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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR-BUREAU OF EDUCATION.

U.S. - Bureau of education.

BULLETIN.
NO. 1, 1906.

THE EDUCATION BILL OF 1906 FOR

ENGLAND AND WALES AS IT PAST THE HOUSE OF COMMONS.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS.

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LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

BUREAU OF EDUCATION,

Washington, D. C., August 30, 1906. Sir: In accordance with the provisions of the act approved May 28, 1896 (29 Stat. L., 171), authorizing the publication by the Bureau of Education of a bulletin “as to the condition of higher education, technical and industrial education, facts as to compulsory attendance in the schools, and such other educational topics in the several States of the Union and in foreign countries as may be deemed of value to the educational interests of the States,” I have the honor to present herewith the first number of such bulletin for the year 1906, and to recommend its publication. This paper, prepared under my direction by Miss Anna Tolman Smith, of the staff of this Office, relates to the new English education bill, which had past the House of Commons and had gone to second reading in the House of Lords before the beginning of the present recess of Parliament. The introductory portion shows the relation of this bill to the historical development of public education in England and Wales. The passages carefully selected from the debate in Parliament and from other public utterances, show the nature of the changes which the bill would introduce by showing the attitude of the different parties and of well-known leaders toward those changes. Finally, the full text of the bill is given as it left the Commons, together with the text of the more important provisions of the act of 1902, now in force, which are necessary to a full understanding of the new measure.

The great interest in this bill which has been manifested in our country, the fact that for several months it has been and for months to come it is likely to be the pivot of English politics and of English education, and the further fact that it presents, in their English form, questions with which, in underlying principle, American education is concernedthese considerations give warrant to the hope that such a publication will be found timely and useful.

The following additional numbers of this bulletin are in course of preparation, and will, in all likelihood, be ready for publication during the coming fall and winter:

One relating to the report on American education recently made by the commission appointed by the Prussian ministry of commerce and industry, who visited this country in 1904;

One relating to the changes which have been made in our State school systems since 1904; One relating to changes in city school systems within the same period;

One relating to the German Hilfsschulen, or schools for backward and exceptional children. Very respectfully,

ELMER ELLSWORTH BROWN,

Commissioner. The SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR.

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