Report

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

on some of the Echinoderms of the Expedition
128
Mr Frederic T Mott on the Scientific Value of Physical Beauty 134
134
Mr T B Griersons Remarks on Variation of Colouring in Animals 140
140
Mr W BoytDawxin8 and George Busk on the Discovery of Platycnemic
148
Professor P Maktin Duncan on the Geological Changes which have Occurred
149
Mr J S Phene on a recent Examination of British Tumuli and Monuments
155
Mr Alexander Buchan on the Great Movements of the Atmosphere 167
167
Lord Milton on Railway Routes across North America and the Physical
172
Colonel H Yules Notes on Analogies of Manners between the IndoChinese
178
Mr R Dttdley Baxter on National Debts 187
187
Mr Alfred Hayiland on a Proposed Rearrangement of the Registration
193
on the Compulsory Conversion of Substantial
196
Mr Thomas A Welton on Immigration and Emigration as affecting
203
Mr Gustav Bischof jun on a New System of Testing the Quality of
209
Mr Richard Eaton on certain Economical Improvements in obtaining Motive
215
Mr George Campbell on the Physical Geography and Races of British
218
W Hope on the History of the Shell that won the Battle of Sedan 219
219
Mr Robkrt Sabine Pneumatic Dispatch On Pneumatic Transmission
227
Mr Albany Hancocks Note on tho Larval State of Molyula with Descrip
242
Mr James Glaisher on the Temperature of the Air at 4 feet 22 feet
250
Mr W H L Russell on Linear Differential Equations 10
10
Prof J Clerk Maxwell on Hills and Dales 17
17
Professor J Henby on the Rainfall of the United States 36
36

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 232 - The Gods, who haunt The lucid interspace of world and world, Where never creeps a cloud, or moves a wind, Nor ever falls the least white star of snow, Nor ever lowest roll of thunder moans, Nor sound of human sorrow mounts to mar Their sacred everlasting calm!
Page 165 - And a river went out of Eden to water the garden; and from thence it was parted, and became into four heads. The name of the first is Pison: that is it which compasseth the whole land of Havilah, where there is gold; and the gold of that land is good: there is bdellium and the onyx stone.
Page xvii - Members of a Philosophical Institution recommended by its Council or Managing Committee, shall be entitled, in like manner, to become Members of the Association. Persons not belonging to such Institutions shall be elected by the General Committee or Council, to become Life Members of the Association, Annual Subscribers, or Associates for the year, subject to the approval of a General Meeting. COMPOSITIONS, SUBSCRIPTIONS, AND PRIVILEGES.
Page lxxxv - And thus mankind will have one more admonition that " the people perish for lack of knowledge " ; and that the alleviation of the miseries, and the promotion of the welfare, of men must be sought, by those who will not lose their pains, in that diligent, patient, loving study of all the multitudinous aspects of Nature, the results of which constitute exact knowledge, or Science.
Page lxxix - But though I cannot express this conviction of mine too strongly, I must carefully guard myself against the supposition that I intend to suggest that no such thing as Abiogenesis ever has taken place in the past or ever will take place in the future. With organic chemistry, molecular physics, and physiology yet in their infancy, and every day making prodigious strides, I think it would be the height of presumption for any man to sa^ that the conditions under which matter assumes the properties we...
Page lxxi - ... with maggots. You tell me that these are generated in the dead flesh ; but if I put similar bodies, while quite fresh, into a jar, and tie some fine gauze over the top of the jar, not a maggot makes its appearance, while the dead substances, nevertheless, putrefy just in the same way as before. It is obvious, therefore, that the maggots are not generated by the corruption of the meat ; and that the cause of their formation must be a something which is kept away by gauze. But gauze will not keep...
Page lxxxiv - I commenced this Address by asking you to follow me in an attempt to trace the path which has been followed by a scientific idea, in its long and slow progress from the position of a probable hypothesis to that of an established Law of Nature. Our survey has not taken us into very attractive regions ; it has lain chiefly in a land flowing with the abominable, and peopled with mere grubs and mouldiness.
Page lxx - Goethe, intends to speak as a philosopher, rather than as a poet, when he writes that " with good reason the earth has gotten the name of mother, since all things are produced out of the earth. And many living creatures, even now, spring out of the earth, taking form by the rains and the heat of the sun.
Page lxxxiv - Homogenesis ; and there is no reason, that I know of, for believing that what happens in insects may not take place in the highest animals. Indeed, there is already strong evidence that some diseases of an extremely malignant and fatal character to which man is subject are as much the work of minute organisms as is the Pebrine.
Page lxxx - ... should expect to see it appear under forms of great simplicity, endowed, like existing fungi, with the power of determining the formation of new protoplasm from such matters as ammonium carbonates, oxalates and tartrates, alkaline and earthy phosphates, and water, without the aid of light. That is the expectation to which analogical reasoning leads me ; but I beg you once more to recollect that I have no right to call my opinion anything but an act of philosophical faith.

Bibliographic information