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It is represented by the Oregon delegation in Congress that this reservation is un. Decessarily large, and that by reason of it access to the harbor of Acquinna Bay by the numerous setlers in the fertile and productive valley of the Willamette is prevented. They ask for a curtailment of this reservation, so as to secure to the inhabitants of the Willamette Valley the much-needed access to the coast, and for this purpose propose that a small and rugged portion of the reservation in the vicinity of Acquinpa Bay, not occupied or desired by the Indians, shall be released and thrown open to occupation and use by the whites.

The Commissioner of Indian Affairs is of the opinion that the interests of the citizens of Oregon will be promoted by the opening of a port of entry at Acqninpa Bay, and that their interest is paramount in importance to that of the Indians located in that vieinity. Concurring in the views expressed by the Hon. Messrs. Nesmith, Williams, and Henderson, and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, I respectfully recommend that an order be made by you releasing from reservation for Indian purposes and restoring to public use the portion of the said reservation bounded on the accompanying map by double red lines, and described in the communication of the Oregon delegation as follows, viz: Commencing at a point two miles south of the Siletz Agency; thence west to the Pacific Ocean ; tbeuce south along said ocean to the mouth of the Alcea River; thence up said river to the eastern boundary of the reservation; thence porth along said eastern boundary to a point due east of the place of beginning; thence west to the place of beginning. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. HARLAN,

Secretary. The PRESIDENT.

EXECUTIVE Mansion, December 21, 1865. The recommendation of the Secretary of the Interior is approved, and the tract of land within described will be released from reservation and thrown open to occupancy and use by the citizens as other public land.

ANDREW JOHNSON,

President

Wallorca Valley Reserve.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,
OFFICE OF INDIAN AFFAIRS,

June 9, 1873. The above diagram is intended to show a proposed reservation for the roaming Nez Percé Indians in the Wallowa Valley, in the State of Oregon. Said proposed reservation is indicated on the diagram by red lines, and is described as follows, viz: Commencing at the right bank of the mouth of Grande Ronde River; thence up Snake River to a point due east of the southeast corner of township No. 1 south of the base line of the surveys in Oregon, in range No 46 east of the Willamette meridian; thence from said point due west to the west Fork of the Wallowa River; thence down said West Fork to its junction with the Wallowa River; thence down said river to its confluence with the Grande Ronde River; thence down the last-named river to the place of beginning.

I respectfully recommend that the President be requested to order that the lands comprised within the above-described limits be with held from entry and settlement as pablic lands, and that the same be set apart as an Indian reservation, as indicated in my report to the department of tbis date.

EDWARD P. SMITH,

Commissioner

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

June 11, 1873. Respectfally presented to the President, with the recommendation that he make the order above proposed by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs.

C. DELANO,

Secretary.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, June 16, 1873. It is hereby ordered that the tract of country above described be withheld from entry and settlement as public lands, and that the same be set apart as a reservatiou for the roaming Nez Percé Indians, as recommended by the Secretary of the Interior and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs.

U. S. GRANT.

Wallowa Valley Reserve.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, June 10, 1875. It is hereby ordered that the order dated June 16, 1873, withdrawing from sale and settlement and setting apart the Wallowa Valley, in Oregon, described as follows: Com. mencing at the right bank of the mouth of Grande Ronde River; thence up Snake River to a point due east of the southeast corner of township No. 1 south of the base line of the surveys in Oregon, in range No. 46 east of the Willamette meridian; thence from said point due west to the West Fork of the Wallowa River; thence down said West Fork to its junction with the Wallowa River; thence down said river to its confluence with the Grande Ronde River; thence down the last-named river to the place of beginning, as an Indian reservation, is hereby revoked and annulled, and the said described tract of country is hereby restored to the public domain.

U. S. GRANT.

UTAH.
Uintah Valley Reserve.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, October 3, 1861. SIR: I have the honor herewith to submit for your consideration the recommendation of the Acting Commissioner of Indian Affairs, that the Uintah Valley, in the Territory of Utah, be set apart and reserved for the use and occupancy of Indiau tribes."

In the absence of an authorized survey (the valley and surrounding country being as yet unoccupied by settlements of our citizens!, I respectfully recommend that you order the entire valley of the Uintah River, within Utah Territory, exteuding on both sides of said river to the crest of the first range of contiguous niountains on each side, to be reserved to the United States and set apart as an Indian reservation. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CALEB B. SMITH,

Secretary. The PRESIDENT.

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, October 3, 1861. Let the reservation be established, as recommended by the Secretary of the Interior.

A. LINCOLN. ---- -

WASHINGTON TERRITORY.

Chehalis Reserve.
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,
OFFICE OF INDIAN AFFAIRS,

May 17, 1864. SIR: I bave the honor to submit for your direction in the premises, sundry communications and papers from Superintendent Hale, in reference to a proposed reservation for the Chebalis Indians in Washington Territory.

The condition of these Indians has been the subject of correspondence between this office and the superintendent of Indian affairs in Washington Territory for several years. It will be seen by Superintendent Hale's letter of July 3, 1862, that the country claimed by these Indians is large, comprising some 1,500 square miles; that they have never been treated with, but that the government has surveyed the greater part of it without their consent, and in the face of their remonstrances, and the choicest portions of their lands have been occupied by the whites without any remuneration to them, and without their consent, or having relinquished their claim or right to it. They bave been thus crowded out and excluded from the use of the lands claimed by them, and those which they bave heretofore cultivated for their support. This has caused much dissatisfaction, and threatens serious trouble, and they manifest a determination not to be forced from what they claim as their own country. After various propositions made to them by Superintendent Hale, looking to their removal and joint occapation of other Indian reservations, to all which they strenuously objected, they ex. pressed a willingness to relinquish all the lands hitherto claimed by them, provided they shall not be removed, and provided that a sufficient quantity of land shall be retained by them at the mouth of Black River as a reservation.

The selection herein made in accordance with their wishes, and approved by Superintendent Hale, reduces the dimensions of their former claim to about six sections of land, with which they are satisfied, and which selection has been submitted to this office for its approval. There seems one drawback only to this selection, and that is one private land claim-that of D. Mounts—which it is proposed to purchase. The price asked is $3,500, which he considers not unreasonable. (See his communication of March 30, 1863, and accompanying papers.)

There is remaining on hand of the appropriation for "intercourse with various Indian tribes having no treaties with the United States" the sum of $3,980.12, a sufficient amount of which I have no doubt might appropriately be applied for the purpose indicated. (See U. S. Statutes at Large, vol. 12, page 792.)

I am of the opinion that the proposition is a fair one for the government, and, as it is satisfactory to the Indians interested, I see no objection to its approval by the department, especially so when it is considered that it will peaceably avert impending trouble.

As recommended in the letters herewith submitted, it will also be necessary, doubtless, to make some provision for them, after they shali have been assured of the quiet and permanent possession of the proposed reservation for a futu re home. But this may subsequently receive the attention of the department. These Indians are represented to be in a very bopeful condition. They wish to abandon a roving life; to establish themselves in houses, and cultivate their lands; to educate their children, and live peaceably with all.

These papers are submitted for your information in considering the subject, and, if it sball commend itself to your judgment, for the approval of the proposed selection as a reservation for these Indians and the purchase of the private land claim of D. Mounts thereon. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

· WM. P. DOLE,

Commissioner. Hop. J. P. USHER,

Secretary of the Interior.

Boundaries of the Chebalis Indian Reservation, as compiled from the field-notes of the public surveys in the office of the surveyor-general of Washington Territory, beginning at the post-corner to sections 1 and 2, 35 and 36 on the township line between town. ships No. 15 and 16 north, of range 4 west of the Willamette meridian, being the northeast corner of the reservation ; thence west along the township line 240 chains to the post-corner to sections 4, 5, 32 and 33; thence north on line between sections 32 and 33, 26.64 chains, to the southeast corner of James H. Roundtree's donation claim; thence west along the south boundary of said claim 71.50 chains to its southwest corner; thence north on west boundary of the claim 13.10 chains; thence west 8.50 chains to the quarter-section post on line of sections 31 and 32; thence north along said section line 40.00 chains to the post-corner to sections 29, 30, 31 and 32; thence west on line between sections 30 and 31, 25 and 36, 101.24 chains to the Chehalis River; thence up the Chehalis River with its meanderings, keeping to the south of Sand Island, to the post on the right bank of the river, being the corner to fractional sections 1 and 2 ; tbence north on the line between sections 1 and 2, 73.94 chains to the place of beginning.

The copy of the field-notes in full, as taken froin the record of the public surveys now on file in this office, and from which the above is compiled, is duly certified as being correct by the surveyor-general of the Territory.

OFFICE SUPERINTENDENT INDIAN AFFAIRS,

Olympia, Wash. Ter., December 10, 1863. The within and foregoing boundaries, as described in the notes and accompanying diagram of the proposed Chebalis Indian reservation, are approved by me as correct, and being in accordance with instructions given by me, the same being subject to the approval of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs.

C. H HALE, Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Ilashington Territory.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, D. C., July 8, 1864. Sir: I return berewith the papers submitted with your report of the 17th May last in relation to a proposed reservation for the Chehalis Indians in Washington Territory.

I approve the suggestion made in relation to the subject, and you are hereby authorized and instructed to purchase the improvements of D. Mounts which are on the lands selected for the reservation, if it can now be done for the price named for them, viz, $3,500, including the crops grown or growing this season upon the premises. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. P. USHER,

Secretary. WILLIAM P. DOLE, Esq.,

Commissioner of Indian Affairs.

Colville Reserve.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

OFFICE OF INDIAN AFFAIRS,

Washington, D. C., April 8, 1872. Sir: I have the honor to invite your attention to the necessity for the setting apart by executive order of a tract of country hereinafter described, as a reservation for the following bands of Indians in Washington Territory, not parties to any treaty, viz: The Methow Indians, numbering ...

316 The Okanagan Indians, numbering

340 The San Poel Indians, numbering.

538 The Lake Indians, numbering................

230 The Colville Indians, numbering.........................................

631 The Calispel Indians, numbering ...

420 The Spokane Indians, numbering ........................................

725 The Cour d'Alêne Iudians, numbering ..................................

700 And scattering bands..

300

Total

..... 4,200 * * * Excluding that portion of the tract of contry referred to found to be in the British possessions, the following are the natural boundaries of the proposed reservation, wbich I have the honor to recommend be set apart by the President for the Indians in question, and such others as the department may see fit to settle thereon, viz: Commencing at a point on the Columbia River where the Spokape River empties in the same; thence up the Columbia River to where it crosses the forty-ninth parallel north latitude; thence east, with said forty-ninth parallel, to where the Pend d'Oreille or Clark River crosses the same; thence up the Pend d'Oreille or Clark River to where it crosses the western boundary of Idaho Territory, the one hundred and seventeenth meridian west longitude; thence soutb, along said one hundred and seventeenth meridian, to where the Little Spokane River crosses the same; thence southwesterly, with said river, to its junction with the Big Spokane River; thence down the Big Spokane River to the place of beginning. The papers herein before referred to are respectfully submitted herewith, Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

F. A. WALKER,

Commissioner. The Hon. SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

OFFICE OF INDIAN AFFAIRS,

Washington, D. C., April 9, 1872. SIR: I have the honor to submit herewith a communication, dated the 8th instant, from the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, and accompanying papers, representing the necessity for the setting apart, by executive order, of a tract of country therein described for certain bards of Indians in Washington Territory not parties to any treaty.

The recommendation of the Commissioner in the premises is approved, and I respectfully request tbat the President direct that the tract of country designated upon the inclosed map be set apart for the Indians referred to, and such others as this department may see fit to settle thereon. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. R. COWEN,

Acting Secretary.

EXECUTIVE MANSION,

Washington, April 9, 1872 It is hereby ordered that the tract of country referred to in the within letter of the Acting Secretary of the Interior, and designated upon the accompanying map, be set apart for the bands of Indians in Washington Territory named in communication of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, dated the 8th instant, and for such other Indians as the Department of the Interior may see fit to locate thereon.

U. S. GRANT.

EXECUTIVE MANSION,

Washington, July 2, 1872. It is hereby ordered that the tract of country referred to in the within letter of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs as having been set apart for the Indians therein

pamed by executive order of April 9, 1872, be restored to the public domain, and that in lieu thereof the country bounded on the east and south by the Columbia River, on the west by the Okanagan River, and on the north by the British possessions, be, and the same is hereby, set apart as a reservation for said Indians, and for such other Indians as the Department of the Interior may see fit to locate thereon.

U. S. GRANT.

Makah Reserve.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, October 26, 1872. In addition to the reservation provided for by the second article of the treaty concluded January 31, 1€55, with the Makah Indians of Washington Territory, it is hereby ordered that there be withdrawn from sale and set apart for the use of the said Makah and other Indians, a tract of country in the said Territory of Washington, described and bounded as follows, viz: Commencing on the beach at the mouth of a small brook running into Neah Bay next to the site of the old Spanish fort; thence along the shore of said bay in a northeasterly direction to Boadah Point (being a point about four miles from the beginning); thence in a direct line south six miles; thence in a direct line west to the Pacific shore; thence northwardly along the shore of the Pacific to the mouth of a small stream running into the bay on the south side of Cape Flattery, a little above the Waatch Village; thence following said brook to its source; thence in a straight line to the place of beginning; the boundary-line from the mouth of the brook last mentioned to the place of beginning being identical with the southeastern boundary of the resorvation set apart for the Makah tribe of Indians by the treaty concluded with said Indians January 31, 1855, before referred to.

U. S.GRAN T.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, January 2, 1873. In lien of the addition made by executive order dated October 26, 1872, to the reservation provided for by the second article of the treaty concluded January 31, 1855, with the Makah Indiaus of Washington Territory, it is hereby ordered, that there be withdrawn from sale and set apart as such addition, for the use of the said Makah and other Indians, the tract of country in the said Territory of Washington bounded as follows, viz: Commencing on the beach at the mouth of a small brook running into Neah Bay next to the site of the old Spanish Fort; thence along the shore of said bay in a northeasterly direction four miles; thence in a direct line south six miles; thence in a direct line west to the Pacitic shore; thence northwardly along the shore of the Pacific to the mouth of a small stream running into the bay on the south side of Cape Flattery a little above the Waatch Village; thence following said brook to its source; thence in a straight line to the place of beginning; the boundary line from the mouth of the brook last mentioned to the place of beginning being identical with the southeastern bnondary of the reservation set apart for the Makah and other Indians by the treaty above referred to.

U. S. GRANT.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, October 21, 1873. In lieu of the addition made by executive order dated October 26, 1872, and amended by executive order of January 2, 1873, to the reservation provided for by the second article of the treaty concluded January 31, 1855, with the Makah tribe of Indians of Wasbington Territory (Statutes at Large, vol. 12, p. 939), which orders are hereby revoked, it is bereby ordered that there be withdrawn from sale and set apart as such addition for the use of the said Makah and other tribes of Indians, the tract of country in said Territory bounded as follows, viz: Commencing on the beach at the mouth of a small brook ropping into Neah Bay next to the site of the old Spanish fort; thence along the shore of said bay in a northeasterly direction, four miles; thence in a direct line south, six miles; thence in a direct live west to the Pacific shore; thence northwardly along the shore of tbe Pacific to the mouth of another sinall stream running into the bay on the south side of Cape Flattery, a little above the Waatch Village; thence following said brook to its source; thence in a straight line to the source of the first-mentioned brook, and thence following the same down to the place of begin

ning

U. S. GRANT.

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