Walter Colyton: A Tale of 1688, Volume 1

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H. Colburn and R. Bentley, 1830 - Great Britain
 

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Page 257 - In following him, I follow but myself; Heaven is my judge, not I for love and duty, But seeming so, for my peculiar end : For when my outward action doth demonstrate The native act and figure of my heart In compliment extern, 'tis not long after But I will wear my heart upon my sleeve For daws to peck at : I am not what I am.
Page 60 - I'll call thee Hamlet, King, father, royal Dane : O, answer me ! Let me not burst in ignorance ; but tell Why thy canonized bones, hearsed in death, Have burst their cerements ; why the sepulchre, Wherein we saw thee quietly inurn'd, Hath oped his ponderous and marble jaws, To cast thee up again.
Page 308 - In the most high and palmy state of Rome, A little ere the mightiest Julius fell, The graves stood tenantless, and the sheeted dead Did squeak and gibber in the Roman streets...
Page 145 - PHA. I hold her wit? The strength of all the guard cannot hold it, if they were tied to it; she would blow 'em out of the kingdom. They talk of Jupiter; he's but a squib-cracker to her: look .well about you, and you may find a tongue-bolt.
Page 235 - I can't end my letter without telling you that lady Sunderland plays the hypocrite more than ever, for she goes to St. Martin's church morning and afternoon, because there are not people enough to see her at Whitehall chapel...
Page 221 - And the curbed thunder grumbles to be gone. Enter GRILLON to him. Gril. Tis just the appointed hour you bid me wait. King. So just, as if thou wert inspired to come ; As if the guardian-angel of my throne, Who had o'erslept himself so many years, Just now was roused, and brought thee to my rescue. Gril. I...
Page 199 - Fall darkness then, and everlasting night Shadow the Globe; may the Sun never dawn, The Silver Moon be blotted from her Orb; And for an Universal rout of Nature...
Page 235 - Whitehall chapel, and is half an hour before other people come, and half an hour after everybody is gone, at her private devotions. She runs from church to church after the famousest preachers, and keeps such a clatter with her devotions that it really turns one's stomach. Sure there never was a couple so well matched as she and her good husband; for as she is throughout in all her actions the greatest jade that ever was, so he is the subtilest working villain that is on the face of the earth.
Page 235 - Martin's morning and afternoon, (because there are not people enough to see her at Whitehall Chapel,) and is half an hour before other people come, and half an hour after everybody is gone, at her private devotions.

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