A Historical Perspective on Evidence-Based Immunology

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Newnes, Nov 25, 2015 - Medical - 394 pages
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A Historical Perspective on Evidence-Based Immunology focuses on the results of hypothesis-driven, controlled scientific experiments that have led to the current understanding of immunological principles. The text helps beginning students in biomedical disciplines understand the basis of immunologic knowledge, while also helping more advanced students gain further insights.

The book serves as a crucial reference for researchers studying the evolution of ideas and scientific methods, including fundamental insights on immunologic tolerance, interactions of lymphocytes with antigen TCR and BCR, the generation of diversity and mechanism of tolerance of T cells and B cells, the first cytokines, the concept of autoimmunity, the identification of NK cells as a unique cell type, the structure of antibody molecules and identification of Fab and Fc regions, and dendritic cells.

  • Provides a complete review of the hypothesis-driven, controlled scientific experiments that have led to our current understanding of immunological principles
  • Explains the types of experiments that were performed and how the interpretation of the experiments altered the understanding of immunology
  • Presents concepts such as the division of lymphocytes into functionally different populations in their historical context
  • Includes fundamental insights on immunologic tolerance, interactions of lymphocytes with antigen TCR and BCR, and the generation of diversity and mechanism of tolerance of T and B cells
 

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Contents

23 T Lymphocyte Subpopulations
197
From TS to TREG
207
25 Intercellular Communication in the Immune System
217
26 AntibodyMediated Effector Mechanisms
227
27 TLymphocyteMediated Effector Mechanisms
235
Natural Killer NK and Natural Killer T NKT Lymphocytes
243
29 Role of Dendritic Cells in the Adaptive Immune Response
253
30 The Mucosal Immune System and Secretory IgA
261

9 The Thymus in Lymphocyte Maturation
69
10 The Bursa of Fabricius in Lymphocyte Maturation
75
11 Revealing the Structure of the Immunoglobulin Molecule
83
12 Complement
95
13 Antibody Production Requires ThymusDerived and Bone Marrow BursaDerived Lymphocyte Interactions
105
Role of Adherent Cells
113
15 Recognition Structures on Cells of the Innate Host Defense Mechanisms
121
16 The Adaptive Immune Response and Histocompatibility Genes
129
Identification of AntigenSpecific Receptors
141
18 Generation of Diversity in the Adaptive Immune Response
151
19 B Lymphocyte Activation
159
20 Activation of T Lymphocytes and MHC Restriction
169
21 Development of Tolerance to Self in B Lymphocytes
181
22 Development of Tolerance to Self in T Lymphocytes
189
31 Disorders of the Innate Host Defenses
269
32 Defects in the Adaptive Immune Response Leading to Recurrent Infections
277
33 Pathologies Resulting from Aberrant Immune Responses
287
34 Immune Responses Directed Against Self
299
35 Lymphoproliferative Diseases
309
36 Transplantation Immunology
317
37 Tumor Immunology
329
38 Therapies That Manipulate Host Defense Mechanisms
341
39 Techniques to Detect and Quantify Host Defenses
353
40 The Future of Immunology
365
Index
373
Back Cover
381
Copyright

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About the author (2015)

Professor Edward J. Moticka, is a full professor Immunology and Microbiology at the A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine, Mesa, AZ.

He has taught immunology to medical and graduate student for more than 40 years. Currently he is responsible for all the immunology didactic teaching for first and second year medical students at the School of Osteopathic Medicine.

He has been a member of the American Association of Immunologists since 1976, and an Adjunct Professor in the Biodesign Institute and the School of Life Sciences at Arizona State University since 2005. In addition to teaching and research, Dr. Moticka is an expert in the area of research management including research compliance issues relating to human and animal subjects protection and technology transfer

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