History of Europe: From the Fall of Napoleon, in 1815, to the Accession of Louis Napoleon, in 1852, Volume 4

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W. Blackwood and sons, 1855 - Europe

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Contents

Splitting of farms for political purposes
10
Pernicious effects of the potato
11
Want of poorlaws
12
Absentee proprietors
14
Irregularity and uncertainty in the administration of justice
15
Intimidation of juries and witnesses
16
Catholic emancipation the only remedy proposed by English Liberals
17
Irish malcontents
18
Effects of that measure
19
Dublin theatre
20
Disturbed state of the country
21
Renewal of the Insurrection Act and composition for tithes
22
Debates on Irish corruption and Catholic emancipation
23
Improvement of the country in 1824
24
Mr Norths description of Irish miseries
25
Beneficial working of the TitheComposition Bill
26
Rise of the Catholic Association
27
Roman Catholic question in reference to England
29
Parliamentary Reform Alien Bill and reversal of Scottish attainders
30
Reflections on the Alien Act
31
Which was occasioned by the contraction of the currency
40
The bill is carried and immediately evaded
42
The bill is carried by a large majority in both Houses
56
What should have been done with the currency
62
Debate on the subject in the House of Commons
68
7678
76
Death of Diebitch and the Grandduke Constantine
78
Page 48 Kings message regarding Portugal
84
How this had come to pass
85
5053 Mr Cannings speech on the subject in the House of Commons 8688
86
Vast effect of this speech and the expedition sets out for Lisbon
89
Reflections on this point
90
Improved state of the country in the beginning of 1827
91
Death of the Duke of York
92
5859 His character
93
Illness and retirement of Lord Liverpool
95
Difficulty in the choice of his successor and Mr Cannings appointment
97
What made his Tory colleagues resign?
98
Composition of the new Cabinet
99
Importance of these events on Englands future history
100
Manner in which the changes were received in Parliament
101
Character of Lord Eldon who now retired from public life
102
His character as a statesman
103
The Catholic Bill is rejected
104
7276 Mr Peels speech against Catholic emancipation 105108
105
7778 Ministerial measure on the Corn Laws 108109
108
Result of the debate in the Commons and Lords
110
Important and curious things occurring in the course of the debate
111
Division on the question and interim admission of foreign grain
112
Other proceedings in Parliamentsilkweavers shipowners
114
Penryn and East Retford are convicted of bribery Commencement of the Reform question
115
Proud position of Mr Canning
116
His susceptible disposition and increasing illness ib 86 His last illness and death
117
Reflections on this event
118
Had he lived he would have disappointed their expectations
119
Review of his last acts
120
His character as a statesman and orator
121
Lord Goderich made premier and reconstruction of the Cabinet
122
Weakness of the new Cabinet and its cause ib 93 Impolitic reduction of the yeomapry
123
Dissolution of the Goderich Cabinet
124
The Duke of Wellington appointed premier and his Cabinet
125
Reconstruction of the Cabinet by Wellington
127
Notice of the battle of Navarino in the Kings speech
128
Finance Committee and Catholic question
129
Cornlaw Bill
130
Bill for the suppression of small notes
131
Repeal of the Test and Corporation Acts
133
104106 Argument for the repeal 134135
134
107108 Answer of Ministers 136138
136
The bill is carried in both Houses
138
Rapid increase of disturbances in Ireland
139
Facilities which the fortyshilling freeholders gave to their designs
140
The Catholic Association gets the complete command of the fortyshilling freeholders
141
Mr OConnell elected for the county of Clare
142
Immense results of this triumph
143
Mr Lawlesss progress to the north
144
Mr Sheils description of Ireland at this period
145
VOL IV
146
Proclamation of Government against the meetings
147
Meeting on Penenden Heath
148
The King in vain urges more vigorous measures against the Catholics
149
Difficulties with wbich the question was beset ib 123 Commencement of yielding in the Cabinet
151
Mr Dawsons speech at Londonderry
152
Ambiguous letter of the Duke of Wellington and explicit one of the LordLieutenant
153
Increased violence of the Catholic leaders
154
Difficulties which Ministers had with the King on the subject
156
Kings speech
158
Immense sensation which this speech excited in the country
159
130139 Argument of Mr Peel in favour of the Catholics 160166
160
140146 Answer of the antiCatholics 167172
170
Page
172
Division on the question and violent resistance to the bill in the country
173
Speech of the Duke of Wellington in the Lords on the subject
174
The bill is carried in the Peers and by a large majority
175
Great reluctance of the King to the bill ib 151 Bill for disfranchising the fortyshilling freeholders
177
Mr OConnells claim for a seat before the bill is rejected
178
The second Clare election
179
His violent language and ingratitude
180
Character of Mr OConnell
181
Explanations of his inconsistencies in the Catholic faith
182
His good qualities
183
Catholic emancipation a victory gained by the highly educated classes over the people 159 Aided by the contraction of the currency and the power o...
185
Great difference between the results of emancipation and what was pre dicted by all parties
186
Emancipation was a wise and great measure
187
Religious differences unavoidable when religion is thought of at all
188
Unworthy spirit in which emancipation was received by the Roman Catholics
189
How it was that Catholic emancipation failed
190
Its beneficial effects on the English government
191
Emancipation would have equally failed if granted earlier or if it had been more complete
192
Emancipation has brought a righteous retribution to both parties
193
First effect of emancipation in inducing reform
194
Effects of these changes on the population and Catholics of Ireland
195
Beneficial effect of these changes on the United Empire
197
Reaction against Catholicism in Great Britain
198
CHAPTER XXII
200
Great want of representation for the commercial towns
201
The interests of the boroughs now at variance with those of the country ib 4 Effects of the contraction of the currency on the desire for reform
202
Effect of Catholic agitation and its success in stimulating reform
204
Division among the Tories from the effect of the contraction of the currency
205
Catholic emancipation powerfully aided the desire for reform ib 8 Great effect of the entire suppression of small notes in March 1829
207
Motion on the distress of the silkweavers
208
The budget of 1829
209
Statement of Mr Attwood as to the causes of Irish distress and agitation
210
Mr Waithmans exposition of the effect of the monetary system on manu factures
211
Relations with Portugal and refusal of the English Government to inter fere in its concerns
212
The expedition to Terceira
213
And is beat off by the British squadron
214
Great distress in Great Britain and Ireland during the whole of 1829 ib 17 Serious riots in many places
216
And in Ireland where the agitation for the repeal of the Union commenced
217
Serious riots between Protestants and Catholics in Ireland
218
Meeting of Parliament
219
Interesting debate on the public distress in the House of Lords 220221
220
2324 Duke of Wellingtons reply 221222
221
Narrow division and declared changes in Parliament
223
Critical and painful position of the Duke of Wellington
224
Reflections on the Dukes explanation
225
Sir James Grahams motion for a reduction of the salaries of public officers
227
Mr Humes motion for a reduction of the army and navy lost
228
Mr Thomsons motion for a revision of the system of taxation
229
Ministers beat on a minor question
230
Motion of Mr Attwood on the currency ib 33 Financial measures and great reductions of Government
232
Taxes remitted on beer leather and cider
233
Great satisfaction at the Budget and its entire failure to relieve the general distress
234
3637 Mr Barings speech on the abandonment of the Sinking Fund 235236
235
Reflections on the abandonment of the Sinking Fund
237
Which arose from the repeal of so many indirect taxes
238
Rise of the political unions and their great influence
244
His personal character and Queen
251
Results of the election 337
255
Successive efforts of the agitators and their influence on the elections
257
Its political effects
263
Immense effect produced by this declaration
269
CHAPTER XXIII
275
What made the Dukes declaration against Reform so important Page
278
The difficulty in forming the new Ministry fixes Mr Broughams claims
279
Character of Earl Grey
280
His character as an orator and in private
281
His defects and errors but noble use of power when acquired
282
He was misled by others as to the effect of the Reform Bill ib 11 Character of Lord Brougham
283
His merits as a Judge
284
His character as a statesman
285
His style of oratory
286
his European reputation
287
His versatile talents and character
288
His character as a diplomatist and orator ib 18 His errors
289
Lord John Russell
290
His intrepidity and selfconfidence 231
292
his administrative powers
293
His inconsistencies ib 24 Earl Greys announcement of his principles of government
294
Distracted state of England during the winter
295
Agitation and increased misery in Ireland
296
Agitation for the repeal of the Union and prosecution of Mr OConnell who is allowed to escape
298
The budget which is defeated
300
Description of taxes to be taken off and put on ib b 30 Committee on the Reform Bill
302
Feeling and petitions of the country
303
Introduction of the Reform Bill by Lord John Russell
304
3341 Argument of the Ministers in favour of the bill 305310
305
Ministerial plan of reform
311
4344 Qualification of voters The 10 clause
313
Plan as to Scotland and Ireland
314
Astonishment in the House at the bill
315
4753 Argument against the bill 316322
316
ear sion of Conservatives and Reformers which ensued in the country
323
Agitation in the country
324
Courageous petition from the merchants and bankers of London against the bill
325
Second reading of the bill carried by a majority of one
326
General Gascoignes motion is carried against Government by eight
328
Dangers on both sides in ulterior measures ib 60 Liberal settlement on the Royal Family
329
Efforts made to won the King by his vanity
330
Means by which the King was induced to dissolve Parliament
331
How the Kings resistance is overcome
332
Violent scene in the House of Commons
333
Scene in the House of Peers when the King dissolved Parliament
334
Dissolution of Parliament and elections
335
Dreadful riots in Scotland
336
Preparations for insurrection by the political unions
338
Universal delusions which prevailed among the people
339
Rare examples of resistance to the general cry
340
Kings speech on opening Parliament
341
The Reform Bill is carried by a majority of 136
342
Discussion on particular boroughs Appleby ib 75 Motion to give members to the colonies negatived without a division
344
Marquess of Chandos motion on 50 tenants carried
345
Bill read a third time and passed
346
7980 Lord Greys speech in the House of Lords 347348
347
Bill thrown out by a majority of fortyone
349
Vote of confidence in the Commons carried by 131
350
Temporary relaxation of the Corn Laws
351
Riots at Derby and Nottingham
352
Commencement of riots at Bristol
353
Frightful disorders
354
Immense destruction of property
355
The riots are at once suppressed when the military are ordered to act
356
Good effects of these dreadful scenes
357
Disturbances in other quarters
358
Proclamation against political unions
359
The new Reform Bill introduced
360
Increased democratic character of the new bill
361
Division on the bill and Sir R Peels speech against it ib 96 Third reading carried in the Commons by 116 and Lord J Russells closing declaration
362
General distress in the country and Mr Hunts motion regarding it
363
Declining state of the public revenue
364
State of Ireland
365
Dreadful tithe outrages in Wexford and Newtonbarry
366
Resolution of the Cabinet to create Peers ib 102 The King is violently agitated and reluctantly consents
367
Secret negotiations with the waverers
368
Revolutionary meetings to coerce the Peers
369
Second reading of the bill carried by a majority of nine
370
Lord Lyndhursts amendment carried by thirtyfive ib 107 Ministers resign and their resignation is accepted
371
The King sends for the Duke of Wellington to form a ministry ib 109 Vehement excitement in the country
372
The Duke fails in forming an administration
374
Lord Ebringtons motion in the House of Commons carried by eighty
375
The King submits and gives authority to create Peers
376
The Kings circular to the Opposition Peers to leave the House of Peers
377
Reflections on this event and on the act
378
The bill passes both Houses and receives the royal assent
379
The Scotch and Irish bills passed
380
Its lasting and important effects
381
General results of the Reform Bill on the Imperial Parliament
382
Reflections on this change in the Constitution of England as affecting our external relations
383
And as affecting our internal and social state
384
The vast emigration is chiefly owing to the changes produced by the Reform Bill
385
Principle of the old constitution
386
And which was only rendered worse by the talent which got in by the close boroughs
395
Which explains the changes of general opinion during the reform move ment
396
The new constituencies were some time of discovering their own power
397
Great mistake in the estimate of the effect of the Reform Bill
398
Command of the House of Commons gained by the shopkeepers ib 137 Errors on both sides during the contest
400
Great and early fault of the Conservatives ib 139 What they should have done
401
The Duke of Wellingtons declaration against reform
403
Faults of the Liberals first in forcing on reform at all at this time
404
Great error in the uniform representation in the boroughs
405
Mistake of the Whigs as to the influence in the boroughs
406
Which led to the practical disfranchisement of the colonies and shipping interests
407
And they were subjected to the government of adverse interests
408
Prospective abandonment of our colonial empire
410
Which is defended by the Government and Freetraders ib 150 Labour was unrepresented
411
Want of the representation of intelligence and education
412
Dangers arising from this circumstance
413
its danger
414
Vast increase of corruption under the Reform Bill
415
Great fault of the Liberals in the way the Reform Bill was carried
416
Wisdom of the Duke of Wellingtons advice to the majority in the Peers
417
to withdraw
418
Summary of the faults on both sides
419
The producing classes were still the majority in number and value ib 161 The Reform Bill has strengthened Government by enlarging its basis
420
Where the risk now lies
421
Way in which the monied classes had got the command of the pro ducing
422
Enormous sums spent by working classes in Great Britain on drink
423
Is this the result of a general law of nature ? ib 166 Great political truth evolved by the Reform Bill
424
Its exemplification in France and England ib 168 Great law of nature on the subject
425
Which is intended to limit population in the later stages of society
426
CHAPTER XXIV
427
The real evils of society are not so certainly removed by these convulsions
428
Prosperity of the bourgeois class ib 4 The interests of the bourgeoisie were adverse to those of labour
429
Effect of the spread of machinery steam and railways
430
Increased strength of the Government
431
their chances of success
432
their chances
433
their chances
434
The Duke of Orléans remains in retirement
435
Important conversation between the Baron de Glandevès and Lafitte ib 13 Arguments for and against the Dukes being called to the crown
436
Project of giving the lieutenancygeneral to the Duke of Orléans and the crown to the Duke of Bordeaux
437
First placards in the Orléans interest
438
Situation of the Duke of Orléans
439
Interview between M Thiers and the Duchess of Orléans ib 18 Irresolute conduct of the Duke of Orléans
440
Meetings of the Deputies and Peers
441
Meeting at the Chamber of Peers
442
Reunion of the Republicans at Lointiers
443
Scene at the Hôtel de Ville ib 23 Continued indecision at the Hôtel de Ville
444
Easy defeat of the Napoleonists
446
Panic of the Orléanists at Lafittes ib 26 Arrival of the Duke of Orléans at Paris and his interview with M de Mortemart
447
The Duke accepts the lieutenancygeneral of the kingdom
448
Guizots proclamation of the principles of the Government
449
Visit of the Duke of Orléans to the Hôtel de Ville
451
Reflections on this interview
453
Efforts of the Orléanists to popularise the new dynasty ib 33 Conversation between the Duke of Orléans and the Republicans
454
3439 Noble speech of Chateaubriand 455459
455
Chateaubriand refuses the portfolio of foreign affairs
460
Acceptance of the crown by Louis Philippe
461
Speeches on the occasion of his accepting the constitution
462
Changes in the constitution of the Revolution
463
Peers who resigned and Ministers who were appointed
464
Grievous distress in Paris
465
Reception of the Revolution at Lyons Bordeaux and in the provinces
466
Recognition of Louis Philippe by the English Government
467
Manner in which he is received by the Continental sovereigns
468
His recognition by the cabinet of Vienna
470
opposite views of it
471
Explanation of its seeming contradictions
472
Features good and bad of his character ib 54 Vicissitudes of his life and impress they had affixed to his character
473
Extreme difficulties with which he had to contend
474
Dissensions in the Council and violence of the National Guard deputa tion
475
Suspicious death and testament of the Duke de Bourbon
476
Injurious reports spread abroad by the bequest of the Dukes property to the Duke dAumale
477
Attitude of M de Lafayette and its dangers
478
Disturbances in Paris ib 61 First legislative measures of the new Government
479
Discussion on the Electoral Law ib 63 First financial measures of the new Government
480
Proceedings against the popular societies ib 65 Speech of the Minister of the Interior on the subject
481
Attempt to revolutionise Spain from Paris
482
Which is secretly favoured by Louis Philippe and his Ministers ib 68 The enterprise is undertaken and fails
483
State of Belgium and its dispositions
485
Causes of discord among the inhabitants
486
Revolutionary party in Belgium and its great increase by the events in Paris in July
487
Commencement of the revolution ib 73 Progress of the insurrection
488
Negotiations of the insurgents with the King
489
Demands of the leaders of the revolution
490
Speech of the King on opening the Chambers
491
The army is directed by the King and Chambers on Brussels
492
Prince Frederick attacks Brussels
493
The Dutch troops are in the end defeated and retire to Antwerp ib 80 The insurrection extends generally and the separation of Belgium and Holland i...
495
State of political feeling in Germany
496
Disturbances in AixlaChapelle and Cologne
497
In Dresden Leipsic and Brunswick
498
And in Brunswick
499
Political contests in Switzerland ib 87 Convulsions in Italy
501
Change in the order of succession in Spain ib 89 Its motives and political objects
502
Promulgation of the decree
503
Resumé of the influence of the Revolution in France over Europe
504
CHAPTER XXV
506
Cabinet divisions and fall of the Ministry
507
Commencement of the trial of the late Ministers
508
Conduct of the accused before the trial
509
Disturbed state of Paris before this
510
Commencement of the trial
511
Dissolution of the Administration
512
Formation of M Lafittes ministry
514
Lafittes statement of the principles of his ministry
515
Progress of the trial of the ex ministers
516
Arguments of M Sauzet for the accused ib 12 Condemnation and punishment of the accused
517
The accused are safely conveyed to Vincennes and thence to Ham
518
Disaffection of the National Guard and the misery of the capital
519
Demands of Lafayette
521
Changes in the Cabinet
522
Favourable accounts from Algiers
523
Great additional expenditure for the army and its forces
524
Competition for the crown of Belgium and its final separation from Hol land
525
Crown of Belgium offered to Duke de Nemours
526
Protocol Jan 20 1831 fixing limits of Holland and Belgium
527
Views in London and Paris on Louis Philippes refusal ib 24 Weak and distracted state of Belgium
528
Perilous state of Italy
529
Insurrections in Bologna Modena Reggio and Parma
530
Intervention of Austria in Italy
532
Entry of the Austrians into Bologna and suppression of the insurrection ib 29 Affairs of Germany and precautionary measures there
533
Defensive measures in Austria
534
State of feeling in Prussia
535
Great fermentation in the lesser states of Germany
536
Troubles in Saxony and HesseCassel
538
Violence of parties and misery in Paris
539
Alarming budget of 1831 and its effects
541
Universal indignation it excited
542
Deplorable situation of commerce and credit
543
General indignation of the democrats
544
Extravagant ideas generally afloat in society at this time ib 41 State of corruption into which the system of centralisation had sunk France
546
Moral statistics of Paris at this period ib 43 Tumult in the church of St Germain lAuxerrois
547
Sack of the church
548
Sack of Archbishops palace at Nôtre Dame
549
Attacks on individuals and deplorable weakness of Government
550
Fall of Lafitte and appointment of Casimir Périer in his stead
551
Views of parties on this change of Ministry
552
Change in the Electoral Law
553
Proscription of the elder branch of the Bourbons
554
Violent opposition of the liberal journals to Casimir Périer and forma tion of the National Association
555
Casimir Périers speech on the principles of his government ib 53 Continued in reference to foreign affairs
556
Louis Philippes efforts to conciliate the electors
557
Disturbances in Paris
558
The Kings progresses into Normandy and Champagne
559
Unfavourable issue of the elections for the Crown
560
Kings speech
561
Defeat of the Government on the choice of President and VicePresident ib 60 Affairs of Holland and Flanders
562
What the London congress should have done
563
Views of Talleyrand and Lord Palmerston
564
Reasons which led them to support the Belgians
565
Leopold of SaxeCobourg elected King of Belgium ib 65 Change which this election made on the views of Holland and Belgium
566
Change in the policy of Great Britain regarding Belgium
567
Change in the language of England and France regarding Luxembourg
568
Progress of the negotiation and secret treaty of France and England
569
The five powers deviate from the Act of Separation and the King of Hol land declares war
570
Commencement of hostilities and position and forces on the two sides
571
Total defeat of the Belgians
572
Intervention of the French army in Flanders
573
Armistice and withdrawal of the French troops ib 74 Renewed conferences and reasons which made the northern powers acquiesce in them
574
Great advantages gained by Holland by this irruption
575
Forcible intervention of the French at Lisbon
576
The French compel the submission of the Portuguese government
577
Vehement excitement in Paris from these events
578
7981 Argument of the Opposition on foreign affairs 579581
579
8284 Answer of Ministers 581583
580
Violent scene in the Chamber on the debate on Poland
584
Vehement excitement in Paris on the fall of Warsaw
585
Bloody law against the Bourbons
586
Speech of M Pagès against the law
587
Striking speech of M de Martignac which causes the rejection of the clause
588
Question of the abolition of the hereditary peerage
589
9195 Argument for the abolition 590593
590
96101 Answer of the defenders of the peerage 594598
594
The Lower House pass the bill by a great majority
598
Creation of peers to force it through the Upper House where it passes
599
Reflections on this event
600
Previous degradation of the hereditary peerage
601
Experience of Great Britain in regard to a hereditary peerage
602
Reason of the superiority in general of the aristocracy as statesmen
603
Increased vigour and capacity this gives to the higher branches of the aristocracy
604
Importance of the interests of the hereditary peers being identified with those of production
605
CHAPTER XXVI
606
Causes of this perpetual strife
607
Opposite sources of their strength and weakness
608
Disastrous effects of the conquest of the Byzantine Empire by the Turks and of the partition of Poland
609
Sin of Europe in the partition of Poland
610
Vast increase of the power of Russia from the partition of Poland
611
Faults of the Poles which led to their subjugation ib 8 It was the impatience of taxation which ruined Poland
612
Mysterious connection between Poland and the cause of democracy
614
Prosperity of Poland under the Russian rule from 1815 to 1830
615
This prosperity increased the passion for independence
616
Secret societies in Poland
617
Different plans of the conspirators
618
Original plan which proved abortive
619
Supineness of Constantine and progress of the conspiracy ib 16 Insurrection of 29th November at Warsaw
620
Rapid progress of the insurrection and retreat of Constantine from Warsaw 18 Appointment of a provisional government
621
Constantine sends back the Polish troops and retreats into Russia
624
Enthusiasm on the arrival of the Polish troops in Warsaw
625
Chlopicki seizes the dictatorship
626
his biography and character
627
His views in regard to the revolution
628
Strange conduct of Constantine
629
Unsuccessful negotiations with Nicholas
630
Preparations and conference of Austria Prussia and Russia
631
Secret views of Austria and France at this juncture
632
Great Britain declines to join France in interfering in favour of Poland
633
Chlopicki resigns the dictatorship on the meeting of the Diet 20th December and is reappointed
634
His first acts after his appointment
635
Menacing proclamation and vast preparations of the Czar
636
3438 Manifesto of the Polish Diet 637640
637
Chlopickis vain efforts to bring about an accommodation
641
The Czar is dethroned by the Diet
642
Statistics of the strength of Russia at this period
643
Statistics of the kingdom of Poland
644
Statistics of Austrian and Prussian Poland
645
Statistics of Lithuania and Russian Poland
646
Military forces on the opposite sides
647
Strategetical advantages of the Poles ib 47 Advance of Diebitch towards Warsaw
648
Position and forces on the opposite sides
649
Battle of Grochow
650
Battle of Praga
651
Desperate and bloody nature of the conflict ib 52 Results of these battles
653
Splendid success of Dwernicki on the Polish right ib 54 Parallel of Grochow and Sieroczyn with Inkermann and Balaklava
655
Operations of Dwernicki on the left bank of the Vistula ib 56 Skrzynecki appointed generalissimo by the Diet
657
His biography and character ib 58 Ineffectual attempts at a negotiation and vigorous preparations of Skrzynecki
658
Skrzyneckis plan of operations
659
Forces at his disposal ib 61 Skrzyneckis brilliant success in the centre
661
Total defeat of the Russians ib 63 Great success of the Poles in the pursuit
662
Chances which now awaited Skrzynecki
663
Opinion of Prondzynski and others which is not adopted
664
Victory of the Poles at Iganie
665
Cholera breaks out in the Polish army which is arrested in its advance
666
Bad success of Sierawiki on the right ib 69 Defeat of Dwernicki in Volhynia who is obliged to take refuge in Gallicia
667
Insurrection in Podolia and the Ukraine and its final discomfiture
669
Operations in the centre ib 72 Expedition of Chrzanowski into Volhynia and its defeat
670
March of Skrzynecki against the Russian right
671
Diebitch marches against the Polish rear
672
Battle of Ostrolenka
673
Repulse of the Poles ib 77 Its results
674
Excess of democracy in Poland ruined everything
691

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Page 376 - The King grants permission to Earl Grey, and to his Chancellor, Lord Brougham, to create such a number of peers as will be sufficient to ensure the passing of the Reform Bill, first calling peers' eldest sons. — Signed, WILLIAM R., Windsor, May 17, 1832.
Page 88 - ... source of confidence and security; but in the situation in which this country stands, our business is not to seek opportunities of displaying it, but to content ourselves with letting the professors of violent and exaggerated doctrines on both sides feel, that it is not their interest to convert an umpire into an adversary. The situation of England, amidst the struggle of political opinions which agitates more or less sensibly different countries of the world, may be compared to that of the Ruler...
Page 158 - Constitution; which keeps alive discord and ill-will amongst His Majesty's Subjects; and which must, if permitted to continue, effectually obstruct every effort, permanently to improve the condition of Ireland. His Majesty confidently relies on the wisdom and on the support of His Parliament ; and His Majesty feels assured, that you will commit...
Page 266 - Statesgeneral should have led to no satisfactory result. I am endeavouring, in concert with my Allies, to devise such means of restoring tranquillity as may be compatible with the welfare and good government of the Netherlands, and with the future security of other states.
Page 128 - ... Notwithstanding the valour displayed by the combined fleet, His Majesty deeply laments that this conflict should have occurred with the naval force of an ancient ally ; but he still entertains a confident hope that this untoward event will not be followed by further hostilities, and will not impede that amicable adjustment of the existing differences between the Porte and the Greeks, to which it is so manifestly their common interest to accede.
Page 333 - Yes, sir," said the Chancellor, 'I do know it; and nothing but my thorough knowledge of your Majesty's goodness, of your paternal anxiety for the good of your people, and my own solemn belief that the safety of the state depends upon this day's proceedings, could have emboldened me to the performance of so unusual, and, in ordinary circumstances, so improper a proceeding. In all humility...

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