The Quarterly Review, Volume 31

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John Murray, 1825
 

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Page 269 - And say besides, that in Aleppo once, Where a malignant and a turban'd Turk Beat a Venetian and traduced the state, I took by the throat the circumcised dog And smote him, thus.
Page 113 - Even the mystery which hath been hid from ages and from generations, but now is made manifest to his saints: To whom God would make known what is the riches of the glory of this mystery among the Gentiles; which is Christ in you, the hope of glory...
Page 289 - Piety displays Her mouldering roll, the piercing eye explores New manners, and the pomp of elder days, Whence culls the pensive bard his pictured stores. Nor rough nor barren are the winding ways Of hoar antiquity, but strown with flowers.
Page 99 - Were you a warrior, you would show it by your firmness, and not cry and whimper like an old woman. You know, bear, that our tribes are at war with each other, and that yours was the aggressor. You have found the Indians too powerful for you, and you have gone sneaking about in the woods, stealing their hogs ; perhaps at this time you have hog's flesh in your belly.
Page 480 - The other is a little, old, gray-muzzled curmudgeon, with an unhappy eye, that kindles like a coal if you only look at him ; his nose turns up ; his mouth is drawn into wrinkles, so as to show his teeth ; in short, he has altogether the look of a dog far gone in misanthropy, and totally sick of the world. When he walks, he has his tail curled up so tight that it seems to lift his feet from the ground ; and he seldom makes use of more than three legs at a time, keeping the other drawn up as a reserve....
Page 243 - God's blessing, he will become learned in every thing relating to his religion in such a degree, that he will not be liable to be misled, either by the refined arguments, or by the false assertions of those who endeavour to engraft their own opinion upon the oracles of God.
Page 284 - It seems to be a kind of duty incumbent on those who devote themselves to poetry, to raise, if possible, the dignity of a declining art, by making it as beneficial to life and manners as the limits of composition, and the character of modern times will allow.
Page 98 - Squaw in the face — see him smile — which is all one he say, Yes! so he take him home — no danger he be cross! no! no ! Squaw know too well what Indian do if he cross! — throw him away and take another ! Squaw love to eat meat ! no husband ! no meat ! Squaw do every thing to please husband ! he do the same to please Squaw ! live happy ! " 1 The pronouns in the Indian language have no feminine gender.
Page 113 - Nevertheless, I tell you the truth, it is expedient for you that I go away ; for if I go not away, the Comforter will not come unto you ; but if I depart, I will send him unto you. And when he is come, he will reprove the world of sin, of righteousness, and of judgment.
Page 196 - FADING, still fading, the last beam is shining, Father in heaven ! the day is declining, Safety and innocence fly with the light, Temptation and danger walk forth with the night; From the fall of the shade till the morning bells chime, Shield me from danger, save me from crime.

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