International Law Situations, with Solutions and Notes. 1901

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1901 - International law - 180 pages
 

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Page 143 - That the United States hereby disclaims any disposition or intention to exercise sovereignty, jurisdiction, or control over said island, except for the pacification thereof, and asserts its determination when that is accomplished, to leave the government and control of the island to its people.
Page 144 - Third, that the President of the United States be, and he hereby is, directed and empowered to use the entire land and naval forces of the United States, and to call into the actual service of the United States the militia of the several States to such extent as may be necessary to carry these resolutions into effect.
Page 153 - Privateering is and remains abolished; 2. The neutral flag covers enemy's goods, with the exception of contraband of war; 3. Neutral goods, with the exception of contraband of war, are not liable to capture under enemy's flag; 4.
Page 140 - Neutral goods, with the exception of contraband of war, are not liable to capture under enemy's flag ; 4. Blockades, in order to be binding, must be effective, that is to say, maintained by a force sufficient really to prevent access to the coast of the enemy.
Page 89 - Parties, although the whole lading, or any part thereof, should appertain to the Enemies of either, Contraband Goods being always excepted. It is also agreed, in like manner, that the same liberty be extended to Persons who are on board a Free Ship, with this effect, that although they be Enemies to both or either Party, they are not to be taken out of that Free Ship, unless they are Officers or Soldiers, and in the actual service of the Enemies...
Page 135 - And I do hereby also make known that whosoever of the citizens of the United States shall render himself liable to punishment or forfeiture under the law of nations by committing, aiding, or abetting hostilities against any of the said powers, or by carrying to any of them those articles which are deemed contraband by the modern nsage of nations, will not receive the protection of the United States against such punishment or forfeiture...
Page 153 - Spanish vessels having on board any officer in the military or naval service of the enemy, or any coal (except such as may be necessary for their voyage), or any other article prohibited or contraband of war, or any despatch of or to the Spanish Government.
Page 155 - Blockades in order to be binding must be effective. 4. Spanish merchant vessels in any ports or places within the United States shall be allowed till May 21, 1898, inclusive, for loading their cargoes and departing from such ports or places; and such Spanish merchant vessels, if met at sea by any United States ship, shall be permitted to continue their voyage if on examination of their papers it shall appear that their cargoes were taken on...
Page 136 - ... without incurring the risk of hostile capture and the penalties denounced by the law of nations in that behalf.
Page 92 - Nor let it be supposed, that it is an act of light and casual importance. The consequence of such a service is indefinite, infinitely beyond the effect of any contraband that can be conveyed. The carrying of two or three cargoes of stores is necessarily an assistance of a limited nature ; but in the transmission of dispatches may be conveyed the entire plan of a campaign, that may defeat all the projects of the other Belligerent in that quarter of the world.

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