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Gifford (ubi supra) observes that the verb twire “is frequent in our early writers.” He might have added that it occurs in the works of comparatively recent authors, — for instance, in Sir R. Steele's Conscious Lovers.

Mrs. Behn uses twire as a substantive;

Ah, such an eye, so sparkling, with an amorous twire !" Feign'd Courtizans, act i. sc. 2,—Works, ii. 408, ed. 1702.

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“ A thousand favours from a maund she drew

Of amber, crystal, and of bedded jet." “ Possibly a misprint for · beaded jet,' and so, Malone remarks, it was formerly printed; but as the original may mean jet set in metal, we do not alter it.” COLLIER.

“So the original, the word probably meaning jet imbedded, or set, in some other substance. Steevens has beaded jet,-jet formed into beads; which Mr. Dyce adopts." Knight.

Read, by all means, “beaded :" "bedded jet” could not signify ‘jet artificially set in metal or any other substance ;' it could mean nothing but'jet embedded in its native soil.'

A FEW REMARKS

ON

GIFFORD'S EDITION OF B. JONSON'S WORKS.

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