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National Parks Table 9.—Statement showing work accomplished at Civilian Conservation Corps camps under the jurisdiction of the National Park Service, July 1,1934, to June SO, 1935

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National Parks Table 9.—Statement shouting work accomplished at Civilian Conservation Corps camps under the jurisdiction of the National Park Service, July 1, 1934, to June SO, 19S5—Continued

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National Pabks Table 9.—Statement showing work accomplished at Civilian Conservation Corps camps under the jurisdiction of the National Park Service, July 1, 1984, to June 30, 1935—Continued

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GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

(wai/tee C. Mendenhall, Director)

During the fiscal year 1934-35, although directly appropriated funds for the support of the Survey's regular activities have been at a low ebb (see details in later pages), these have been augmented by substantial allocations for closely related work made by the Public Works Administration.

As a consequence the year has been a busy and productive one. More than 46,000 square miles of mapping has been done, including a beginning in Puerto Rico; 1,900 linear miles of streams with potential power values have been surveyed; about 700,000 individual maps have been distributed, many of them to cooperating States and new Government agencies; approximately $40,000 has been received directly from sales of Survey publications; studies of a number of the long-neglected mineral deposits of the Eastern and Southern States have been made; it has been possible to repair and put in good condition approximately 500 of the nearly 3,000 river-measurement stations distributed over the United States; special drought studies have been carried out; Alaskan mapping and mineral-resources investigations have continued at a nearly normal rate; many abandoned wells and mines on public and Indian lands that were actual or potential menaces to safety or to mineral or water supplies were repaired; substantial progress was made in the preparation of numerous unit plans of development of oil and gas fields under the mineral leasing acts—a valuable conservation measure; and supervision, although inadequate, was maintained over nearly 15,000 oil and gas and other mineral properties on public and Indian lands and naval reserves.

Effective cooperative relations have been maintained with a large number of States in geologic work, study of water supplies, and topographic mapping. Similar relations have existed with a number of the older and newer agencies of Government, the special capacities of the technical staffs of the Survey being thus made available in numerous governmental activities, including those of the Petroleum Administrative Board, the National Resources Board, the Bureau of Public Roads, the Tennessee Valley Authority, the Office of Indian Affairs, and many others.

There is an insistent Nation-wide and thoroughly logical demand for greatly increased activity in topographic mapping because of the

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