Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything

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HarperCollins, Aug 25, 2009 - Business & Economics - 352 pages

Which is more dangerous, a gun or a swimming pool?

What do schoolteachers and sumo wrestlers have in common?

How much do parents really matter?

These may not sound like typical questions for an economist to ask. But Steven D. Levitt is not a typical economist. He studies the riddles of everyday life—from cheating and crime to parenting and sports—and reaches conclusions that turn conventional wisdom on its head. Freakonomics is a groundbreaking collaboration between Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner, an award-winning author and journalist. They set out to explore the inner workings of a crack gang, the truth about real estate agents, the secrets of the Ku Klux Klan, and much more. Through forceful storytelling and wry insight, they show that economics is, at root, the study of incentives—how people get what they want or need, especially when other people want or need the same thing.

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User Review  - xiaomarlo - www.librarything.com

It's like a Malcolm Gladwell book, but written by economists -- it's definitely got that asshole quality about it where they're like "we're just looking at the numbers! we're the only ones being ... Read full review

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User Review  - cavernism - www.librarything.com

Interesting enough that I got through it pretty quickly, but each chapter was kind of ..unsatisfying. I wasn't shocked or awed by many hypotheses or "revelations" put forth, and I don't know if I came ... Read full review

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About the author (2009)

Steven D. Levitt is a professor of economics at the University of Chicago and a recipient of the John Bates Clark Medal, awarded to the most influential economist under the age of forty.

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