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James M. Page......... July 15, 1874 P. A. Largey.......

118 Oct. 19, 1877 Benjamin F. Marsh .... Aug. 6. 1872 T. J. Harrington et al.

119 Oct. 25, 1877 Preston Scott .......... July 25, 1874 Charles S. Warren et al...

546

Oot. 26, 1877
Benjamin F. Marsh .... Aug. 6, 1872 Jos. D. Conrad et al. .....

Nov. 7, 1877
Do.........
Aug. 6, 1872 Cooney & Monaghan!...

Nov. 7, 1877
Demas L. McFarland .. June 22, 1874 Hope Mining Company..

549

Nov. 21, 1877
Do..
June 22, 1874 .do ...

550

Nov. 21, 1877
Albert B. Knight ...... July 19, 1875 Lavoisier C. Moreland ...

551

Dec. 3, 1877
Demas L. McFarland .. June 22, 1874 Andrew J. Davis ..

552

Dec. 3, 1877
Do.....
June 22, 1874 ...do ........

553

Dec. 3, 1877
June 22, 1874 ......do.....

Dec. 3, 1877
Do..
June 22, 1874 W. A. Clark ...

553

Dec. 4, 1877
Benjamin F. Marsh. Aug. 6, 1872 Davis C. Turner ....

556

Dec. 15, 1877
Do...
Aug. 6, 1872 Franklin Farrell et al

557

131 Dec. 15, 1877 James M. Page. July 15, 1874 P. A. Largey.....

558

132 Dec. 18, 1877 Do...... July 15, 1874 ......do ......

559

133 Dec. 21, 1877 Do... July 15, 1874

560

Dec. 21, 1877
Demas L. McFarland .. June 22, 1874 Marcus Daly et al .....

561

135

Dec. 24, 1877
Albert B. Knight .... July 19, 1875 Charles Leyendecker et al

562

137 Dec. 28, 1877 Benjamin F. Marsh .... Aug. 6, 1872 James McCabe et al ....

563

136 Dec. 27, 1877 James M. Page... July 15, 1874 Charles L. Dahler et al.

564

Jan. 2, 1878
Demas L. McFarland .. June 22, 1874 Andrew J. Davis ....

566

Jan. 7, 1878
Do....
June 22, 1874 ...do....

567

140 Jan. 7, 1878 Walter W. De Lacy. Apr. 25, 1873 G.A. Kellogg et al.

568

141 Jan. 8, 1878 Do... Apr. 25, 1873. ...do....

569

Jan. 8, 1878
Do.
Apr. 25, 1873 ...do....

570

Jan. 8, 1878
Do
Apr. 25, 1873 ...do .....

571 i 144 Jan. 8, 1878
Do.
Apr. 25, 1873 ...do.....

572 1145 Jan. 8, 1878
Demas L. McFarland June 22, 1874 R. W. Donnell et al.

Jan. 14, 1878
Do....
June 22, 1874 H.C. Weibbold ...

Jan. 25, 1878
Do...
June 22, 1874 Richard S. Jones et al.

148 Jan. 31, 1878
Do.
June 22, 1874 James A. Talbott et al

149 Jan. 31, 1878

130
Do
June 22, 1874 ...... do ..........

Jan. 31, 1878
Do..

June
...do .....

578

151 Jan. 31, 1878 Do. June 22, 1874 John Noyes et al...

579

Jan. 31, 1878
June 22, 1874
Do..
Dennis Leary .....

580

Jan. 31, 1878
Do
June 22, 1874 National Mining and Exploring Company

Jan. 31, 1878
Do
June 22, 1874 George W. Rea et al ....

582

155 Feb. 2, 1878 Do June 22, 1874 ......do..............

583

Feb. 2, 1878
James M. Page
July 15, 1874 John D. Thomas et al

491

157 Feb. 14, 1878 Demas L. McFarland. June 22, 1874 William Wilson et al ...

584

Feb. 16, 1878
George F. Marsh
Oct. 25, 1877 Charles Pryse .......

159 Feb. 19, 1878
Demas L. McFarland .. June 874 Joel W. Ransom et al

586

160 Feb. 20, 1878
Do
June 22, 1874 William A. Clark et al ..

161 Feb. 21, 1878
Do
June 22, 1874 Jos. K. Clark ....

588

162 Feb. 21, 1878 Do

June 22, 1874 ... do...

589

163 Feb. 21, 1878 June 22, 1874 ......do....

590

164
Do ......

Feb. 21, 1878
Benjamin F. Marsh.... Aug. 6, 1872 Alex. T. Williams ..

591 0 165 Feb. 21, 1878 Demas L. McFarland .. June 22, 1874 W. E. Smith et al ...

592 25 166 Feb. 23, 1878 June 22, 1874 Do John Downs et al...

1 25 167 Feb. 23, 1878 * Deposited in First National Bank of Helena, Mont.

47 2 south ...... 6 west. 41 13 north .... 9 west.

43 3 north ...... 8 west.
13 and 17 10 and 11 north 1 west.

46 11 north ... 1 west.
56' 7 north ...... 13 west.
57 / 7 north .. 13 west.
392 south .. 3 west.
44 3 north .. 8 west.
38 3 north

8 west.
39 3 north

8 west.
603 north

8 west.
7 north .... 4 west.

7 north ...... 4 west.
416 north

4 west.
6 north ... 4 west.
36 7 north

4 west.
61 3 north

8 West.
37 9 south

3 west.
5l 10 north

2 east.
48 2 south

6 west.
62 3 north ...... 8 west.
63 3 north

8 west.
3910 north

9 east.
40 10 north

9 east.
41 | 10 north ...... 9 east.
42 10 north

9 east.
43 10 north .. 9 east.
643 north

8 west.
65 3 north

8 west.
3 north ... 8 west.
67 3 north.

8 west.
68 3 north

8 west.
693 north

8 west.
3 north.... 8 west.
46 and 71 ' 3 north.... 7 and 8 west.

72 3 north..... 8 west.
and 40 1 and 2 north 7 west.

38' 2 north....... 7 west.

43 2 south ...... 6 west.
and 73 3 and 4 north 8 west.

13 north..... 8 West.
3 north.... 7 west.
3 north...... 8 west.

3 north....... 8 west.
76 3 north... 8 west.

77 3 north..... 8 west.
43 A and B 7 north... 4 west.

78 3 north...... 8 west.
793 north....... 8 west.

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B.-Statement of special deposits for office work on mining claims in Montana for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1878–Continued.

Name of depnty.

| Date of appointment.

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Demas L. McFarland .. June 22, 1874 John Downs et al...
Do....

.... June 22, 1874 A. W. Barnard et al ....
Do....

... June 22, 1874 William A. Clark et al...
Albert B. Knight... ... July 19, 1875 Alex. McKay et al....
Demas L. McFarland .. June 22, 1874 Samuel B. Thompson.
Do....

June 22, 1874 J. F. Potting ......
Do......

June 22, 1874 A. W. Barnard et al .
Albert B. Kni

July 19, 1875 Joel W. Ransom et al.
Do.......

July 19, 1875 .....do...........
Do ......

July 19, 1875 Joel W. Ransom....
George F. Marsh.. ... Oct. 25, 1877 Thomas Cruse.....
Albert B. Knight ...... July 19. 1875 Rolla Butcher et al.
Thomas T. Baker ...... Dec. 15, 1877 Hugh B. McCleery et
Benjamin F. Marsh.... Aug. 6, 1872 John Caplice et al ...
Albert B. Knight ...... July 19, 1875 Granville Stuart ...
George B. Foote....... Dec. 19, 1872 J. E. Totten et al.......
Albert B. Knight ...... July 19. 1875 A. J. Rundell ........
James M. Page .... July 15, 1874 Charles L. Dahler ..
Do....

5. 1874 Patrick A. Largey....
Albert B. I
+ B. Knight ..

July 19, 1875 David N. Upton et al.
Do...

.... July 19, 1875 Andrew J. Davis.....
Do....

... July 19, 1875 ......do.......
Do....

July 19, 1875 Marcus Daly et al ..
George F. Marsh ....... Oct. 25, 1877 N. S. Vestel.....

Oct. 23, 1877 N. S. Vestel et al....
Albert B. Knight ...... July 19, 1875 National Mining and
George B. Foote....... Dec. 19, 1872 George W. Reed et al.....
Thomas T. Baker...... Dec. 15, 1877 Rolla Butcher ....
Albert B. Knight ...... July 19, 1875 William A. Clark et al.

July 19, 1875 .. ....do ...
Do..............
James M. Page ........

July 13, 1874 Patrick A. Largey .........
George B. Foote ....... Dec. 19, 1872 F. V. Schener...
Albert B. Knight ...... July 19, 1875 Patrick A. Largey.

July 19, 1875 Jos. K. Clark et al.

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Benjamin F. Marsh .... Aug. 6, 1872 | William Bell True et al.....

Aug. 6,1872......do...........

Aug. 6, 1872 William Bell True and Nathan S. Vestel .
Do..

Aug. 6, 1872 1 . do .......

Aug. 6, 1872 Nathan S. Vestel ..........
Do....

Aug. 6, 1872 William Mayger et al ....
James M. Page

July 15, 1874 Lewis Fullhart et al ...... .........................
Albert B. Kn

July 19, 1875 | Monroe Silver Mining Company......
Do..
July 19, 1875 ...... do........

Total amount deposited..

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3, 150

* Deposited in First National Bank of Helena, Montana.

ROSWELL H. MASON,
United States Surveyor General for Montana.

deputy surveyor for the thorongh and faithful performance of his duties, and contrast very unfavorably with those paid by other governments. I could cite several instances to prove this statement, but confine myself to referring to the Province of Ontario, Dominion of Canada, as the one nearest at hand. There, under the contract system, the price paid to deputy surveyors for field work is seven cents per acre. In this surveying district, as previously stated in this report, the amount paid is about two and eight-tenths cents per acre.

INSPECTION OF SURVEYS, During the past spring and early summer, in accordance with the requirements of section 2223, United States Revised Statutes, I personally inspected a large portion of the work in the field, then under contract, satisfying myself that the same had been faithfully executed in accordance with the law and instructions. In this connection I desire to state that, in my judgment, the provision of law above referred to requiring the surveyor general, “ so far as is compatible with the desk duties of his oftice," to “occasionally inspect the surveying operations in the field," is a very wise one. Such inspections by the surveyor-general are a direct check upon any possible carelessness or neglect of duty upon the part of the deputy surveyor; his willingness, thus shown to all the employés in his district, to personally endure the discomforts and often hardships of field work, tends to increase the efficiency of the service, and it gives him an opportunity to acquire a personal knowledge of the wants of his surveying district, which could not be obtained in any other way. Deputy Surveyor De Lacy, in the letter above referred to, says, relative to inspections:

“The surveys should be thoroughly inspected. The inspector should come to the ground either when the surveyor is there or directly after, should test a certain number of lines, look at the corners, examine triangulations, and see whether the notes agree with the lines. A certain percentage of errors found should be sufficient to exclude the surveyor froin future contracts. The inineral surveys should also be inspected; that is, a certain number should be examined in each district of those which are surveyed during the year. If the examiner did his duty there would very soon be a marked improvement in government surveys."

MINERAL SURVEYS. During the past fiscal year 118 surveys of lode and placer claims have been returned to this office, worked up and approved. The amount of deposits made for office work on mining claims was $3,150, and amount paid to clerks from that fund was $2,187.90, showing a surplus of $962. 10.

During the previous fiscal year, ending June 30, 1877, 71 survey of lode and placer claims were returned to this oftice, worked up and approved. The amount of deposits made for office work on mining claims was $1,810, and amount paid to clerks from that fund was $4,075, showing a deficit of $2,265.

This comparison is respectfully submitted for the purpose of showing that no part of the deficiency of $853.93 now existing in special deposit fund, as per Exhibit J, was incurred since I assumed charge of this surveying district, and also that, during the fiscal year, 118 surveys have been workerl up and approvedl, at a cost of $2,187.90, as against 77 surveys worked up and approved, at a cost of $4,075, during the previous fiscal year ending June 30, 1-77.

OFFICE WORK. A detailed statement of the work performeal in this office during the fiscal year is given in Exhibit P. In addition to the regular work therein enumerated, much time and labor have been spent in arranging the records of this office, which were, and are still to some extent, in an inconvenient and incomplete state. The work has been promptly, carefully, and thoroughly executed.

STATEMENTS.
The following statements are transmitted as a part of this report, viz:

A. Showing condition of appropriation for surveys of public land in the Territory of Montana during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1878.

B. Showing amount of special deposits for office work on mining claims in Montana for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1878.

C. Showing description of public land surveyed in Montana Territory during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1878.

D. Showing condition of the public surveys contracted for by the surveyor general for Montana Territory, under appropriation by Congress for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1878.

E. Showing condition of appointments made for the survey of mineral claims in Montana, under acts of Congress during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1878.

F. Showing the description of land for which township plats and descriptive lists have been furnished the Helena and Bozeman land offices during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1878.

G. Showing the condition of the appropriation for the salary of the surveyor general for Montana during the fiscal year eniling June 30, 1878.

H. Showing the condition of the appropriation for the clerks in the office of the surveyor general for Montana, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1878.

Í. Showing the condition of the appropriation for incidental expenses for the office of the surveyor general for Montana, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1878.

J. Showing the condition of the account of special deposits for office work on mining claims in the office of the surveyor general for Montana during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1878.

K. Showing the number of plats made in the office of the surveyor general for Montana, during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1878.

L. Showing the number of acres of public land surveyedl in Montana Territory from the inception of surveys to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1878.

M. Showing the number of linear miles ru, the rate per mile, and the total cost of surveys, in the Territory of Montana, during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1878.

N. Giving names, nativity, &c., of the surveyor general and the employés in his office at Helena, Montana, during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1878.

0. Showing the number of letters recorded in the office of the surveyor general for Montana, during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1878.

P. Showing the work performed in the office of the surveyor general for Montana, during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1878.

Q. Estimates for surveying services and office expenses in the district of Montana, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1880.

ESTIMATES. My estimate for field work is based upon what I regard the actual necessities of this district, and the prices named are those established by law, with the exception of meander lines, which I have estimated at $10 per mile, same as standard. The work of running, measuring, and marking meander lines, and the office work of the deputysurveyor on same, is far more difficult than standard lines. As it will be necessary to do a large amount of meandering in this clistrict, in the near future, I trust that Congress, in justice to the deputy surveyors, will increase the rate from $6 per mile to that named above.

My estimate for my own salary is based upon that paid my predecessors up to July 1, 1877. and in view of the work and responsibility required, and the cost of living in this Territory, it is, in my judgment, as small an amount as should be paid for the services rendered. The same remark will apply to the salaries of the clerks.

The estimate for incidental expenses is the same as allowed during the present fiscal year, and it is only by the exercise of strict economy that it will cover the actual necessary expenses of the office.

The estimate for binding and preserving the original records of surveys has been so often made and indorsed by the Commissioner and, as often, stricken out of the appropriation, that it seems almost useless to ask for it again, yet I deem it my duty to once more call attention to its necessity.

AGRICULTURE. The land under cultivation in this Territory comprises only a very small portion of that capable of being so used, and this important branch of industry can scarcely be said to have kept pace with the wants of the people. This is not a strange state of affairs in so new a country, originally supposed to be valuable only for its minerals. Within the past year or two there has been a marked increase in the amount of agricultural products, and this will doubtless continue until the supply equals the demand.

The climate of Montana has undergone a marked change during the past four years, the rain-fall increasing from year to year, and many lands supposed to be utterly worthless for agricultural purposes are now bearing fine crops of hay, grain, vegetables, &c.

PLACER MINES. Although the days for making large fortunes in placer mining have probably gone by, it is still an important source of wealth and, owing to the increased rain-fall, more ground is now being worked than for several years previous.

There is a vast amount of placer-mining ground in this Territory which would pay from $1.50 to $2 per man per diem, and, with an increase of population and reduction in the cost of living, this will undoubtedly all be worked.

New and rich mines are said to have been discovered in the Bear Paw Mountains, but, as yet, sufficient work has not been done to prove their permanence or value.

GOLD LODES. There has also been a marked increase in the amount of gold ore worked in the Territory. The exceedingly rich body of ore struck in the Penobscot mine, situated in township 11 north, range 6 west, has caused great excitement, not only in Montana,

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