A New History of Scotland: From the Earliest Accounts to the Present Time

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E. and C. Dilly, 1770 - Scotland - 294 pages
 

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Page 258 - ... to the subversion of the Protestant religion and violation of the laws and liberties of the nation, inverting all the ends of government; whereby he had forfaulted the right of the crown, and the throne was become vacant.
Page 173 - I willingly submit to that which Providence has decreed to be my lot ; " and laying her hand on a Bible, which happened to be near her, she...
Page 223 - I have more desired, than to see this day, wherein I hope, not only to settle these unhappy mistakings, but rightly to know, and be known of my native country. I need not tell you — for I think it is well known to most— what difficulties I have passed by and overcome, to be here at this time ; yet this I will say, that if love to my native country had not been a chief motive to this journey, other respects might easily have found a shift to do that by a commissioner, which I am come to perform...
Page 279 - England, and the lord chancellor of Scotland, they agreed to certain preliminary articles, importing, that all the proposals should be made in writing: and every point, when agreed, reduced to writing; that no points should be obligatory, till all matters should be adjusted in such a manner as would be proper to be laid before the queen and the two parliaments for their approbation : that a committee should be appointed from each commission, to revise the...
Page 280 - That all the subjects of the united kingdom of Great Britain shall from and after the union have full freedom and intercourse of trade and navigation to and from any port or place within the said united kingdom and the dominions and plantations thereunto belonging, and that there be a communication of all other rights, privileges and advantages which do or may belong to the subjects of either kingdom, except where it is otherwise expressly agreed in these articles.
Page 258 - The estates of the kingdom of Scotland find and declare, That king James VII. being a professed Papist, did assume the royal power, and act as a king, without ever taking the oath required by law; and had, by the advice of evil and wicked...
Page 223 - I do enjoy, after one hundred and eight descents, and which you have so often professed to maintain, and to which your own national oath doth oblige you, that I shall not think my pains ill bestowed.
Page 282 - ... shall be enacted by the Parliament of Great Britain to be raised in [that part of the United Kingdom now called] England on land and other things usually charged in Acts of Parliament there for granting an aid to the crown by a land tax [that part of the United Kingdom...
Page 283 - Britain, and should have rank and precedency next and immediately after the English peers of the like orders and degrees at the time of the union ; and before all peers of Great Britain of the like orders and degrees, who might be created after the union : That they...
Page 282 - Sum raifed in England, by any Tax on Land, and other Things ufually charged, together with the Land ; and that fuch Quota for Scotland, in the Cafes...

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