Page images
PDF
EPUB

3

38

Spying the tree destroid, the water dride, Then heauenly branches did I see arise Himselfe smote with his beake, as in disdaine, Out of the fresh and lustie Lawrell tree, 30 And so foorthwith in great despight he dide : Amidst the yong greene wood: of Paradise That yet my heart burnes in exceeding paine, Some noble plant I thought my selfe to see: For ruth and pitie of so haples plight.

Such store of birds therein yshrowded were, O let mine eyes no more see such a sight. 70 Chaunting in shade their sundrie melodie, That with their sweetnes I was rauish't nere.

6 While on this Lawrell fixed was mine eie,

At last so faire a Ladie did I spie, The skie gan euerie where to ouercast,

That thinking yet on her I burne and quake; And darkned was the welkin all about,

On hearbs and flowres she walked pensiuely, When sudden flash of heauens fire out brast, Milde, but yet loue she proudly did forsake : And rent this royall tree quite by the roote,

White seem'd her robes, yet wouen so they Which makes me much andeuer to complaine:

were, For no such shadow shalbe had againe. As snow and golde together had been wrought.

Aboue the wast a darke clowde shrouded her, 4

A stinging Serpent by the heele her caught; Within this wood, out of a rocke did rise Wherewith she languisht as the gathered A spring of water, mildly rumbling downe, floure, Whereto approched not in anie wise

And well assur'd she mounted vp to ioy. 80 The homely shepheard, nor the ruder clowne; Alas, on earth so nothing doth endure,

But manie Muses, and the Nymphes withall, But bitter griefe and sorrowfull annoy : That sweetly in accord did tune their voyce Which make this life wretched and miserable, To the soft sounding of the waters fall, 49 Tossed with stormes of fortune variable. That my glad hart thereat did much reioyce. But while herein I tooke my chiefe delight,

7

When I behold this tickle trustles state I saw (alas) the gaping earth deuoure The spring, the place, and all cleane out of Of vaine worlds glorie, flitting too and fro, sight.

And mortall men tossed by troublous fate Which yet aggreeues my hart euen to this In restles seas of wretchednes and woe, houre,

I wish I might this wearie life forgoe, And wounds my soule with rufull memorie, And shortly turne vnto my happie rest, 90 To see such pleasures gon so suddenly.

Where my free spirite might not anie moe

Be vext with sights, that doo her peace molest. 5

And ye faire Ladie, in whose bounteous brest I saw a Phænix in the wood alone,

All heauenly grace and vertue shrined is, With purple wings, and crest of golden hewe; When ye these rythmes doo read, and vew the Strange bird he was, whereby I thought anone, rest, That of some heauenly wight I had the vewe; Loath this base world, and thinke of heauens

Vntill he came vnto the broken tree, 61 And to the spring, that late deuoured was. And though ye be the fairest of Gods creatures, What say I more ? each thing at last we see Yet thinke, that death shall spoyle your goodly Doth passe away : the Phoenix there alas

features.

blis :

An Elegie vpon the

death of the noble and vertuous
Douglas Howard, Daughter and
heire of Henry Lord Howard, Vis-
count Byndon, and wife of Ar-

thure Gorges Esquier. Dedicated to the Right honorable the Lady Helena, Marquesfe of Northampton.

By Ed. Sp.

[graphic][subsumed][ocr errors][ocr errors]

AT LONDON Printed for William Ponsonby,dwelling in Paules Churchyard at the ligne of the

Bilhops head 1591.

3

Spying the tree destroid, the water dride, Then heauenly branches did I see arise Himselfe smote with his beake, as in disdaine, Out of the fresh and lustie Lawrell tree, 30 And so foorthwith in great despight he dide: Amidst the yong greene wood: of Paradise That yet my heart burnes in exceeding paine, Some noble plant I thought my selfe to see : For ruth and pitie of so haples plight.

Such store of birds therein yshrowded were, O let mine eyes no more see such a sight. 70 Chaunting in shade their sundrie melodie, That with their sweetnes I was rauish't nere.

6 While on this Lawrell fixed was mine eie,

At last so faire a Ladie did I spie, The skie gan euerie where to ouercast,

That thinking yet on her I burne and quake; And darkned was the welkin all about, 38 On hearbs and flowręs she walked pensiuely, When sudden flash of heauens fire out brast,

Milde, but yet loue she proudly did forsake: And rent this royall tree quite by the roote,

White seem'd her robes, yet wouen so they Which makes me much andeuer to complaine:

were, For no such shadow shalbe had againe.

As snow and golde together had been wrought.

Aboue the wast a darke clowde shrouded her, 4

A stinging Serpent by the heele her caught; Within this wood, out of a rocke did rise Wherewith she languisht as the gathered A spring of water, mildly rumbling downe, floure, Whereto approched not in anie wise

And well assur'd she mounted vp to ioy. So The homely shepheard, nor the ruder clowne; Alas, on earth so nothing doth endure,

But manie Muses, and the Nymphes withall, But bitter griefe and sorrowfull annoy:
That sweetly in accord did tune their voyce Which make this life wretched and miserable,
To the soft sounding of the waters fall, 49

Tossed with stormes of fortune variable.
That my glad hart thereat did much reioyce.
But while herein I tooke my chiefe delight,

7 I saw (alas) the gaping earth deuoure

When I behold this tickle trustles state The spring, the place, and all cleane out of Of vaine worlds glorie, flitting too and fro, sight.

And mortall men tossed by troublous fate Which yet aggreeues my hart euen to this In restles

seas of wretchednes and woe, houre,

I wish I might this wearie life forgoe, And wounds my soule with rufull memorie, And shortly turne vnto my happie rest, 90 To see such pleasures gon so suddenly.

Where my free spirite might not anie moe

Be vext with sights, that doo her peace molest. 5

And ye faire Ladie, in whose bounteous brest I saw a Phoenix in the wood alone, All heauenly grace and vertue shrined is, With purple wings, and crest of golden hewe; When ye these rythmes doo read, and vew the Strange bird he was, whereby I thought anone, rest, That of some heauenly wight I had the vewe; Loath this base world, and thinke of heauens Vntill he came vnto the broken tree, 61

blis : And to the spring, that late deuoured was. And though ye be the fairest of Gods creatures, What say I more? each thing at last we see Yet thinke, that death shall spoyle your goodly Doth passe away: the Phenix there alas

features.

An Elegie vpon the

death of the

noble and vertuous
Douglas Howard, Daughter and
heire of Henry Lord Howard, Vis-
count Byndon, and wife of Ar-

thurc Gorges Esquier. Dedicated to the Right honorable the Lady Helena, Marquesfe of Northampton.

By Ed. Sp.

[graphic][subsumed][ocr errors]

AT LONDON Printed for William Ponsonby,dwelling in Paules Churchyard at the signe of the

Bilbops head 1591.

TO THE RIGHT HONORABLE AND VERtuous Lady Helena Marquesse of

North-hampton. I

Haue the rather presumed humbly to offer so lineally are they descended from the Howards, vnto your Honour the dedication of this little as that the Lady Anne Howard, eldest daughter Poëme, for that the noble and vertuous Gentle- to Iohn Duke of Norfolke, was wife to Sir woman of whom it is written, was by match neere Edmund, mother to Sir Edward, and grandalied, and in affection greatly deuoted unto your mother to Sir William and Sir Thomas Gorges Ladiship. The occasion why I wrote the same, Knightes. And therefore I doe assure my selfe, was aswell the great good fame which I heard of that no due honour done to the white Lyon but her deceassed, as the particular goodwill which will be most gratefull to your Ladiship, whose I beare unto her husband Master Arthur Gorges, husband and children do so neerely participate a louer of learning and vertue, whose house, as with the bloud of that noble family. So in all your Ladiship by mariage hath honoured, so doe dutie I recommende this Pamphlet, and the good I find the name of them by many notable records, acceptance thereof, to your honourable fauour

and to be of great antiquitie in this Realme ; and protection. London this first of Ianuarie. 1591. such as haue euer borne themselues with honour

Your Honours humbly euer. able reputation to the world, and vnspotted loyaltie to their Prince and Countrey : besides

Ed. Sp.

Daphnaïda.

a

II

W

With griefe of mournefull great mishap In open fields, whose flowring pride opprest opprest,

With early frosts, had lost their beautie faire. Fit matter for his cares increase would finde: Let reade the rufull plaint herein exprest

There came vnto my minde a troublous thought, Of one (I weene) the wofulst man aliue ;

Which dayly dooth my weaker wit possesse, Euen sad Alcyon, whose empierced brest

Ne lets it rest, vntill it forth haue brought 31 Sharpe sorrowe did in thousand peeces riue.

Her long borne Infant, fruit of heauinesse,

Which she conceiued hath through meditation But who so else in pleasure findeth sense,

Of this worlds vainnesse and lifes wretched. Or in this wretched life dooth take delight,

nesse, Let him be banisht farre away from hence:

That yet my soule it deepely doth empassion. Ne let the sacred Sisters here be hight, Though they of sorrowe heauilie can sing ; So as I muzed on the miserie, Foreuen their heauiesong would breede delight: In which men live, and I of many most, But here notunes,sauesobsandgrones shall ring. Most miserable man; I did espie In stead of them, and their sweete harmonie,

Where towards me a sory wight did cost, Let those three fatall Sisters, whose sad hands Clad all in black, that mourning did bewray: Doo weaue the direfull threds of destinie,

And laakob staffe in hand deuoutlie crost, 41 And in their wrath breake off the vitall bands, Like to some Pilgrim come from farre away. Approach hereto: and let the dreadfull Queene His carelesse locks, vncombed and vnshorne, of darkenes deepe come from the Stygian Hong long adowne, and beard all ouer growne, strands,

20 That well he seemd to be sum wight forlorne ; And grisly Ghosts to heare this dolefull teene. Downe to the earth his heauie eyes were In gloomie euening, when the wearie Sun throwne After his dayes long labour drew to rest, As loathing light: and euer as he went, And sweatie steeds now hauing ouer run He sighed soft, and inly deepe did grone, The compast skie, gan water in the west, As if his heart in peeces would haue rent.

« PreviousContinue »