An Epitome of the Criminal Law

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Reeves and Turner, 1885 - Criminal law - 248 pages

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Page 55 - And be it enacted, that if any person shall unlawfully take, or cause to be taken, any unmarried girl, being under the age of sixteen years, out of the possession and against the will of her father...
Page 47 - ... whensoever the death of a person shall be caused by wrongful act, neglect or default, and the act, neglect or default is such as would (if death had not ensued) have entitled the party injured to maintain an action and recover damages in respect thereof...
Page 34 - When a Man doth compass or imagine the Death of our Lord the King, or of our Lady his Queen, or of their eldest Son and Heir...
Page 159 - ... shall cause the charge to be reduced into writing and read to the person charged, and then address a question to him to the following effect : "Do you desire to be tried by a jury. or do you consent to the case being dealt with summarily...
Page 49 - Express malice is when one, with a sedate deliberate mind and formed design, doth kill another : which formed design is evidenced by external circumstances discovering that inward intention; as lying in wait, antecedent menaces, former grudges, and concerted schemes to do him some bodily harm.
Page 115 - Every person who, with a view to compel any other person to abstain from doing or to do any act which such other person has a legal right to do or abstain from doing, wrongfully and without legal authority,— 1.
Page 69 - ... to the common gaol or house of correction, there to be imprisoned only, or to be imprisoned and kept to hard labour...
Page 131 - ... offer to divide the article into three parts to be then and there separated, and each part to be marked and sealed or fastened up in such manner as its nature will permit...
Page 105 - This general law is founded upon this principle — that different nations ought In time of peace to do one another all the good they can, and in time of war as little harm as possible, without prejudice to their own real interests.
Page 35 - Or if a Man do levy War against our Lord the King in his Realm, or be adherent to the King's Enemies in his Realm, giving to them Aid and Comfort in the Realm or elsewhere...

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