Page images
PDF
EPUB
[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

Susquehanna river section.

Eastern Division. Item 1. From Strickler's through Columbia

Item 1. From Mine ridge to Moore's mill to Chickes's rock, common, forming 160

pond. chains

1,000 00 Excavation on 179 ch, 3,329 cub yds at 6 cts 199 74 Walling in river 1 mile 4225 perches at 75 cts. 3,168 75 Double drain on 57 ch, single on 179 ch, Filling in do. 37546 cubic yds. at 10 cts. 3,754 60 7,876 cub yds at 6 cts

472 86 Chickesalunga creek bridge, covered 1,250 00 Four bridges of 10 feet

320 00 Bridge a Moore's, stone piers and covered 6,375 00

9,173 35 Item 2. From Chickesalunga to Marietta.

7,367 60 Double drain on 85.49 ch. 7523 cubic yds,

Item 2. From Moore's to Cloud's. at 6 cts.

Excavation on 128.26 ch mean y section 1

451 38 Small bridge

120 00
9-10 sq yds, 5,362 cub yds at 6 cts

321 72 Single drain along do,5,644 cub yds at 6 cts 338 64

Embankment on 3 ch, 330 cub yds at 10 cts 33 00

571 38 Item 3. From Marietta to Vinegar's ferry road.

Slope wall on 54.68 ch, 927 perches at 75 cts 695 00 Double drain on 283 ch. 23144 cubic yards

Four bridges of 10 feet

320 00 at 8 cts.

Bridge at Cloud's, wooden frame upon stone 1,851 52

foundation, wooden superstructure and Bridge at Longenecker's and embankment 1,000,00

covered,

4,375 00 2,851 52 Item 4. From Vinegar's ferry road to Conoy

6,083 36 creek.

Item 3. From Cloud's to Octoraro summit. Excavation on 94.39 ch * section 9-10 sq

Excavation on 223 ch - section 1 1-3 sq yds yds 1,863 cubic yards at 8 cts

149 04
6541 cub yds at 6 cts

392 40 Double drain on 59 ch and single on 35 ch

Single drain along do, 9.820 cub yds at 6 cts 588 72 6,732 cubic yards at 8cts

538 56

Embankment on 7 ch; 1,560 cub ys at 10 cts 156 00 179.44 ch double drain, 15,791 cub yards at

Cut summit 10.23 feet base 20 ch, 9,566 cub 8 cts

yds at 10 cts

955 90 1,263 28 4 bridges 2 of 20 and 2 of 10 feet 400 00

2,093 02 Item 4 From Octoraro summit to Buck

2,350 88 Item 5, Susquehanna river section, from Co

run summit. noy creek to Bainbridge.

Excavation on 226.76 ch * section 1 sq yd, Rock excavation 1.88 ch 390 cub yards at 62

4,988 cub yds at 6 cts

299 28 1-2 cts

243 75

Embankment on 5.70 ch, 1,791 cub yds at Cutting on 56 80 ch x section 44 sq yards,

10 cts.

179 10 5,623 cub ys at 20 cts

1,124 60

Single drain on 227.76 ch, 9,079 cub yds at Filling in and embanking 13.98, 1,770 cubic

61 cents

598 56 yards at 10 cts

177 00

Cut summit base 23 ch 30 feet, 48,913 cub Dry wall on 13.21 ch, 347 perches at 75 cts 260 22

yds at 20 cts

9,782 60 Paving on 8.45 ch, 471 sq yds at 46 cts

216 66

Bridge over branch of Buck run at Park's 300 00 Back drain on 41 ch, 1,304 cub yds at 15 cts 270 60 Bridge over Buck run, covered

8000 00 Bridge across Conoy creek, covered, 720 00

19,159 54 Item 5. From Buck run summit to West

3,012 83 Item 6, From Bainbridge to a point oppo

Brandywine. site Wood Island.

Excavating 243.41 ch, 20,365 yds at 8 cts 1,629 20 Excavating 48-09 ch, section 31 sq yards,

Embankment on 11 ch, 2,837 cub yds at

10 cts 3,438 cub yds at 18 cts 618 84

283 70 Single drain on 35.87 ch, 1,578 cub yards at

Single drain on 243.41 ch, 10,710 cub yds at

8 cts 12 cts 189 36

856 80 Dry wall on 48.09 ch, 809 perches at 75 cts 608 75

Slope wall on 22.75 ch, 978 perches at 75 cts 733 50 Paving 1 ch, 51 sq yds at 46 cts

23 46
5 bridges, 66, 33, 33, 20 and 10 feet

1,650 00 2 bridges, 1 of 20 and 1 of 10 feet

200 00

Bridge over West Brandywine, stone piers,

wooden superstructure and covered

1,640 41 Item 7. From Wood island to York Haven

22.943 20 Item 6. From West Brandywine to Gardroad.

ner's ridge. Excavation on 15.12 ch " section 24 sq feet,

Excavation on 146.38 ch 14 sq feet, 5,008 887 cub yds at 8 cts

70 96
cub yds at 6 cts

300 48 Double drain on 146 56 ch 12,897 cub yds at

Cut at Gardner's ridge 3.55 feet 4 chains base, 8 cts

1031 76

547 cub yds at 8 cts Embankment on 1 ch, 88 cub yds at 10 cts 8 80 single drain on 46.33 ch. double do. on 4 ch, 2 bridges, 1 of 185 feet and 1 of 24 feet 1,750 00

6,790 cub yds at 6 cts

407 40 2,861 52 Item 8. Susquehanna river section, from

Item. 7. From Gardner's to East BrandyYork Haven road to Hopkin's dam.

wine. Excavation on 85.38 ch section 1 2-10 sq

Excavation on 450.10 chains section 2} sq yds, 2,254 cub yds at 18 cts

405 72 yds, 24,755 cub yds at 6 cts Single drain along same, 3,755 cub yds at

Single drain on do. 19,804 cub yds at 6 cts 18 cts 675 97 Embankment on 2 ch, 660 cub yds at 10 cts

66 00 3 bridges, 2 of 10 and 1 of 20 feet

320 00 Bridge over Beaver creek, covered

Bridge over Brandywine, stone piers, cor'd 13,405 00 1,401 69

17,790 00

43 62

751 50

1,485 30 1,188 24

5,724 00

21,868 54

1828.]

RAIL ROAD.

105

15

14

Item 8. From East Brandywine to Trimble's

2 bridges of 10 feet with 6,020 cub yds em-
Saw mili.
bankment

1,000 00 Excavation on 355.34 ch is section 14 sq ft. 12,160 cub yds at 6 cts 729 60

5.643 46 Single drain along do. 15,634 cub yds at 6c 938 04 Embankment on 5.50 ch, 2,645 cub yds at

Summary of the estimate for common road forming on 10 cts

264 50

the Susquehanna river section, including bridges and Small bridge over Robert's run

embankment.

200 00
Do. over Valley creek at Trimble's 300 00 Item 1. From Strickler's to Chickesalunga

creek

9,173 35 2,432 14

2

Chickesalunga to Marietta 571 28 Item 9. From Trimble's mill to summit near

3

Marietta to Vinegar ferry rd. 2,851 52 White Horse.

Vinegar ferry rd. to Conoy cr. 2,350 88 Excavation on 226.50 ch x section 2.8 sq ys,

Conoy cr. to Bainbridge 3,012 83 13,953 cub yds at 6 cts

837 18

Bainbridge to a point oppoSingle drain on do. 9,966 cub yds at 8 cts 597 96

site Wood Island

1,640 41 7

Wood Isl. to York Haven rd. 2,861 52 1,435 14

York Haven rd. to Hopkin's Item 10. From White Horse to Academy

dam

1,401 69 summit. Excavation on 92} ch section 6 sq ft. 1,356

23,863 48 cub yds at 6 cts

81 36 Average cost per mile, the distance being Single drain on do. 4,070 cub yds at 6 cts 244 20 15 miles

1,515 14 Bridge 33 feet

300 00

SUMMARY of the estimate for common road forming on the Wes625 56

tern Division (beginning at Susquehanna) including Item 11. From Academy at Warren Tavern.

bridges, embankments and cuttings. Cut at Academy summit 15 feet base 20 ch,

Item 19. From the Susquehanna river to 15,765 cub yds at 15 cts

2,364 75
Millinger's

738 96 Sidelong excavation on 176 ch section 1 sq

18 yd, 3,872 at 6 cts

Millinger's to Seitz's

391 56 232 32 17 Seitz's to Hershey's

583 44 Two bridges 33 feet each

600 00

16 Double drain on 20 ch. single on 176 ch,

Hershey's to Senner's 4447 82

Senner's to Habacker's 2464 68 9,504 cub yds at 9 cts

855 36

Habacker's to station No. 9 2406 92 13

Station No. 9 to L.Conestoga 557 84 4,052 43

12 Item 12. From Warren to Howel's Ravine.

L. Conestoga to Sharp's 7065 40

11 Excavation on 9.69 ch x section 84 sq feet,

Sharp's to Mayer's

1261 34

10 4,637 cub yds at 6 cts

Mayer's to Big Conestoga 1351 42 278 22

9 Single drain on do. 10,106 cub yds at 6 cts

Big Conestoga to Becker
606 36
man's

24770 48 Embankment on 91 ch, 2,717 cub yds at 10c 271 70

Beckermen's to Guilbert's 3101 16 Six bridges of 66, 25, 150, 150, 5 and 25 feet 5,340 00

7

Guilbert's to Mill creek 1744 22 Bridge over ravine at Pennington's

6,980 00

6

Mill creek to Weaver's 15028 06 over ravine at Howel's

6,114 00
Weaver's to M'Caslins

642 04 4 M.Caslin's to Pequea creek

857 22 19,590 28 Item 13. From Howel's to Grover's.

Pequea creek to Aby's 9588 17 2 Aby's to the Gap

3975 40 Excavation on 368 ch, 7,421 cub yds at 6cts 445 26

Deep cut at the Gap 14173 60 Single drain on do 16,191 cub yds at 6 cts 971 46 Embankment on 6 ch, 1,860 cub yds at 10c 186 00

Eastern Division. Three bridges 4,400 00 1 From the Gap to Moor's

7367 60 2 Moore's to Cloud's

6083 36 6,002 72

3

Cloud's to Octararo summit 2093 02 Item 14. From Grover's to Mauld's ravine.

Octararo summit to Buck Excavation on 101 ch x section 6 sq ft, 1,481

run summit

19159 54 cub yds at 6 cts

88 86

Buck run summit to West Single drain on 101 ch, 4,444 cub yds at 6 cts 266 64

Brandywine

22943 20 Bridge over Mauld's ravine, covered

7,500 00

6 W. Brandywine to Gard-
ner's

751 50 7,855 50

7

Gardner's to East BrandyItem 15. From East side Mauld's ravine to

wine

21868 54 summit at Rudolph's.

8

East Brandywine to West Excavation on 138 ch, 3,343 cub yds at 6c 200 58

Valley creek

2432 14 Cut at Rudolph's 20 feet base 35 ch, 41,177

9

W. Valley creek to summit cub yds at 20 cts

8,235 40
at W. Horse

1435 14 Single drain on 138 ch. double do. on 35,

10 - Summit at W. Horse to 9,112 cub yds at 10 cts

Academy summit

625 26 Embankment on 6 ch, 3,893 cub yds at 150 583 95

11

Academy sůmmit to the
Bridge 33 feet

320 00
Warren

4052 43
12
Warren to Howel's

19590 28 10,250 93 13 Howel's to Grover's

6002 72 Item 16. From Rudolph's to end of section

14
Grover's to Mauld's

7855 50 35 as described in the preliminary report.

15

Mauld's to summit at RuDouble drain on 582 ch, 51,216 cub yds at

dolph's

10250 93 6 cts

3,072 96 16 - Rudolph's to section 35 5643 46 Embankment on 5 ch, 1,670 cub yds and

Total amount of cost of road from Columbia bridge 1,570 50 castward

233,357 35

9i1 20

106

COLUMBIA RAIL ROAD.

The distance being 84 miles, the average

cost per mile is $2761 62.

Estimate of the Eastern and Western divisions, between

Susquehanna and Schuylkill, exclusive of bridges.

Estimate for one mile of double railway.

[ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

2841 15

[blocks in formation]

Rolled iron bars of 2, inches wide by 3-8 of

an inch in thickness, are considered susti. cient for plating the inner edge of the wood. en rails. For the double track including sidelings or crossing places, one mile will require 30.55 tons, which can be drilled

and delivered at $93.per ton Stone blocks (granite, gneiss or limestone)

from 18 inches to 2 feet square, and from 2 to 3 feet long, placed eight feet apart, embedded, drilled and plugged, at 75 cts.

each 22000 feet oak timber 8 by 12 inches, to be

placed as rails upon the blocks, including

sidelings at 84 cents per foot Iron bolts 20 inches by 1 in diameter, for fix

ing the wooden rails to the stone blocks,

at 150 per ton, Five inch spikes for securing the iron bars to

the wooden rails, including the placing at

9 cents per pound Stoning the horse path-There are many

miles where the gravel side hills will render this expense unnecessary; but in taking the mean average and giving an incre. ment of length to the sidelings; both will cover all expenses incident to the public and farm roads crossing the line of railway and in filling up the slopes and counter slopes of the sidelings

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Total cost for 1 mile

[blocks in formation]

Average cost per mile, $11,824 65 Estimate of the Susquchanna River section. 15,64 ms. requiring 477.8 tons of bar iron, at

All the bridges under 150 feet in length of platform, $93 per ton

44,435 40

are calculated for double railway tracks in the estimate. do do 344,080 feet oak timber

The bridge over big Conestoga is also double, on acat 84 cts pr ft

29,246 80

count of its length;-all the others have only sngle: but do do 43,010 blocks of stone at

their breadth of platform which is 18 feet, will admit of 75 cts each

32,257 50 having a double line of road, if deemed necessary. do do 80.6 tons of bolts at 150

Various estimates have been given of a horse's power dols pr ton

12,090 00 of traction. Mr. Watts estimates the force of a horse's do do 31,712 lbs of spikes at 9

traction, at 150 lbs. when the horse goes at the rate of cts pr lb

2,854 08 24 miles an hour, and Mr. Treadgold gives it at 125 lbs. do do Stoning and preparing

when the velocity is 3 miles an hour for 6 hours of a day: the horse path at 350

but neither of these estimates appear to be the result of dols pr mile

5,474 00 actual experiment. Making due allowance for the differ.

ence in the strength of horses, in the different places 126,357 78 where the experiments were made, would scarcely ac

count for the discrepancies in these statements. The BRIDGES.

results of experiments made by Mr: Wced, of the per

formance of horses, and exhibited in the tables in his 501 ft of double and 100 ft of single bridges,

treatise on rail-roads, are much more satisfactory. Tak. requiring 7.8 ts iron 379 44 ing the force of a horses traction, travelling twenty miles do 2,204 feet oak timber at

per day, at the rate of 2 miles an hour, to be equal to 18 cts

187 3.4 112 lbs. may be considered as a correct estimate of his do do Iron fastenings for timber 30 00

power. Mr. Wood derives also from a number of ex. do do 203 lbs spikes at 9 cents

periments, satisfactory coincidence of the amount of the 18 27 friction of carriages moving upon edge rails: the result

is, that with wheels of which the ratio of the diameter to

126,972 83 that of the axle is 12:1, the total resistance will be .02 Add cost of road forming

23,863 43 part of the weight of the whole carriage and lcad.
150,836 31

If the friction of this carriage be taken at the 200th Add for contingencies 10 per cent

15,083 63 part of its weight, then the weight which will present a

resistance of 112 lbs. upon the edge ral will bc 22,400 165,919 94

lbs. or ten tons, conveyed on a level rail road, twenty

miles per day, travelling at the rate of 9 miles per hour. Average cost per mile $10,534 59.

This expresses only the relation of the effort to the effect

do

per lb

[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

y between vridges

64,6

Graduation

per mile

Ascending
Graduation
per mile
Descending

[ocr errors]

is.

1, slopes.

on a level
on ascents the resistance is increased, and

TABLE
ne effect of the effort of the moving body must be con-
Jerably diminished. In the theorems given by recent

Exhibiting the distance, ascending and descending grawriters on this subject, the weight of the moving power

duations, commencing at the Susquehanna river, and

tracing the line eastward. 257,405, which had been heretofore omitted by Treadgold and

others, is considered as bearing too great a proportion to 172,342, the whole load, to be neglected in the equation.

WESTERN DIVISION. 156,257

In calculating the value of the performance of a horse ) on the varied ascents from the Susquehanna river to

te Amount of Tonnage, or value Schuylkill, the amounts of tonnage stated in the table

of the power of 1 horse on the

Chains. forming a part of this report, and which are placed op.

Ascents, as derived from the posite to each ascending graduation, are deducted froin

equation H (e-sine 13)15,47 the following formula, which may be applied in calcu

W (fa-t sine I.) 29,24

lating the eifect of either the locomotive engine or horse power.

8 85.35

3.12 675,1. In comparing the results obtained for the latter, with 7 147.56

2.56 E, 1 some of the experiments specified in Mr. Wood's tables, 6 81.96

Level. W 20 H - 10 tons. they are found to represent the effect of the power of 5 78.25

Level.

Do. the horse, as below the actual performance.

4 273.53

1.36 3 265.66

1.04 First for the engine_let E represent the weight of the

2 85-49

3.84 engine, and e be that fractional part of its weight, which

1 240.00 Level. produces the progressive motion of the engine wheels

In passing Chickey's rock, this

to be hereafter graduated. Icks

upon the rails: then E. e. will represent the engine's 19 160.00 18.00 Sine inclination 1-293 : load force of traction upon the level.

5.95 tons. Let I be the angle of inclination.

18 20.00 130.00 Fixed engine, length of plane

hereafter regulated. W the weight of the wagons and load.

17| 89.00 13.68 Sine I 1-335 : load 6.55 tons. of the friction at the axle of the wagons, when the 16 88.66

16.16 pressure is 1.

15 66.33

5.19 141 93.00

18.00 d the d'améter of the wheel when that of the axle is 1.

13 213.00

16.08 The general equation which expresses the relations of

12 80.00

27.33 2 these quantities, is E (e + sin I) =W (f:d-Esin I.)

11 120.00 18.16 Sine I 1-292 : load 5.85 tons. The upper signs give the equation for ascending

10123.00

0.87

9 136.00 slopes, and the lower that required for descending

21,12 8 146.00 27.50 Sine I 1-192 : load 4.81 tons.

7 186.00 7.18 Sine I 1-755 : load 8.35 tons. Taking an ascending graduation of 27} feet to the 6 84.00

18.08 mile, and which may be considered as the highest num 5 284.00 13.81 sine I 1-381 : load 6.45 tons. ber on our line; the anount of tɔnnage which a locomo 4 136.00 7.36 Sine I 1-717 : load 7.78 tons. tive engine can drag up this ascent, may be formed thus: 3 122.001 Level. W

20 H 10 tons.

2 340.00 27.50 Sine I 1-192 : load 4.81 tons. Let E be taken 7 tons. By Vi. Wood, € -- 1-25 and

11162.001 29.041 Sine I 1-181 : load 4.66 tons. f2e1-200 : sine of 1-1-192 (27} to the mile) then 7(1-95 — 1-192)-W(1-200 +- 1-192.)

EASTERN DIVISION. 7-25 - 7-199=1169-4890=392-3840 : and W' - 23.9 tons, which the engine can drag up an ascent of 275 ft. 1,235.001

20.32 to the mile.

2 131.26 16.00 Sine I 1-330 : load 6.61 tons. If the effort of a horse at any velocity, be represented

3 231.37 7.92 Sine I 1-666 : load 7.65 tons.

23.04 by 1-10th of his weight or 112 lbs. he will on a level drag

4 242.66
5 257.00

27.50 twenty tirnes his weight, or 10 tons: and the inclination

6 150.33 Level.

W at which his load, with the same velocity, ought to be

20 H - 10 tons. 7 458.00

16.24 one half, or only ten times his weight, is 1-206 or 25-63 feet to the mile. Taking the maximum rate of gradua

8 361.64 12.34 Sine I 1.427 : load 6.76 tons.

9 226.50 10.32 tion as before, at 27) feet to the mile, the ainount of ton

Sine I 1.511 :load 7.14 tons.

Sine 1 1-227 : load 5.23 tons. nage corresponding to this ascent, is found to be as fol. 10 93.50 23.29

11 199.00

12.56 lows:

12 260.00

2.32 The effort of a horse in carrying a load, is assumed to 13 380.00 15.25 Sine I 1.346 : load 6.26 tons. have to his power of traction, the ratio of 3 to 1: or sine 14 110.00 23.00) $, is substituted for sine 1, in the first number of the 15 176.00 9.97 ISine I 1-529 : load 7.25 tons. equation.

16 602.001

15.481 Using the upper signs; the equation is II or 1120 (1-10

84 miles 48 chains. --sine ;)=W (1-200 +1-192.) 112 - 1120-576 W. 392-38400 and W- 107,809

There are three points upon the line between Jine Ibs. 4.81 tons.

Ridge and Schuylkill river, where stationary steam pow. By a slight modification in the same formula, it can be er could be advantageously placed. They are, at the applied in ascertaining the most advantageous inclination Gap on line Ridge, the summit between Viest Brandywhich a rail road ought to have, when the amount of wine, and at a po nt about a mile northwest of the Spread transportation in going and returning, bears a known Eagle tavern on the Philadelphia turnpike. Not only proportion. It is unnecessary however, to give it a place would the line be shortened 25 miles, and the graduain this report, as the surface over which our line passes, tions from these points be diminished, but the saving in will prevent the application of it.

expense in the first cost of the railway, would a nountio

.

108

MISCELLANEOUS.

(FER.

[ocr errors]

about fifty thousand dollars. I am not, however, at pre- when he came she sayd there was a great Light but just sent prepared to say, whether this difference of cost, before and an old woman with a knife in her hand at ye would be an equivalent to that of maintaining and keep- Bedds feet and therefore shee cryed out and desired Jno. ing in repair, the steam engines. This will form a sub-Symcock to take away his calves or else she would send ject for consideration and calculation upon the location them to Hell. of the road.

James Claypoole attested Interpritor betwixt the ProIn tracing the lines as detailed in the different sections pr. and the Prisoner. in the preliminary report submitted to the board, the The affidavid of Jno. Vanculin read, Charles Ashcom operation was so conducted as to render the expense of being a witness to it. forming the road, a moderate one.

Annakey Coolin attested saith her husband tooke the In some instances, embankments and cuttings were heart of a calfe that dyed as they thought by witchcraft avoided, the expense of which, however, in the actual and Boyled it whereupon the Prisoner at ye Barr came location, would have been equivalent to the increased in and asked them what they were doing, they said boy, length of railway.

ling of flesh, she said they had better they had boyled I have, therefore, no hesitation in saying, that in the the bones with severall other unseemly Expressions. final location of the line from Columbia to Philadelphia, Margaret Mattson saith that she values not Drystreets the amount of distance derived, in adding together the Evidence but if Saunderlins mother had come she would lengths of the various sections in the table, may be con- have answered her also denyeth Charles Ashcoins attessidered as the true length of the line of railway from tation at her soul and saith where is my daughter lett Susquehanna to Schuylkill rivers.

her come and say so. All which is respectfully submitted.

Annakey Coolings attestation concerning the Gees. Signed,

she denyeth saying she was never out of her conco, and

JOHN WILSON. also that she never said any such things concerning the Philadelphia, Jan. 12, 1828.

calves heart.

Jno. Cock attested, sayeth he knows nothing of the TRIAL OF A WITCH,

matter. Tho. Baldings attestation was read, and Tho. In our first number we published the indictment of Bracy attested, saith it is a true coppy, two persons for witchcraft. The “Blairsville Record” nesses speake only by hear say:

The Prisoner denyeth all things and saith that ye withas published the whole trial, copied from the records After which ye Govr. gave the jury their charge cenat Harrisburgh by a correspondent, and is as follows: cerning ye Prisoner at ye Barr. It appears the charge of the Governor is not to be found. her in Guilty of having the common fame of a witch, but

The jury went forth and upon their Returne brought "At a Council held at Philadelphia ye 27th of the 12th not Guilty in the manner and forme as she stands inmonth 1683.

dicted. Present

Neels Mattson and Anthon. Neelson Enters into ReWm. Penn, Propr. and Govr.

cognizance of fifty pounds a peice for the good behavior James Harrison

Chris. Taylor

of Margaret Mattson for six months. Wm. Biles Wm. Clayton

Book 1. Page 45. Lasse Cock

Tho. Holmes Wm. Haigue

CHRIST CHURCH STEEPLE AND BELLS. The Grand jury being attested. The Govr, gave them their charge and the Atturney Gen. all attended

Almost every stranger who visits our city, immediately them with the presentmt. Their names are as followed.

Robt. Euer, foreman, Saml, Carpenter, Andrew Gris- remarks, as a defect, “that we have no steeples.” It com, Benj. Whiteman, Jno. Barnes, Saml. Allen, Jno. is remarkable, that so little attention has been paid to Parsons, Rich. Orne, Jno. Day, Jno. ffisher, Jno. Barnes, this subject in our city, while every other city and almost Gunner Rambo, Enock flower, Henr. Drystreet, Tho. every country town, presents one or more steeples as the Mosse, Tho. Duckett, Dennis Lince, Tho. Phillips, first objects which strike the attention of the traveller

, Tho. Millard, Jno. Yattman, Harnaby Wilcox. Postmeridiem.

and inform him of his approach to the place of his destiThe Grand jury made their return and found the Bill. nation. Every person who has travelled through New Ordered that those that were absent of the Petty jury England, has no doubt experienced great pleasure on should be fined 40s. each man.

Margarit Matson’s Indictment was read aud she pleads entering the numerous villages in the summer season, not guilty and will be tryed by the countrey.

from the beautiful contrast of the white steeple and green Lasse Cock attested Interpriter between the Propr. foliage. There are about 90 houses of public worship and the Prisoner at the Barr. The Petty Jury Impanneled their names are as follow- much expense and care are devoted to the embellish.

in this city, and only two or three steeples. Where so ed.

Jno. Hasting, foreman, Robt, Wade, Wm. Hewes, Jno. ment of the city by public buildings, we presume it Gibbons, Albortus Hendrickson, Nath. Evans, Jer. Col. would not be impracticable to raise a sufficient sum, for lett, Walter Martin, Robert Piles, Edwd. Carter, Kins- the purpose of adding steeples to some of the churches, man, Jno. Edwd. Bezac. Henry Drystreet attested, saith he was tould 20 years

if proper measures were adopted, and the congregations agoe that the prisoner at the Barr was a witch and that are not able to do it from their own resources. severall cows were bewitcht by her, also that James mer times, our ancesters had more pride on this subject Saunderling's mother tould that she bewitcht her cow but afterwards said it was a mistake and that her cow

or more liberality, than we appear to possess. So long should doe well againe for it was not her cow but another ago as 1754, Christ Church Steeple was erected, and in persons that should dye.

the same year, an agreement was made for the stecple Charles Ashcom attested, saith, that Anthony's wife that formerly was attached to the 2d Presbyterian Church. being asked why she sould her cattle was because he In looking over a file of papers for 1755, we met with mother had bewitcht them having taken the witchcraft of of Hendricks cattle and put it on their, Oxon she the following account of the cost of Christ Church Stemyght keep but noe other cattle; and also that one night ple and Bells, which has induced us to make the forethe Daughter of the Prisoner called him up hastely and going remarks. The bells it appcars were employed,

In for.

« PreviousContinue »