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governor estimates the farming and grazing lands of the Territory as about equal in area to the State of New York. Heat is a dominant feature of the climate. In the dry valley of the Colorado the summer heat is intense and of long duration. It is a noticeable fact that the heat of the sun does not produce the fatal effects of extreme heat in the moist climate of the Atlantic coast.

The chief industry of Arizona 'is the development of its mineral wealth, gold, silver, and copper being found in large quantities. The difficulties of transportation deter the growth of population and the investment of outside capital. Reference is also made to the insecurity of titles as one of the causes operating against immigration and the influx of money. The public schools of the Territory are reported to be in a good condition, and the progress made in education satisfactory. The governor discusses the Indian question, the condition of the tribes within the Territory, their wants, &c., and makes certain suggestions as to their future treatment. The concluding portions of the report are devoted to the presentation of facts relating to projected railroad routes and suggestions thereon, together with a suggestion that competent persons be employed to examine the structure of the country” and make experiments from time to time with the view of indicating to the people the situations and depths at which water, whether by artesian wells or other means, may be found.

As reports had not been received from the governors of Dakota, Wyoming, and New Mexico at the time of preparing this report, no reference has been made to their present condition and resources. Should they be received in time they will be printed, so that the series of reports from the several Territories may be complete.

RESTORATION OF INTERIOR DEPARTMENT BUILDING.

At its last session Congress appropriated $600 to enable the Secretary of the Interior to secure competitive plans for the repairing and reconstruction of the Interior Department building. It also authorized the appointment of a commission of three practical men skilled in the art of building to make report and submit specifications upon the plans secured, and appropriated for the work of restoration the sum of $100,000.

On the 14th of June, 1878, a circular was sent to many of the leading architects of the country, and to all who expressed a desire to compete, calling for plans for the restoration and reconstruction of the building.

Among the requirements were:

1. A design for the restoration of the building substantially as it stood before the fire.

2. A design for the conversion of the former model-rooms in the north and west wings into office-rooms, and the addition of a model-room above the offices and around the whole building, or over the north and west wings, without, however, changing the present architectural appearance from the street; also design for an additional story.

3. Designs for an entire new roof for the whole building; also, eleva

tors for the north and south wings; also, for a structure connecting the north and south wings through center of court-yard.

Six hundred dollars were offered for the design deemed best and recommended by the skilled architects acting as a commission for the examination of the plans submitted.

The commission consisted of James K. Wilson, of Cincinnati, Ohio, Richard M. Upjohn, of New York, and H. W. Hartwell, of Boston, Mass.

These gentlemen entered upon their duties on the 22d of July, and after a careful examination and earnest consideration of the various plans before them submitted a unanimous report on the 9th of August, recommending the design which had been submitted by J. A. Vrydagh, of Terre Haute, Ind. All the plans were examined by the commission without knowledge on their part of the names of the competing architects. The award was thereupon made to Mr. Vrydagh, and $600 paid to him in accordance with the terms of the circular and the act authorizing the payment. He was invited to visit Washington for the purpose of conferring with the department in relation to the work, and was subsequently authorized to complete the detailed drawings and submit estimates of the work in detail; also, the total cost of the reconstruction.

This labor was performed, and the detailed drawings, together with the estimates, were received at the department on the 14th of the present month. The total cost of the reconstruction upon the plan recommended by the commission is estimated at $973,931.90. The reconstruction of the building upon this plan would secure an addition of at least seventy commodious rooms and other conveniences not now possessed, and would make the entire structure practically fire-proof.

In view of the short time intervening between the completion of the detailed drawings and the meeting of Congress, and the further fact that no obligations can be incurred beyond the amount of money appro. priated, I have deemed it proper to delay further action until the plans and estimates shall have been submitted to Congress, and such additional legislation had as will provide for the prompt prosecution of the work. While I recognize the absolute necessity of providing more room for the growing wants of the department, I have not felt authorized to begin a work the completion of which would so materially change the style and architectural proportions of the building as it now stands.

The plans, estimates, and all facts necessary to a thorough understanding of the work will be transmitted to Congress at an early day, with the recommendation that, in the event of the design being approved or other direction given, a sufficient appropriation be made to cover the estimated cost of the improvement, so that the reconstruction of the building be no longer delayed. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

I C. SCHURZ,

Secretary of the Interior. The PRESIDENT.

REPORT

OF THE

COMMISSIONER OF THE GENERAL LAND OFFICE.

LETTER OF THE COMMISSIONER OF THE GENERAL LAND OFFICE TRANS

MITTING HIS ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1878.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,
GENERAL LAND OFFICE,

October 28, 1878. SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith the annual report of this office showing the business transacted during the fiscal year ending with the 30th June, 1878. This report shows,

First. The extent of surveys, exhibiting the area surveyed during the fiscal year as 8,041,011.83 acres, the whole area surveyed since the begin. ning of public surveys as 724,311,477 acres, and the area of the States and Territories containing public lands which remains unsurveyed as 1,090,161,171 acres.

Second. It shows the extent of the disposals of public lands during the fiscal year. Under this head it appears that the whole number of acres disposed of during the year is 8,686,178.88 acres, showing an increase of 3,836,411.18 acres over the area disposed of during the previous fiscal year. The total of disposals for the year is made up of the following items, viz:

Acres. Cash entries ..................

877, 555. 14 Being an increase over the previous fiscal year of 136,868.57 acres. Homestead entries........

:.......... 4,418, 344. 92 Being an increase over the previous fiscal year of 2,240,336.75 acres. Timber culture entries................................................ 1,870, 4

Being an increase over the previous fiscal year of 1,349,760.79 acres. Desert land entries under act of March 3, 1877, this being the first entire Year of its operation....................

............ 310,5.53. 05 Agricultural-college sirip locations ....................................

610.00 Being a decrease of 640 acres as compared with the previous fiscal year. Locations with military bounty land warrants, under acts of 1847, 1850, 1632 and 1855 ......

84, 720.00 Being a decrease of 12,480 acres as compared with the previous fiscal year.

State selections approved : For sehool indemnity ...

50, 142, 59 For internal improvements.

17, 420, 39 For agricnltural colleges..

24, 097. 10 For universities .....

44, 844. 13 For salt springs ........

24, 114.56 For public buildings ...

29, 146, 33 For penitentiary ......

.. 25, 226.83

214,992. 53 Being an increase over the previous fiscal year of 59,354.80 acres.

18

tors for the north and south wings; also, for a structure connecting the north and south wings through center of court-yard.

Six hundred dollars were offered for the design deemed best and recommended by the skilled architects acting as a commission for the examination of the plans submitted.

The commission consisted of James K. Wilson, of Cincinnati, Ohio, Richard M. Upjohn, of New York, and H. W. Hartwell, of Boston, Mass.

These gentlemen entered upon their duties on the 22d of July, and after a careful examination and earnest consideration of the various plans before them submitted a unanimous report on the 9th of August, recommending the design which had been submitted by J. A. Vrydagh, of Terre Haute, Ind. All the plans were examined by the commission without knowledge on their part of the names of the competing architects. The award was thereupon made to Mr. Vrydagh, and $600 paid to him in accordance with the terms of the circular and the act authorizing the payment. He was invited to visit Washington for the purpose of conferring with the department in relation to the work, and was subsequently authorized to complete the detailed drawings and submit estimates of the work in detail; also, the total cost of the reconstruction.

This labor was performed, and the detailed drawings, together with the estimates, were received at the department on the 14th of the present month. The total cost of the reconstruction upon the plan recommended by the commission is estimated at $973,931.90. The reconstruction of the building upon this plan would secure an addition of at least seventy commodious rooms and other conveniences not now possessed, and would make the entire structure practically fire-proof.

In view of the short time intervening between the completion of the detailed drawings and the meeting of Congress, and the further fact that no obligations can be incurred beyond the amount of money appropriated, I have deemed it proper to delay further action until the plans and estimates shall have been submitted to Congress, and such additional legislation had as will provide for the prompt prosecution of the work. While I recognize the absolute necessity of providing more room for the growing wants of the department, I have not felt authorized to begin a work the completion of which would so materially change the style and architectural proportions of the building as it now stands.

The plans, estimates, and all facts necessary to a thorough understanding of the work will be transmitted to Congress at an early day, with the recommendation that, in the event of the design being approved or other direction given, a sufficient appropriation be made to cover the estimated cost of the improvement, so that the reconstruction of the building be no longer delayed. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

1 C. SCHURZ,

Secretary of the Interior. The PRESIDENT.

REPORT

OF THE

COMMISSIONER OF THE GENERAL LAND OFFICE.

LETTER OF THE COMMISSIONER OF THE GENERAL LAND OFFICE TRANS

MITTING HIS ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1878.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,
GENERAL LAND OFFICE,

October 28, 1878. SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith the annual report of this office showing the business transacted during the fiscal year ending with the 30th June, 1878. This report shows

First. The extent of surveys, exhibiting the area surveyed during the fiscal year as 8,041,011.83 acres, the whole area surveyed since the begin. ning of public surveys as 724,311,477 acres, and the area of the States and Territories containing public lands which remains unsurveyed as 1,090,461,171 acres.

Second. It shows the extent of the disposals of public lands during the fiscal year. Under this head it appears that the whole number of acres disposed of during the year is 8,686,178.88 acres, showing an increase of 3,836,411.18 acres over the area disposed of during the previous fiscal year. The total of disposals for the year is made up of the following items, viz:

Acres. Cash entries.......

877, 555. 14 Being an increase over the previous fiscal year of 136,868.57 acres. Homestead entries.....

..... 4,418, 344. 92 Being an increase over the previous fiscal year of 2,240,336.75 acres. Timber culture entries.....

1,870, 434.18 Being an increase over the previous fiscal year of 1,349,760.79 acres. Desert land entries under act of March 3, 1877, this being the first entire year of its operation.......

310, 553, 05 Agricultural-college scrip locations........

640.00 Being a decrease of 640 acres as compared with the previous fiscal year. Locations with military bounty land warrants, under acts of 1847, 1850, 1852 and 1855 .......

84, 720.00 Being a decrease of 12,480 acres as compared with the previous fiscal year.

State selections approved : For school indemnity ......

50, 142. 59 For internal improveinents..

17, 420.39 For agricultural colleges..

24, 097.40 For universities ........

44, 844. 43 For salt springs ...

24, 114, 56 For public buildings .......

.. 29, 146, 33 For penitentiary ........

25, 226.83

214, 992.53 Being an increase over the previous fiscal year of 59,354.80 acres.

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