New York as an Eighteenth Century Municipality, Part 1

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Page 228 - Be it Ordained by the Mayor Recorder Aldermen and assistants of the City of New York convened in Common Council...
Page 230 - Council convened and it is hereby ordained by the Authority of the same That from...
Page 243 - A Copy of the Poll List of the Election for Representatives for the City and County of New York...
Page 196 - On the top of which cage was placed a pillory, for the punishment of bakers offending in the assize of bread, for millers stealing of corn at the mill, for bawds, scolds, and other offenders.
Page 15 - Philadelphia, be, and shall be, for ever hereafter, persons able and capable in law, to sue and be sued, plead and be impleaded, answer and be answered unto, defend and be defended...
Page 104 - York the magistrates occasionally ordered lights "hung out on a Pole" from the upper windows of houses "in the Darke time of the Moon." This was done by private persons, "without expense to the Corporation." In 1697, "the great Inconveniency that Attends this Citty, being A trading place for want of Lights" led the authorities to order lanterns or lights put in the windows nightly, under penalty of a fine for neglect. Within a month, however, they changed this rule, and ordered "A Lanthorn & Candle...
Page 72 - ... to teach the said apprentice, the business or occupation which he pursues for a livelihood; and also, to read, write, and cipher, as far as the rule of three ; and at the expiration of said apprenticeship, to furnish the said apprentice with two complete new suits of clothing.
Page 118 - That the supreme legislature did intend a transportation to America, for a punishment of these villains, I verily believe: but so great is the mistake, that confident I am, they are thereby, on the contrary, highly rewarded. For what, in God's name, can be more agreeable to a penurious wretch...
Page 124 - The Citizens are summoned, at least four Times a Year to watch, or pay their Two and Six-Pence to a Parcel of idle, drunken, vigilant Snorers, who never quelled any nocturnal Tumult in their Lives; but would, perhaps, be as ready to join in a Burglary, as any Thief in Christendom.
Page 171 - Broadway fronting to the Fort to some of the Inhabitants of the Said Broadway in Order to be Inclosed to make A Bowling Green thereof with walks therein, for the Beauty & Ornament of the Said Street as well as for the Recreation & Delight of the Inhabitants...

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