Chemical Principles

Front Cover
Cengage Learning, Dec 3, 2007 - Science - 1200 pages
4 Reviews
Known for helping students develop the qualitative, conceptual foundation that gets them thinking like chemists, this market-leading text is designed for students with solid mathematical preparation and prior exposure to chemistry. The unique organization of the text supports this qualitative-to-quantitative approach. A strong emphasis on models and everyday applications of chemistry combines with a thoughtful, step-by-step problem solving approach to build conceptual understanding.
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This book is awful. It does a poor job of explaining concepts. The problems at the end of the chapters are sometimes missing vital information, necessary to solve the problem.

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The one page I needed was missing.

Contents

3
52
4
90
5
141
Chemical Equilibrium
196
Acids and Bases
233
8
286
9
358
2
404
14
660
Discussion Questions and Exercises
705
15
714
Discussion Questions and Exercises
761
16
777
17
846
18
876
The Representative Elements
885

Spontaneity Entropy and Free Energy
410
11
472
Quantum Mechanics and Atomic Theory
521
13
592
Bond Polarity and Dipole Moments
599
Formation of Binary Ionic Compounds
607
Covalent Bond Energies and Chemical Reactions
616
Discussion Questions and Exercises
651
Exercises
925
19
933
20
981
Organic and Biochemical Molecules
1013
Mathematical Procedures
1
Units of Measurement and Conversions Among Units
15
Equilibrium Constants and Reduction Potentials
24
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About the author (2007)

Steve Zumdahl is the author of market-leading textbooks in introductory chemistry, general chemistry, honors-level chemistry, and high school chemistry. Recently retired from his long-time position as Director of Undergraduate Programs at the University of Illinois, he has received numerous awards for his contributions to chemical education. These include the National Catalyst Award in recognition of his contribution to chemical education, the University of Illinois Teaching Award, the UIUC Liberal Arts and Sciences Advising Award, and the School of Chemical Sciences Teaching Award (five times). He earned his B.S. in Chemistry from Wheaton College (IL), and his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois.

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