History of the British turf, Volume 1

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Page 2 - Hast thou given the horse strength ? Hast thou clothed his neck with thunder ? Canst 'thou make him afraid as a grasshopper? The glory of his nostrils is terrible. He paweth in the valley, and rejoiceth in his strength : He goeth on to meet the armed men.
Page 142 - Horses to the usual place for weighing the riders, and he that dismounts before or wants weight is distanced ; unless he be disabled by an accident which should render him incapable of riding back, in which case he may be led or carried to the scale. 16. Horses' plates or shoes not allowed in the weight.
Page 3 - The glory of his nostrils is terrible. He paweth in the valley, and rejoiceth in his strength: He goeth on to meet the armed men. He mocketh at fear, and is not affrighted ; Neither turneth he back from the sword. The quiver rattleth against him, The glittering spear and the shield.
Page 169 - ... and if he shall start his horse without so doing, the prize shall be withheld for a period to be fixed upon by the Stewards, at the expiration of which^ time, if the qualification be not proved to the satisfaction of the Stewards, he shall not be entitled to the prize, though his horse shall have come in first ; but it shall be given to the owner of the second horse. When the qualification of a horse is objected to after that time, the person making the objection must prove the disqualification.
Page ix - I know not, in the whole range of language, terms sufficiently expressive to describe this infernal road. Let me most seriously caution all travellers who may accidentally propose to travel this terrible country, to avoid it as they would the devil, for a thousand to one they break their necks or their limbs by overthrows or breakings down.
Page 153 - No person who has once subscribed to a stake shall be allowed to withdraw his name, and no nomination shall be altered in any respect after the time of closing, without the consent of all the parties in the race.
Page 327 - Plate Course. — The horses start at the Charlton Down to the north-west of the Stand, run over to the east of the Clump, go the outside circle of the hill, and return to the east of the Clump, about three miles and five furlongs.
Page 58 - I am going to yield thee up ? To Europeans, who will tie thee close, — who will beat thee, — who will render thee miserable. Return with me, my beauty, my jewel, and rejoice the hearts, of my children.
Page 155 - When any person has more than one nomination in a stake, he shall not be allowed to start any horse for it unless the forfeits be paid for every horse which does not start, belonging to him, or standing in his name, or in the same name as the horse which runs, as well as the stakes for those which do.
Page 162 - If for any plate, sweepstakes, or subscription, the first two horses shall come in so near together that the Judge shall not be able to decide which won, those...

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