Under Siege: Racism and Violence in Britain Today

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Keith Teare, 1988 - Political Science - 204 pages

 Under Siege charts the period between 1945 and 1988 when British immigration policy shifted from an open-door policy, welcoming immigrants, to the 1981 Nationality Act when over 200 million former citizens were deemed to be non-citizens, It examines the street level consequences of policy debate in which all parties represented anti-immigrant points of view.

 

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Page 67 - Smethwick election it has been quite clear that immigration can be the greatest potential vote loser for the Labour party if we are seen to be permitting a flood of immigrants to come in and blight the central areas of our cities
Page 71 - I think it means that people are really rather afraid that this country might be rather swamped by people with a different culture. And, you know, the British character has done so much for democracy, for law, and done so much throughout the world, that if there is any fear that it might be swamped, people are going to react and be rather hostile to those coming in.
Page 95 - State may pay to local authorities who in his opinion are required to make special provision in the exercise of any of their functions, in consequence of the presence within their areas of substantial numbers of immigrants from the Commonwealth whose language and customs differ from those of the community...
Page 17 - Any incident in which it appears to the reporting or investigating officer that the complaint involves an element of racial motivation; or any incident which includes an allegation of racial motivation made by any person.
Page 186 - Therefore, racism may be viewed as any attitude, action, or institutional structure which subordinates a person or group because of his or their color. Even though "race
Page 71 - If we went on as we are, then by the end of the century there would be 4 million people of the New Commonwealth or Pakistan here. Now that is an awful lot and I think it means that people are really rather afraid that this country might be swamped by people with a different culture. And you know, the British character has done so much for democracy, for law, and done so much throughout...
Page 68 - This has been one of the most difficult and unpleasant jobs the Government has had to do. We have become illiberal and lowered the quotas at a time when we have an acute shortage of labour.
Page 177 - Labour party proclaimed as late as 1933, "are in a condition which could make it impossible for them to take over the government of their country on modern lines. In such cases, what is required is education and preparation with the definite object of training the population in self-government."45 Nobody was listening.
Page 177 - In the second place, the English bourgeoisie has not only exploited the Irish poverty to keep down the working class in England by forced immigration of poor Irishmen, but it has also divided the proletariat into two hostile camps.
Page 68 - ... the most difficult and unpleasant jobs the Government has had to do. We have become illiberal and lowered the quotas at a time when we have an acute shortage of labour. No wonder all the weekend liberal papers have been bitterly attacking us. Nevertheless, I am convinced that if we hadn't done all this we would have been faced with certain electoral defeat in the West Midlands and the South-East.

About the author (1988)

 Keith Tompson is a pen name for Silicon Valley entrepreneur Keith Teare. He was active in anti-racist campaigns in the UK between 1979 and 1996. This book was written at a time when extreme right wing groups were targeting activists, hence the use of a pen name to protect his identity.