no simplicity in it at...
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Reasonable apprehensions and reassuring hints

Henry Footman - Apologetics - 1883 - 151 pages
...inconceivable rapidity, and are in perpetual flux and movement. The mind, continues the great sceptic, is a kind of theatre where several perceptions successively...infinite variety of postures and situations. There is no simplicity in it at one time, nor identity in different times, whatever natural propension we may...
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In Aid of Faith

Lyman Abbott - Faith - 1886 - 174 pages
...as independent of the brain as a telegraph operator is of his instrument." "The mind," says Hume, " is a kind of theatre, where several perceptions successively...There is properly no simplicity in it at one time, no identity in different times, whatever natural propensity we may have to imagine that simplicity...
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In Aid of Faith

Lyman Abbott - Faith - 1886 - 188 pages
...as independent of the brain as a telegraph operator is of his instrument." "The mind," says Hume, " is a kind of theatre, where several perceptions successively make their appearance, pass, rcpass, glide away, and mingle in an infinite variety of postures and situations. There is properly...
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