Museum Criticum: Or, Cambridge Classical Researches

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James Henry Monk, Charles James Blomfield
J. Murray, 1826 - Classical philology
 

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Page 604 - As still are wont t' annoy the walled town, Might there be heard : but careless Quiet lies Wrapt in eternal silence far from enemies...
Page 161 - Busirite nome, a city which had been seized and fortified against a siege, by great depots of arms and every other kind of munitions, the spirit of revolt having strengthened itself there for a long time, among the impious who are assembled in it, had done much mischief to the temples and inhabitants of Egypt ; and having laid siege to this place, he surrounded it with entrenchments, ditches, and strong walls. The Nile having made a great flood in the eighth year, and as it usually does, inundating...
Page 114 - ... ceremonious delicacy introduced which has taught men to abuse each other with the utmost politeness, and express the most indecent ideas in the most modest language. The ancients had little of this. They were accustomed to call a spade a spade ; to give, every thing its proper name. There is another sort of indecency which is infinitely more dangerous, which corrupts the heart without offending the ear.
Page 172 - AOo years which lapsed between the date of the (Rosetta) inscription and that of the oldest books extant, the language appears to have changed much more than those of Greece and Italy have in 2,000. That is, that during the interval of this 500 years, literal language had been introduced and adopted, instead of the picture and symbol they had used before.
Page 517 - Norwich], then an undergraduate, defended in the schools a question taken from the philosophy of Newton : a step which must have had the approbation of the moderator who presided at the disputations: and his translation of Rohault with references to the Principia was first published in 1697 ; and not in 1718 as Professor Playfair has strangely supposed.
Page 114 - ... never dresses up the most detestable vices in an amiable light ; but generally, by describing them in their native colours, makes the reader disgusted with them. His abuse of the most eminent citizens may be accounted for upon similar principles. Besides, in a Republic, freedom of speech was deemed an essential privilege of a citizen. Demosthenes treats his adversaries with such language as would, in our days, be reckoned scurrilous enough ; but it passed, in those days, without any notice or...
Page 114 - Aristophanes's indecency there is nothing that can allure, but much that must deter. He never dresses up the most detestable vices in an amiable light ; but generally, by describing them in their native colours, makes the reader disgusted with them. His abuse of the most eminent citizens may be accounted for upon similar principles. Besides, in a republic freedom of speech was reckoned an essential privilege of a citizen.
Page 114 - ... reckoned scurrilous enough ; but it passed, in those days, without any notice or reprehension. The world is since greatly altered for the better. We have, indeed, retained the matter, but judiciously 'rejected what was offensive in the manner. In his* plots too, it must be owned, Aristophanes is sometimes faulty. It ought however to be observed, that his contemporary comic poets did not pique themselves upon the artful management of the plot. Aristophanes has therefore the usual failing of dramatic...
Page 202 - Egyptian inscription, which ex" pressed the words God, Immortal, Vulcan, Priests, " Diadem, Thirty, and some others, had a striking " resemblance to the corresponding hieroglyphics; and " since none of these characters could be reconciled, " without inconceivable violence to the forms of any " imaginable alphabet, I could scarcely...
Page 166 - ... be asp bearing diadems, as on the other shrines : there shall be placed in the midst of them the ornament which the king wore upon his entry into the temple at Memphis, when he celebrated the rites of the assumption of the lawful power from his father, the crown Pschent, which ornament he then wore : and there shall be upon 27 the golden ornaments the quadrangle of the everliving, and on it shall be placed with the asp bearing diadems, ample golden phylacteries, projecting over the golden shrine...

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