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lief to the poor. In view of the policy of making the institution, as far as may be, a self-supporting one, it is suggested that more room is required, and, if possible, a larger building, so that arrangements may be made to separate the private from the public wards. The amount now paid for rent would discharge a large part of the interest on the principal required for the ground and a new building. This could be adapted more completely and economically to the wants of the community, and the growing popularity of the hospital justifies us in the belief that it might be made very soon a self-supporting institution. The rapid increase of our population, its peculiar character, that of a metropolis, and the fact that this institution has supplied' a most pressing want in our midst, justify us in the belief expressed.

J. K. BARNES, M. D.
JOSHUA RILEY, M. D.
GRAFTON TYLER, M. D.
THOMAS MILLER, M. D.
N. YOUNG, M. D.
F. HOWARD, M. D.

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RECAPITULATION OF APPROPRIATIONS REQUIRED FOR THE FOREGOING WORKS. United States Capitol extension......

....... $125, 000 00 Annual repairs United States Capitol. ..................... 15, 000 00 Heating the rotundo, the old hall of representatives, and the offices and stairways connected therewith ....

15, 000 00 New dome of United States Capitol...............

5,000 00 Extension United States Capitol grounds......

100, 000 00 North front United States Patent Office building..

20, 000 00 For deficiencies : Annual repairs United States Capitol. ..........

5, 281 75 Enlargement Congressional Library........

5, 922 46 I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDWARD CLARK,

Architect United States Capitol Extension. Hon. O. H. Browning,

Secretary of the Interior.

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November 1, 1867. Sir: In accordance with the act of Congress of February 29, 1864, requiring the warden of the jail to make an annual report to the Secretary of the Interior, I have the honor to submit the following:

I succeeded the late incumbent; Mr. T. B, Brown, on the 26th day of July last, and, therefore, the present report is prepared only in part from my per·sonal knowledge.

The jail has been crowded, repeatedly, since I have had charge, and owing to its insecure condition, and the desperate character of many of the inmates, the fact that not a single escape has yet occurred reflects great credit on the vigilance and discipline of the guards, to whose efficiency I take great pleasure in testifying. But as it is unreasonable to suppose that even the constant watchfulness of a few men can be made to supply the defects of an insecure and incommodious building, it is earnestly to be hoped that the erection of the new jail may not be much longer delayed.

A number of watch-spring saws and several files were by some means placed in the possession of certain prisoners committed on charges of burglary, horsestealing and the like offences, by means of which a great number of the irons (in which it had been found necessary to place them after former unsuccessful attempts to break out) were rendered totally useless. The prisoners assert that these tools were brought into the jail by Mrs. Conover, alias Dunham, while she was permitted to visit her husband in his cell; a practice I never felt myself at liberty to allow.

It is believed that all these implements have been recovered from the prisoners, but, in order to secure against any future attempts, I had (with the approval of the acting Secretary of the Interior) a number of case-hardened irons made at the United States navy yard. These, although more expensive at first cost than the common ones, (costing about $240 in all,) will, it is believed, be cheaper in the end, and will, undoubtedly, answer the purpose for which they were obtained, and which the others had failed to do.

When I assumed charge the jail and out buildings were in a decidedly rickety condition. The furnaces required re-bottoming, the windows re-glazing, and the roofs and floors of the stable and storehouses were also out of repair. I have only made such repairs as were absolutely necessary to secure the health and comfort of the inmates and insure the preservation of the premises, but even these have been attended with considerable expense.

The first item of the expenditures, to be referred to hereafter, includes the cost of a large stock of fuel, bedding, clothing, &c., yet on hand, sufficient, I think, to last the greater portion of the ensuing year. The clothing account has necessarily been large in consequence of court not having been in session for so long a period, thereby keeping the prisoners on my hands for such a length of time that the clothing brought with them was worn out, and I compelled to furnish them with new.

The following is the number of commitments for the year, the character of the offences, &c. :

THE NUMBER OF COMMITMENTS FOR THE YEAR.

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For murder ......
For assault with intent to kill ..
For assault and battery .....
For robbery
For burglary ..
For attempt at rape ...
For rape ............
For larceny ..........
For horse-stealing ....
For passing counterfeit money
For forgery ..........
For picking pockets......
For keeping bawdy-houses ..
For security to keep the peace
For fraud .............
For malicious mischief ........
For witnesses ....
For obtaining money and goods under false pretences
For threats ..
For arson ......
For trespass ......
For rioting ..........
For receiving stolen goods .
For keeping gambling-house
For contempt of court.
For resisting officers ...
For infanticide .........
For selling liquor without license
For fugitives from justice .
For sodomy ..............
For illegal voting ........
For adultery ......
For selling and giving liquor to soldiers .......
Daily average number of prisoners during the year
Number of prisoners sent to Albany .........
Number of prisoners sentenced to jail ...

No deaths nor cases of insanity.

The number at present confined in the prison is 113.
Of this number, white men .....
White females ....
Colored men .......
Colored females ....
White boys........
Colored boys .......

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The expenses of the jail for the year ending October 31, 1867, are as follows: For subsistence of prisoners, repairs on buildings, fuel, bedding,

clothing, &c., and transportation of prisoners to Albany ..... $14, 924 89 For medicines .....................

144 81 Pay of officers and laborers of the jail .................. 15, 666 78

...

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The report of the physician is herewith submitted.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. HUESTIS, Warden. Hon. 0. H. BROWNING,

Secretary of the Interior.

WASHINGTON, D. C., November 1, 1867. Sir: Since my last report of November 1, 1866, I am happy to report that we have had no further epidemic at the jail, and it will be seen that the difference in the number of fever cases is very great. Last year it was one hundred and two; this year the number is sixty, which goes to prove my theory of the cause of the same by scraping the walls of the old whitewash, of over one-half inch thick, thus liberating a poisorfous aeriform matter which was absorbed in the system and gave rise to the endemic of typhus fever.

This year there has been no scraping of the walls, and there has been no visi. tation of such an epidemic.

It is remarkable, though the jail has been more crowded than usual, there has not been one death in the establishment during the year.

The following is the average number of diseases treated at the jail since No. vember 1, 1866 : Diarrhea and dysentery. Small-pox..... Venereal .. Mania a potu.. Fever ..

60 Miscellaneous ...... Deaths ..........

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200

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Total............

......... 394

There have been several violent cases of pneumonia, but the health ofthe jail is very good at present, there being but few cases of slight sickness.

W. J. D. DUHAMEL,

Physician U. S. Jail. W. W. HUESTIS,

Warden United States Jail.

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