Thinking about Biology

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Apr 3, 2003 - Science - 235 pages
Thinking about Biology is intended for biology students who are interested in reflecting on the wider contexts of their studies. This 2003 book encourages students to see that biology does not deliver certainties; it discusses how biological ideas become established facts; it uses history to examine how ideas change, and to show that the biological facts that form the basis of a biology course are likely to change too. Each chapter is based on biological topics, and examines them for their philosophical, social and political implications. Topics covered include the role of natural selection in evolution, the history of ideas about fertilisation and inheritance, vivisection, and reductionism. Genetically modified foods, xenotransplantation, eugenics, and genetic testing are some of the controversial subjects discussed. Thinking About Biology should be essential reading for all college students already taking a biology course, and for those contemplating such a course in the future.
 

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Contents

III
7
IV
9
V
19
VI
24
VII
31
VIII
42
IX
44
X
50
XXX
121
XXXI
137
XXXII
140
XXXIII
150
XXXIV
156
XXXV
163
XXXVII
166
XXXVIII
170

XI
52
XII
54
XIII
58
XIV
61
XV
64
XVI
67
XVII
69
XVIII
73
XIX
77
XX
81
XXI
85
XXII
89
XXIII
91
XXIV
95
XXV
106
XXVI
107
XXVII
109
XXVIII
114
XXIX
116
XXXIX
172
XL
175
XLI
178
XLII
180
XLIII
182
XLIV
187
XLV
191
XLVI
193
XLVII
196
XLVIII
198
XLIX
202
L
206
LI
210
LIII
212
LIV
216
LV
218
LVI
224
LVII
229
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About the author (2003)

Stephen Webster is a member of the Science Communication Group in Imperial College, London.

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