Red is Not the Only Color: Contemporary Chinese Fiction on Love and Sex Between Women, Collected Stories

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Patricia Angela Sieber
Rowman & Littlefield, 2001 - Fiction - 201 pages
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The first English-language anthology of its kind, Red Is Not the Only Color offers a window into the uncharted terrain of intimate relations between Chinese women. As urban China has undergone rapid transformation, same-sex relations have emerged as a significant, if previously neglected, touchstone for the exploration of the meaning of social change. The short fiction in this volume highlights tensions between tradition and modernization, family and state, art and commerce, love and sex. These stories introduce an emerging generation of acclaimed, and at times controversial, women writers, including Chen Ran, Bikwan Wong, and Chen Xue. By presenting fiction from the PRC, Hong Kong, and Taiwan, the collection deliberately maps the literary contours of same-sex intimacy in broadly cultural rather than purely political terms. The perceptive and informative introduction surveys the social evolution of female same-sex intimacy in twentieth-century China, examines how each author engages with her Chinese context, and discusses how the stories compare with earlier representations of Chinese same-sex intimacy in the United States. Compelling for its literary quality, the anthology will also spur reflection among scholars of modern Chinese literature as well as readers interested in questions of gender, sexuality, and cross-cultural representation.
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
SHES A YOUNG WOMAN AND SO AM I
37
BREAKING OPEN
49
A RECORD
73
BROTHERS
93
LIPS
143
FEVER
149
IN SEARCH OF THE LOST WINGS OF THE ANGELS
153
ANDANTE
169
Critical Biographies
183
Glossary
197
ABOUT THE EDITOR
201
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Page 214 - N's book as a required textbook for two courses in the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures at The Ohio State University.

About the author (2001)

Patricia Sieber is assistant professor in the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures at The Ohio State University.

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