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Description and valuation of Cherokee lands in Indian Territory, 8c.—Continued.

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Description and valuation of Cherokee lands in Indian Territory, fc.—Continued.

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East of 98° meridian.

220, 354. 22 212, 810.41 168, 901.08 96, 493 82 99, 312. 04 67, 520. 36 45, 934. 48 36, 783. 77 18, 229. 82

4, 507.65 220, 057. 62 219, 828. 53 220, 086. 66 220, 279.75 219, 197. 46 219, 304. 64 133, 011.02

86, 307. 49 218, 864. 06 218, 278. 81 214, 999.00 218. 479.54 217, 663. 82 217, 857. 36 217, 475. 45 217, 642.00 216, 889.93 217, 160. 56 217, 913. 41 216, 307. 38 217, 003. 38 218, 997. 63 220, 773. 84 220, 393.66 220, 820. 28 220, 150. 61 137, 982. 51

West of 980 meridian.

1 W. 2 W. 3 W . 4 W . 5 W. 6 W. 7 W. 7 W . 8 W . 9 W . 10 W. 11 W. 12 W. 13 W. 14 W. 15 W. 16 W 17 W. 18 W. 19 W. 20 W. 21 W. 22 W. 23 W. 24 W. 25 W. 26 W .

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REPORT OF LIEUT. R. H. PRATT, SPECIAL AGENT TO COLLECT INDIAN

YOUTH TO BE EDUCATED AT HAMPTON INSTITUTE, VA.

WASHINGTON, D. C., November 22, 1878. SIR: I have the honor to report that, in obedience to your orders of September 2 last, I proceeded to Dakota, and visited the several Indian agencies from Fort Berthold to Yancton Agency, on the Missouri River, making at each satisfactory arrangements that its proportion of Indian youth of both sexes would be ready on my return, a month later, to accompany me to Hampton, Va., for education in books and manual labor, as you had arranged. I found that the very small number of thirty-four, which you had allowed for the eight agencies named in the order, crippled the effort, and was a beggarly allowance compared with the needs and willingness of the Indians; and when I reached telegraph communication at Fort Sully, I telegraphed a request that I might be authorized to bring seventy-five. You thed fixed the limit at fifty.

I returned to Fort Berthold by rail, and, in company with my wife, began the work of gathering up. The Indians at Fort Berthold are more industrious and nearer to self-sup. port in their original state than any others within my knowledge. They are like all other Indians, however, in making the squaws do the greater part of the work. On my return they argued that they could not spare the girls because of their usefulness as laborers, and that education injured this quality. Through the cordial co-operation of the agent, E. H. Alden, the missionary, Rev. C. L. Hall, and his wife, and also of the two teachers, Miss Briggs and Miss Calhoun, I got nine boys and four girls, or rather three girls and one woman. This was inore than the proportion from this agency, but I esteemed it the most deserving. One of the girls was especially bright, and there was a general desire to save her from tbe degredations of ber Indian surroundings. The mother said that education and civilization would make her child look upon her as a savage, and that unless she could go with her child and learn too, the child could not come. I brought them both.

The boys from this agency are as follows: ARICKAREES.—1. Karnpach (Sioux boy) ..........

................... aged 16 years. 2. Tis-calf-ub (Laughing Face)...

aged 18 years. 3. Koo-nook-te-a-wan (Shooting Bear); Christian name, George Sharphone .......

aged 20 years. 4. A-bu-ka (White Wolf)...

aged 20 years. MANDANS.-5. Say-Edda (White Breast) ......

aged 18 years. 6. Ka-wbat (Bowlegs) .......

aged 12 years. 7. E-corrupt-ta-ba (Looking Around)...

aged 18 years. GROS VENTRES.-8. Ari-hotch-kish (Long Arm) son of Hard Horn, chief. aged 13 years. 9. No-wa-tesh (Tom Smith).....

aged 14 years. The girls are : ARICKAREES.-1. Mary (the mother)....

aged 26 years. . Anna (the daughter) ............................... aged 10 years, GROS VENTRES.-3. Josepbine Malnourie ............................. aged 18 years.

4. Sarah Walker ................................... aged 13 ye Except Mary, the girls are half-breeds. Tom Smith is a half-breed, and White Breast and Ka-what are one-fourth white.

This material is a fair average of the people, and each subject was recommended by the agent and his educational help.

At Standing Rock the Catholic Church controls the educational and religious work There were three separate agents in charge during the period of my visits. Father Stephan, the last agent, was quite anxious his agency should be represented. I brought from this agency

rs.

1. Nak-a-pala (Job Cadocte)........................................ aged 18 years. 2. U-bah-ke-umpa (Carries Flying)................................... aged 16 years. 3. Puh-ta-chella (Jobo Pleets)....................................... aged 18 years. 4. Wab-seecb-u-a (Rosa Pleets) ......

............. aged 15 years. All Sioux; the last two brother and sister and half-breeds.

From Cheyenne River Agency I accepted nine boys, exceptionally bright and of good standing. Upward of thirty bad applied to coine : 1. John Robb (son of White Bull) ...

................ aged 17 years. 2. Daniel Chautay Wabpeechay(son of Chief Little No Heart) ........ aged 14 years. 3. Henry T. Fisherman (son of Charley Fisherman, who was the first Indian at that agency to adopt citizen's dress) ..........

aged 17 years. 4. Harry Brown (son of Chief White Horse) ......................... aged 14 years.

.........................................

aged 14 years.

5. Louis Aygenonghwea.......

aged 15 years. 6. Leroy Shutaschday ............................................... aged 14 years. 7. Joseph Wahu ....... 8. Samuel Wahminayah Luzah..

..... aged 14 years. 9. Charley Tah-tabu-kah-skah.......

........ ................. .........

....... aged 12 years. The girls arranged from this agency were, at the last moment, led to abandon their intention through the prejudices against Hampton Institute, as a colored institution, existing in the minds of educators at the agency, which the officer who had undertaken the task of getting them ready found it impossible to overcome in the short time at bis disposal. I found this prejudice more or less at the several other agencies below, and with like effect as to girls.

From Crow Creek Agency I brought five boys and one girl, all good material, viz: 1. Hu-sau-sau (Grey Legs) Edward Ashley .......................... aged 18 years. 2. Mark-pia-monia (Walking Cloud) ................................ aged 19 years. 3. Pa-ma-ni (One who hoots while he walks)........................ aged 19 years. 4. Tu-kau-wi-cac-tra (Old Stone) Charles Stone..................... aged 14 years. 5. Xieuga (The Fox) Fox.........

........... aged 16 years. 6. Zie-wie (Yellow Hand) girl.....

........... aged 15 years. These were all recommended by the missionary in charge, Mrs. M. E. Duigan, who had a flourishing boarding-school in operation at the agency, and complained that her accommodations and facilities for pupils were not a tithe of what the Indians demanded ; that she was constantly turning away applicants. She gives special and effective attention to the Euglish language.

Six boys were selected and sent from the Lower Brulé Agency by Mr. Walker, the missionary in charge, himself a full-blood Sioux: 1. Ah-leh (Stepping On) Henry Rencountre..

......... aged 18 years. 2. Hay-ga-ek-tome (Elk Spider) Francis Rencountre.

................. aged 17 years. 3. Ho-tonck (Loud Voice) Joseph Winnebago.

unevago....................... aged 16 years. 4. Wo-ka-saka (Whips) James Wokasaka

........................ aged 17 years. 5. Otaga (Strong) George Bush Otter .....

... aged 15 years. 6. Ze-do, Lezeds Rencountre....... ............................ aged 16 years. These boys are all very highly spoken of by the miesionary.

At the Yankton Agency, the agent, Jobn W. Douglas, took a lively interest in the plan of manual labor education under civilized surroundings, and gave me eigbt boys and three girls, all good material, with more or less education in the Sioux dialect, and one boy with a sufficient knowledge of English to act as a medium of communication. They are all Yanctonnai Sioux.

BOYS. 1. George Dolina....

aged 15 years. 2. Edmund Bishop...

... aged 14 years. 3. Oscar Brown .......

.. aged 13 years. 4. David Simmons (half-breed).

aged 13 years. 5. Charley Willis .......

aged 18 years. 6. Tunkausapa (Joseph Cook) ..

aged 19 years. * 7. Samuel Four Star...

... aged 19 years. '8. Frank Yellow Bird ....

aged 18 years.

............................................

...................

GIRLS.

1. Mary Kettle..
2. Lizzie Spider ...........
3. Carrie Anderson ...............

aged 16 years.

aged 14 years. ............ aged 12 years.

TOTAL.

Fort Berthold......

9 boys 4 girls. Standing Rock..

3 boys 1 girl. Cheyenne River ...

9 boys Crow Creek .......

5 boys 1 girl. Lower Brulé ......

6 boys Yankton Agency ....

8 boys 3 girls.

40 boys 9 girls. The needs of educational effort among the wild tribes are very great. The education of small numbers is overborne and lost in the mass of corrupting and demoralizing surroundings. Children at school are hostages for good behavior of parents. Education in the English language is much desired by the Indians themselves, and the agents and other anthorities and instructors dealing with the Indians expressed satisfaction that an effort to that end was to be made under more favorable surroundings that can be brought to bear at the agencies.

I left Fort Berthold October 22. On the 24th and 25th encountered a severe snow

storm below Bismarck, and there was danger that the boat would be frozen in for the winter. It was the last boat to leave Bismarck for Yankton this fall. We reached Yankton October 31 and Hampton, Va., November 5. There was no event en route worth special mention. There was sadness at leaving home and friends, but the strange sights of civilization bridged their naturally buoyant natures over that depression, and they soon grew to take a lively interest in every new sight. I remained at Hampton until now, to settle them in their new life. The presence and purpose of the Florida boys has been an incentive, and the new youth have taken hold of their opportunity with a will. I have no doubt the department will realize its best expectations from this effort

I hand the department herewith a set of photographs taken soon after the youth reached Hampton. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. H. PRATT,

First Lieutenant, Tenth Cavalry. Hon. E. A. HAYT,

Commissioner of Indian Affairs, Washington, D. C.

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