A Sketch, Illustrative of the Minster and Antiquities of the City of Lincoln

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E.B. Drury, 1835 - Lincoln (England) - 108 pages
 

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Page 36 - English feet in circumference, and it would be a large tree of which the girth equalled the size of its middle. The hours are struck upon it with a hammer. I should tell you that the method of sounding bells in England is not by striking, but by swinging them : no bell however which approaches nearly to the size of this is ever moved, except this ; it is swung on Whitsunday, and when the judges arrive to try the prisoners,— another fit occasion would be at executions, to which it would give great...
Page 3 - The nearer we approached the more dreary was the country — it was one wide fen— but the more beautiful the city, and the more majestic the cathedral. Never was an edifice more happily placed ; it overtops a city built on the acclivity of a steep hill ; its houses intermingled with gardens and orchards. To see it in full perfection, it should be in the red sunshine of an autumnal evening ; when the red roofs, and red brick houses would harmonize with the sky and with the fading foliage.
Page 36 - We ascended one of the other towers afterwards to see Great Tom, the largest bell in England. At first it disappointed me, but the disappointment wore off, and we became satisfied that it was as great a thing as it was said to be. A tall man might stand in it, upright ; the mouth measures one and twenty...
Page 3 - The nearer we approached, the more dreary was the country — it was one wide fen; — the more beautiful the city, and the more majestic the cathedral : never was an edifice more happily placed ; it overtops a city built on the acclivity of a steep hill, its houses intermingled with gardens and orchards. To see it in full perfection it should be in the red sunshine of an autumnal evening when the red roofs, and red brick houses, would harmonize with the sty, and with the fading foliage.
Page 2 - marsh, and once more beheld the cathedral upon its height, two leagues distant. This magnificent building stands at the end of a long and high hill, above the city. To the north there are nine windmills in a row. It has three towers, the two smaller ones topped with the smallest spires I have ever seen; they were beautiful in the distance, yet we doubted whether they ought to have been there, and in fact they are of modern addition, and not of stone, so that on a nearer view they disgrace and disfigure...
Page 7 - AD 1380. John Welburn was treasurer. He built the tabernacle at the high altar, the north and east parts are now standing; and the south was rebuilt after, to make the north and south sides uniform. He was master of the fabric, and the principal promoter of making the two stone arches under the west towers, and the vault of the high tower ; and caused the statues of the kings over the west great door to be placed there.
Page 27 - Her manners so chearful, elegant, amiable, and winning, that, while she was admired, she was beloved ; and, while she enlightened and enlivened, she was the delight of the world in which she lived. She was formed for life ; she was prepared for death ; which being a gentle wafting to immortality, she lives where life is real.
Page 27 - Her person was that of animating; beauty, with a complexion of the most exquisite brilliancy, unfaded when she fell. Her understanding was of such quickness and reach of thought, that her knowledge, although she had learning, was instantaneous and original.
Page 37 - ... circumference, and it would be a large tree of which the girth equalled the size of its middle. The hours are struck upon it with a hammer. I should tell you that the method of sounding bells in England is not by striking, but by swinging them ; no bell, however, which approaches nearly to the size of .iiis is ever moved, except this; it is swung on Whitsunday, and when the judges arrive to try the prisoners, — another fit occasion...
Page 5 - Close wall, but not so fur to the east as it now is, for it was, as will be seen, further enlarged ; and he afterwards completely repaired, in concurrence with the dean and chapter, the old church ; so that the whole was finished, painted, and white-washed, after the year 1290. When this work was done, the great tower was carried up no higher than to the part where the large windows begin, and where the bells now hang. The upper part was, with the other new work, begun sixteen years after.

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