Spenser: Book I of the Faery Queene

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Clarendon Press, 1881 - 257 pages

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Page 51 - THE noble hart, that harbours vertuous thought, And is with child of glorious great intent, Can never rest, untill it forth have brought Th' eternall brood of glorie excellent.
Page 111 - For he that once hath missed the right way, The further he doth goe, the further he doth stray. ' Then doe no further goe, no further stray, But here ly downe, and to thy rest betake, Th...
Page 6 - Enforst to seeke some covert nigh at hand, A shadie grove not farr away they spide, That promist ayde the tempest to withstand ; Whose loftie trees, yclad with sommers pride, Did spred so broad, that heavens light did hide...
Page xxx - Queene to assygne her some one of her knights to take on him that exployt. Presently that clownish person, upstarting, desired that adventure : whereat the Queene much wondering, and the Lady much gainesaying, yet he earnestly importuned his desire.
Page xxviii - I have followed all the antique Poets historicall; first Homere, who in the Persons of Agamemnon and Ulysses hath ensampled a good governour and a vertuous man, the one in his Ilias, the other in his Odysseis: then Virgil, whose like intention was to doe in the person of Aeneas: after him Ariosto comprised them both in his Orlando : and lately Tasso dissevered them againe, and formed both parts in two persons, namely that part which they in Philosophy call Ethice, or vertues of a private man, coloured...
Page 168 - Abhorred Styx, the flood of deadly hate; Sad Acheron, of sorrow, black and deep; Cocytus, named of lamentation loud Heard on the rueful stream; fierce Phlegethon, Whose waves of torrent fire inflame with rage.
Page xxviii - I know, this methode will seeme displeasaunt, which had rather have good discipline delivered plainly in way of precepts, or sermoned at large, as they use, then thus clowdily enwrapped in allegoricall devises. But such, me seeme, should be satisfide with the use of these dayes, seeing all things accounted by their showes, and nothing esteemed of, that is not delightfull and pleasing to commune sence.
Page xxx - ... seemed the goodliest man in al that company, and was well liked of the lady.
Page 118 - She was araied all in lilly white, And in her right hand bore a cup of gold, With wine and water fild up to the hight, In which a serpent did himselfe enfold, That horrour made to all that did behold ; But she no...
Page xxvii - The generall end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline...

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