Critical Path

Front Cover
Macmillan, Feb 15, 1982 - Architecture - 471 pages
8 Reviews

The masterwork of a brilliant career, and an important document of the crisis now facing mankind.

Today we find ourselves in the midst of the greatest crisis in the history of the human race. Technology has placed in our hands almost unlimited power at the very moment when we have run up against the limits of our resources aboard Spaceship Earth, as the crises of the late twentieth century—political, economic, environmental, and ethical—determine whether or not humanity survives. In this masterful summing up of an entire lifetime’s thought and concern, R. Buckminster Fuller addresses these crucial issues in his most significant, accessible, and urgent work.

Critical Path traces the origins and evolution of humanity’s social, political, and economic systems from the obscure mists of prehistory, through the development of the great political empires, to the vast international corporate and political systems that control our destiny today to show how we got to our present situation and what options are available to man. With his customary brilliance, extraordinary energy, and unlimited devotion, Bucky Fuller shows how mankind can survive, and how each individual can respond to the unprecedented threat we face today.

The crowning achievement of an extraordinary career, Critical Path offers the reader the excitement of understanding the essential dilemmas of our time and how responsible citizens can rise to meet this ultimate challenge to our future. 

 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
3
4 stars
3
3 stars
1
2 stars
1
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - aneurysm1985 - LibraryThing

The title of Buckminster Fuller's classic late-life book Critical Path is inspired by the Apollo Project. Bucky estimated that in order for Apollo 11 to successfully launch, land on the moon, and ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - seaward - LibraryThing

R. Buckminster Fuller is regarded as one of the most important figures of the 20th century, renowned for his achievements as an inventor, designer, architect, philosopher, mathematician, and dogged ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Speculative Prehistory of Humanity
3
Humans in Universe
25
Legally Piggily
60
SelfDisciplines of Fuller
123
The Geoscope
161
World Game
198
Critical Path Part One
229
Critical Path Part Two
252
Critical Path Part Three
270
Critical Path Part Four
309
Chronology of Scientific Discoveries and Artifacts
347
Chronological Inventory of Prominent Scientific Technological Economic and Political World Events 1895 to Date
378
Index
411
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xii - To be nobody-but-yourself — in a world which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody else — means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight; and never stop fighting.
Page x - If all the good people were clever, And all clever people were good, The world would be nicer than ever We thought that it possibly could. But somehow 'tis seldom or never The two hit it off as they should; The good are so harsh to the clever, The clever so rude to the good!

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1982)

Buckminster Fuller (1895 - 1983) was an architect, engineer, geometrician, cartographer, philosopher, futurist, inventor of the famous geodesic dome, and one of the most brilliant thinkers of his time. Fuller was renowned for his comprehensive perspective on the world's problems. For more than five decades, he developed pioneering solutions reflecting his commitment to the potential of innovative design to create technology that does "more with less" and thereby improve human lives. The author of nearly 30 books, he spent much of his life traveling the world lecturing and discussing his ideas with thousands of audiences. In 1983, shortly before his death, he received the U.S. Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, with a citation acknowledging that his "contributions as a geometrician, educator, and architect-designer are benchmarks of accomplishment in their fields." After Fuller's death, a team of chemists won the Nobel Prize for discovering a new carbon molecule with a structure similar to that of a geodesic dome, they named the molecule "buckminsterfullerene"—now commonly referred to in the scientific community as the buckyball.