After Darwin: Animals, Emotions, and the Mind

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Angelique Richardson
Rodopi, Nov 10, 2013 - Literary Criticism - 369 pages
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‘What is emotion?’ pondered the young Charles Darwin in his notebooks. How were the emotions to be placed in an evolutionary framework? And what light might they shed on human-animal continuities? These were among the questions Darwin explored in his research, assisted both by an acute sense of observation and an extraordinary capacity for fellow feeling, not only with humans but with all animal life. After Darwin: Animals, Emotions, and the Mind explores questions of mind, emotion and the moral sense which Darwin opened up through his research on the physical expression of emotions and the human–animal relation. It also examines the extent to which Darwin’s ideas were taken up by Victorian writers and popular culture, from George Eliot to the Daily News. Bringing together scholars from biology, literature, history, psychology, psychiatry and paediatrics, the volume provides an invaluable reassessment of Darwin’s contribution to a new understanding of the moral sense and emotional life, and considers the urgent scientific and ethical implications of his ideas today.
 

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Contents

Darwin and Interdisciplinarity A Historical Perspective
1
Animal Feeling in the Century before Darwin
24
The Conception and Reception of Darwins Expression
51
Darwin and the Arts
89
Darwin and the Evolution of Sympathy
112
Animals Emotions and Morals
136
Sympathy and Other Emotional Investments in Life Writings by and about Charles Darwin
172
Darwin Affect and Contemporary Exhibition Projects
193
Neurological Responses to the Theory of Evolution 18701930
215
9 Darwins Changing Expression and the Making of the Modern State
236
Selection Domestication and Species
262
11 The Development of Emotional Life
281
The Emotional and Moral Lives of Animals What Darwin Would Have Said
305
Index
333
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