Sartor Resartus: The Life and Opinions of Herr Teufelsdrockh

Front Cover
The Floating Press, May 1, 2015 - Fiction - 251 pages
This unusual book is a must-read for fans of innovative fiction. More than a century before postmodernists like Nabokov and Barthes began to experiment with metafiction, Thomas Carlyle gave the world this playful sendup of German Idealism that purports to be a commentary on the work of fictional German philosopher Diogenes Teufelsdröckh's history of clothing.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - JBD1 - LibraryThing

Even now that I've read it I'm not entirely sure what prompted me to pick this up at the library book sale this spring. Probably it was the back-cover text noting that the book was inspired in part by ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - wellred2 - LibraryThing

Sartor Resartvs written and fascimile signed by Thomas Carlyle. The inside pages as shown in the photo have Thomas Carlyle's autograph under a photo and the date that it was signed (1865). The oposite ... Read full review

Contents

Chapter I Preliminary
6
Chapter II Editorial Difficulties
11
Chapter III Reminiscences
16
Chapter IV Characteristics
28
Chapter V The World in Clothes
34
Chapter VI Aprons
41
Chapter VII MiscellaneousHistorical
44
Chapter VIII The World Out of Clothes
49
Chapter VIII Centre of Indifference
152
Chapter IX The Everlasting Yea
164
Chapter X Pause
176
BOOK III
184
Chapter I Incident in Modern History
185
Chapter II ChurchClothes
191
Chapter III Symbols
195
Chapter IV Helotage
203

Chapter IX Adamitism
55
Chapter X Pure Reason
60
Chapter XI Prospective
66
BOOK II
75
Chapter I Genesis
76
Chapter II Idyllic
84
Chapter III Pedagogy
93
Chapter IV Getting Under Way
109
Chapter V Romance
121
Chapter VI Sorrows of Teufelsdrockh
134
Chapter VII The Everlasting No
144
Chapter V The Phoenix
207
Chapter VI Old Clothes
213
Chapter VII Organic Filaments
218
Chapter VIII Natural Supernaturalism
227
Chapter IX Circumspective
238
Chapter X The Dandiacal Body
243
Chapter XI Tailors
257
Chapter XII Farewell
261
Appendix
267
Endnotes
275
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2015)

Thomas Carlyle was a social critic and historian born in Ecclefechan, Dumfriesshire, Scotland, December 4, 1795, the same year as John Keats, but Carlyle is considered an early Victorian rather than a Romantic. After completing his elementary studies, he went to the University of Edinburgh but left in 1814 without a degree. His parents wanted him to become a minister in the Scottish church, but his independence of spirit made such a life program impossible. In 1816 he fell in love with, and was rejected by, a young woman. His love affair was followed by a period of doubt and uncertainty described vividly in Sartor Resartus, a work published in 1833 that attracted much attention. Carlyle's first literary work reveals his admiration for German thought and philosophy, and especially for the two great German poets Schiller and Goethe. The fictional autobiography of a philosopher deeply impressed Ralph Waldo Emerson who brought it back to the United States to be published there. History of the French Revolution (1837), rewritten after parts of it were mistakenly burned as kindling by John Stuart Mill, cemented Carlyle's reputation. The work brought him fame but no great wealth. As a result of his comparative poverty he was induced to give four series of public lectures. Of these the most famous were those On Heroes, Hero-Worship, and the Heroic of History delivered in 1840 and published in 1841. Past and Present (1843), and Latter Day Pamphlets (1850) present his economic and industrial theories. With The Letters and Speeches of Oliver Cromwell (1845), The Life of John Sterling (1851), and History of Frederick II of Prussia, Called Frederick the Great (1858-1865) he returned to biography. In 1865, Carlyle was made Lord Rector of Edinburgh.

Bibliographic information