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General arrangements
State and local recreational agencies
State Highway Departments and County Boards of Commissioners
Fish and Wildlife Agencies
Forest Service
Procedures for leasing to Governmental agencies
Summary of licenses and leases

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Fees or charges now collected by the Corps of Engineers
Fees or charges now collected by others
Factors affecting possible fees or charges for use of

Federally provided facilities
Possible methods of collecting fees or user charges
Available studies of possibilities for fees or charges

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I PURPOSE

This report 18 submitted in response to the request by the

1 Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives in Report

No. 1634, 86th Congress, 2nd Session, for a complete report from both the Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation before the hearings on the 1962 Appropriations Bill, setting out in some detail just what facilities it is contemplated that the Federal Government will supply, how the leasing of land and concessions will be handled, and specific guidelines for transferring the management of reservoir areas to States and other local interests.

In discussing this matter in its report the Committee com

mented as follows:

"The problem of recreational facilities at water resources projects is increasing in magnitude es additional millions of Americans take advantage of the recreational opportunities at Federal projects throughout the country. The general policy which has been followed with respect to such facilities is that the Federal Government will supply the minimum requirements for public health and safety. Generally speaking, this has meant sanitary facilities, approach roads to the water areas, parking areas, and facilities for launching boats. However, the Committee notes in the justifications a growing tendency on the part of both the Corps and the Bureau of Reclamation to expand the definition of minimum facilities to the extent of supplying camping areas, trailer park areas, family picnic areas, and even such things as ski ramps for water skiing. The problem of managing recreational facilities is becoming an increasing burden in terms of manpower and money."

"There has been no general policy or uniform approach to the matter of concessions and land leasing in reservoir areas and the matter of parking fees, lees for the use of boat launching ramps and other facilities provided by the

Federal Government seems not to have been carefully thou zht
through by either the Corps or the Bureau of Reclamation.
While efforts to turn the development and management of
reservoir areas over to local political entities and states
have met with some success, there is again no uniform policy
concerning what the Federal Government will and will not do."

II RECREATIONAL USE OF WATER RESOURCES PROJECTS

Public recreational use of water resources projects planned and

constructed by the Federal Government presents one of the most difficult problems confronting the Federal agencies with responsibilities

in this field. At the same time proper management of the recreational

resource created by new water areas affords an opportunity for cooperation between all levels of government and private initiative in providing a needed public service.

Growth of the Problem. As the Committee has pointed out, the

problem is "increasing in magnitude as additional millions of

Americans take advantage of the recreational opportunities at Federal

projects throughout the country." Chart 1, herewith (Appendix I),

shows graphically the growth of public attendance at projects under

the jurisdiction of the Corps of Engineers, from about five million annually in 1946 to over 106 million in 1960. The magnitude of this public use and interest in itself would create a difficult administrative problem, but this has been aggravated by extremely rapid growth and by the fact that this was not, and probably could not have been, anticipated when the program was initiated in the early 1930's.

This growth has been particularly rapid during the past decade. During that period the acreage of lands and waters at reservoir

projects has doubled, but the number of visitors has increased

more than six times. The total recreational use of Corps of Engineers reservoirs has expanded from approximately 16 million visitors at 50 major projects in 1950 to more than 106 million visitors at

250 reservoirs in 1960.

This attendance has increased at the rate

of 10 million visitors each year for the past 3 years and is expected

to reach a total of at least 200 million visitors annually within the foreseeable future.

The 250 reservoirs of the Corps of Engineers now in operation

throughout the major river basins of the Nation provide approximately 3 million acres of water surface and 3 million acres of land along

nore than 21,000 miles of shorelines, mostly suitable for a wide

range of outdoor, water-related recreational use, and made available

to the public at over 4,000 improved access points. A summary of project data pertaining to recreational development and public ube of Civil Works projects of the Corps of Engineers as of 1959 18 included in Appendix I of this report.

Types of Use. The development and management of these new vater areas is also complicated by the variety in the types of public use for which a demand and need have developed. The Corps of Engineers has no detailed breakdown of the estimate of public use among the various types of recreation but on the basis of records &t a number of projects it is estimated that the great majority of

public use involves activities such as fishing, boating, swimming,

Federal Government seems not to have been carefully thought through by either the Corps or the Bureau of Reclamation. While efforts to turn the development and management of reservoir areas over to local political entities and states have met with some success, there is again no uniform policy concerning what the Federal Government will and will not do." II RECREATIONAL USE OF WATER RESOURCES PROJECTS Public recreational use of water resources projects planned and constructed by the Federal Government presents one of the most difficult problems confronting the Federal agencies with responsibilities in this field. At the same time proper management of the recreational resource created by new water areas affords an opportunity for cooperation between all levels of government and private initiative in providing a needed public service. Growth of the Problem. As the Committee has pointed out, the problem is "increasing in magnitude as additional millions of Americans take advantage of the recreational opportunities at Federal projects throughout the country." Chart l, herewith (Appendix I), shows graphically the growth of public attendance at projects under the jurisdiction of the Corps of Engineers, from about five million annually in 1916 to over 106 million in 1960. The magnitude of this public use and interest in itself would create a difficult administrative problem, but this has been aggravated by extremely rapid growth and by the fact that this was not, and probably could not have been, anticipated when the program was initiated in the early 1930's. This growth has been particularly rapid during the past decade.

During that period the acreage of lands and waters at reservoir

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