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coordination among geologic, hydrologic, astronomic, atmospheric, and oceanographic organizations in order to promote earth science education, to provide a united voice on national and regional education issues, and to establish the role of earth science in reforming interdisciplinary, hands-on science teaching. As part of its continuing educational outreach program efforts, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) hosted representatives from 57 organizations at the second annual CESE national meeting, March 4–6, 1994, in Reston, Va. The theme of the meeting was “Supporting Systemic Reform in Science Education.” Attendees were brought up to date on Project 2061 of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Scope Sequence and Coordination project of the National Science Teachers Association, the State Systemic Initiatives of the National Science Foundation, and the new National Science Standards from the National Academy of Sciences and the National Research Council. Meeting participants heard talks on Federal Government initiatives like the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Project Weather Scope and two projects of the USGS's innovative CDROM program—one on the hazards of volcanic ash clouds to aviation entitled “Tracking Stone Winds” and the other a multimedia educational system on global environmental change for middle-school students entitled GeoMedia 2. Presentations on exemplary initi

atives from the academic community included the Joint Education Initiative of the University of Maryland, the Denver Earth Science Project of the Colorado School of Mines, the Iowa Demonstration Classroom Project of Luther College, and the Program for Leadership in Earth Systems Education of Ohio State University. Presentations on teacher enhancement and material development programs from earth science societies were given by such prestigious organizations as the Geological Society of America, the American Astronomical Society, the American Meteorological Society, the American Geophysical Union, and the American Geological Institute. The highlight of the meeting was a panel discussion on “The View from the Classroom.” A panel consisting of teachers from elementary school through undergraduate school and a museum educator discussed current and future needs of earth science teachers and educators. Panelists confirmed the need for local and regional support for the classroom teacher. Teacher-scientist partnerships—two professionals merging their skills for the betterment of science—were hailed as the most effective way to enact true reforms in teaching science. The discussion also emphasized the need for teacher enhancement programs that bring teachers up to date on current relevant science and thus paved the way for additional discussions on the role of CESE and its member organizations in forging programs for the future.

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Budget Information

he U.S. Geological Survey receives funding through direct appropriations and reimbursable work. The following table

reflects a FY 94 budget authority of $596.985 million to program element level. (Percentage of total funds by activity: Facilities, 3; General Administration, 3; Geologic and Mineral Resource Surveys and Mapping, 29; National Mapping, Geography, and Surveys, 19; Water Resources Investigations, 45. Computer Services are 1 percent.)

Activity/subactivity/program element o:d Activity/subactivity/program element FY o, National Mapping, Geography, and Surveys............ $136,725 Water Resources Investigations..................................... $187,561 National Map and Digital Data Production.................. 61,279 National Water Resources Research and Information Cartographic Data and Map Revision....................... 46,321 System-Federal Program...................................... . 118,303 Thematic and Special Data......................................... 12,766 Data Collection and Analysis......................... 19,843 National Map and Digital Data Cooperative National Water Information Clearinghouse 962 Program.... 2,192 Coordination of National Water Data Activities....... 1,488 Information and Data Systems....................................... 24,024 Regional Aquifer System Analysis............................. 5,064 National Data Base Management............................... 12,154 Core Program Hydrologic Research.......................... 10,008 Information Dissemination Services.......................... 4,433 Improved Instrumentation.......................................... 1,147 Global Change Data Systems -- 7,437 Water Resources Assessment 1,565 Research and Technology................................................ 18,769 Toxic Substances Hydrology...................................... 14,178 Cartographic and Geographic Research ................... 8,515 Acid Rain..... 1,873 National Cartographic Requirements, Scientific and Technical Publications......................... 2,305 Coordination, and Standards................................. 5,073 National Water-Quality Assessment Program........... 51,822 Geographic and Spatial Information Analysis.......... 5,181 Global Change Hydrology............................. ---- 6,649 Advanced Cartographic Systems.................................... 32,653 Truckee-Carson Program............................................ 1,399 National Water Resources Research and Information cour*** ---------- 223,531 System—Federal-State Cooperative Program........ 63,488 Geologic Hazards Surveys... ... 77,008 Data Collection and Analysis, Areal Appraisals, Earthquake Hazards Reductions........ 54,361 and Special Studies.................................................. 59,438 Volcano and Geothermal Investigations... -- 20,315 water Use - 4,050 Landslide Hazards.................................. ... 2,332 National Water Resources Research and Information Geologic Framework and Processes... 27,588 System–State Research Institutes and Research - - - -- o Grants Program....................................................... 5,770 National Geologic Mapping -------- ... 23,012 State Water Resources Research Institutes................ 5,529 Deep Continental Studies....................... 2,772 Program Administration.............................................. 24l Magnetic Field Monitoring and Charting 1,804 Global Change and Climate History......... 10,788 General Administration................................................... 26,018 Global Change and Climate History. -- 10,788 Executive Direction......................................................... 7,935 Marine and Coastal Geologic Surveys....... ... 35,635 Administrative Operations.............................................. 8,719 Marine and Coastal Geologic Surveys....................... 35,635 Reimbursements to the Department of Labor. - 2,462 Mineral Resource Surveys.............................................. 46,902 Payments to Others for Services..................................... 273 Mineral Resource Surveys ... 46,902 Washington Administrative Service Center................... 6,629 Energy Resource Surveys................................................ 25,610 Facilities 23,150 Energy Resource Surveys............................................ 25,610 National Center—Rental Payments to GSA................... 20,045 National Center-Facilities Management....................... 3,105 Total, SIR............................................... $596,985

Total includes $4.5 M supplemental for the Northridge earthquake and $78 M supplemental for flooding in the Midwest.

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The following table reflects actual obligations from all sources of funds. In FY94, the U.S. Geolog: ical Survey had actual obligations of $886.1 million, distributed as follows: $586.5 million from direct appropriations, $5.5 million from estimated receipts from map sales, and $294.1 million from reimbursements.

|Dollars in thousands]

Budget activity 1991 1992 1993 1994

Total $802,538 $851,979 $862,335 $886,093 Direct program 575,044 586,699 582,891 1586,505 Reimbursable program 227,494 265,280 279,444 299,588 States, counties, municipalities 87,415 89,950 91,299 93,270 Miscellaneous non-Federal sources 13,499 14,609 14,842 13,572 Other Federal agencies 126,580 160,721 173,303 206,526 National Mapping 162,421 164,981 156,898 165,507 Direct program 132,395 132,612 126,092 129,406 Reimbursable program 30,026 32,369 30,806 36,101 States, counties, and municipalities 2,366 3,028 3,219 2,771 Miscellaneous non-Federal sources 9,722 10,633 10,562 9,174 Other Federal agencies 17,938 18,708 17,025 24,156 Geologic 261,513 267,642 261,089 259,485 Direct program 225,112 225,383 222,565 219,220 Reimbursable program 36,401 42,259 38,524 40,265 States, counties, municipalities 2,661 3,077 1,609 1,607 Miscellaneous non-Federal sources 1,260 536 834 687 Other Federal agencies 32,480 38,646 36,081 37,971 Water Resources 32,480 363,287 384,467 400,122 Direct program 177,969 184,489 186,933 188,631 Reimbursable program 155,269 178,798 197.534 211,491 States, counties, municipalities 82,388 83,845 86,471 88,892 Miscellaneous non-Federal sources 2,503 3,424 3,440 3,706 Other Federal agencies 70,378 91,529 107,623 118,893 General Administration 21,528 25,028 25,886 28,765 Direct program 21,206 23,883 24,506 25,951 Reimbursable program 322 1,145 1,380 2,814 Miscellaneous non-Federal sources 1 1 1 2 Other Federal agencies 321 1,144 1,379 2,812 Facilities 18,314 20,304 23,111 23,368 Direct program 18,314 20,304 22,750 23,282 Reimbursable program 0 () 361 86 Computer and Administrative Services 5,476 10,709 10,839 8,831 Reimbursable program 54,76 10,709 10,839 8,831 Miscellaneous non-Federal sources 13 15 5 3 Other Federal agencies 5,463 10,694 10,834 8,828 Operation and Maintenance of Quarters 48 28 45 15 Direct program 48 28 45 15 Working Capital Fund 13,780 Reimbursable program 13,780

"Includes actual obligations of $584,484 for current year, $1,887 for no-year and multi-year funds, $119 for contributed funds, and $15 for Operation and Maintenance of Quarters.

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was reimbursed for work performed for other Federal, State, and local agencies whose need for earth science expertise complements USGS program objectives. Cooperative agreements with more than 1,000 Federal, State, and local agencies and the academic community support a large share of USGS research and investigations. Work for State, county, and municipal agencies is most often conducted on a cost-sharing basis. The following table provides detailed information on the particular agencies for which the USGS performs work.

|Dollars in thousands]

Source of funds 1991 1992 1993 1994

Department of Agriculture................................................. $3,464 $3,714 $2,697 $5,620
Department of Commerce................................................. 323 9 103 196
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration... 2,258 5,146 1,630 1,414
Department of Defense...................................................... 42,002 56,461 64,518 71,281
Department of Energy........................................................ 28,521 30,679 33,651 38,309
Bonneville Power Administration................................. 159 217 445 481

Department of the Interior
Bureau of Indian Affairs................................................. 1,834 1,347 88.1 1,462
Bureau of Land Management........................................ 1,256 1,508 1,797 1,535
Bureau of Mines..... 0 0 0 64
Bureau of Reclamation................................................... 6,259 5,990 6,495 7,133
Minerals Management Service...................................... 76 207 107 50
National Park Service..................................................... 1,036 1,107 1,111 2,158
Office of the Secretary.................................................... 1,549 1,551 1,298 1,159
Office of Surface Mining................................................ 67 8 22 0
Fish and Wildlife Service................................................ 456 733 379 586
Department of State................. 8,279 10,524 13,333 10,030
Department of Transportation....... -- 299 661 605 770
Environmental Protection Agency........... -- 4,302 6,414 7,671 10,422
Federal Emergency Management Agency......... 1,927
National Aeronautics and Space Administration 6,270 9,589 10,108 11,068
National Science Foundation...... 625 1,838 2,096 1,252
Nuclear Regulatory Commission. -- 1,441 539 1,087 870
Tennessee Valley Authority........ -- 200 275 4.17 437
Miscellaneous Federal agencies......................................... 15,904 22,204 22,852 38,302
Total $126,580 $160,721 $173,303 $206,526

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Guide to Information and Publications

Earth Science Information Centers

To obtain information on cartographic data and on earth-science programs, publications, and services, or to obtain copies of reports and maps, write or visit U.S. Geological Survey Earth Science Information Centers at the following addresses:

Alaska:
Room 101
4230 University Dr.
Anchorage, AK99508–4664

California:
Bldg. 3, Room 3128
345 Middlefield Rd., Mail Stop 532
Menlo Park, CA 94025–3591

Colorado:
Bldg. 25, Room 1813
Box 25046
Denver Federal Center, Mail Stop 504
Denver, CO 802.25-0046

District of Columbia:

Main Interior Bldg., Room 2650
1849 C St., NW
Washington, DC 20240
(Use E St. entrance.)

Mississippi:
Bldg. 3101
Stennis Space Center, MS 39529

Missouri:

1400 Independence Rd., Mail Stop 231
Rolla, MO 65401–2602

South Dakota:

EROS Data Center
Sioux Falls, SD 57.198–0001

Utah:

2222 West 2300 South
Salt Lake City, UT 84119

Virginia:
Room 1C402
507 National Center
12201 Sunrise Valley Dr.
Reston, VA 22092

Washington:
U.S. Post Office Bldg., Room 135
904 West Riverside Ave.
Spokane, WA 99201–1088

Earth Science and Environmental
Information on the Internet

Selected USGS information and
products are available on the Internet at
the following Uniform Resource Locator:

http://www.usgs.gov

Additional information on Mosaic may be
obtained by e-mailing questions to:

webmastergwww.usgs.gov

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