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37 78 178 262

Number of pavements out of repair, &c

improper drains
persons throwing slops and garbage in streets.
persons throwing rubbish, &c., in streets...
houses without privies
obstructions to streets and alleys
unlawful privies ....
streets and bridges unsafe ....

39 59

48 13

Total

3, 425

Number of nuisances abated during the year...

nuisances abated by order of the department.
nuisances abated on verbal notice by officers.
nuisances unabated

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169

37

Those nuisances abated by order of the department may be classified as follows, viz: Number of filthy and leaky privies.

1,237 filthy yards...

159 cellars with standing and stagnant water. sewers in filthy condition..

10 cellars in filthy condition.

20 stables in filthy condition slaughter-houses in filthy condition

20 hog pens in filthy condition

78 lots in filthy condition...

69 gutters in filthy condition

91 houses in filthy condition.

18 alleys in filthy condition

381 lots below grade..

.60 pools of stagnant water .

167 hydrants and street washers leaky, &c.

71 buildings in unsafe condition

49 sheds in unsafe condition..

10 chimneys in unsafe condition

22 pavements out of repair.

35 improper drains ...

76 persons throwing garbage, &c., in streets

178 persons throwing rubbish, &c., in streets.

262 houses without privies.

38 obstructions to streets and alleys

59 unlawful privies ..

48 streets and bridges unsafe.

10

Total

3, 374

Statistical record of slaughter-houses for the year ending September 30, 1867.

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Return of bone and fat boiling establishments, and hide and tallow ware

houses, fc.

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Miscellaneous duty performed, 8c., by the sanitary company during the year. Amount of fines imposed (for violations of corporation orders)....... $964 37

Number of sick and destitute persons sent to hospital.

friendless persons buried ...
lost children restored to parents, &c
Edead horses, cows, &c., reported and removed
dead hogs, dogs, &c., reported and removed.

26 ..30

5 861 786

Property Rooms, No. 2 Lorisiana Avenue,

Washington, October, 1867. Sir: Agreeably to the direction of the Board of Police at its last session, I have the honor to submit a report of the business of this office for the year ending the 30th ultimo.

The property (including money) received at this office from all sources has been estimated at the value of twelve thousand eight bundred and ninety-nine dollars and eighty-five cents, ($12,899 85,) of which the sum of four thousand eight hundred and thirty-two dollars and ninety cents was returned from the detective branch of the service. During the same time the amount of thirteen thousand two hundred and forty dollars and eighty cents ($13,240 80) has been delivered to owners pursuant to the provisions of law, of which four thousand one hundred and seventy-two dollars and fifty-three cents ($4,172 53) was from returns by detectives. On July 1st a sale of unclaimed property was made, amounting to the sum of five hundred and sixty dollars and twenty-nine cents, ($560 29,) the expenses of which were sixty-eight dollars and twenty-six cents, leaving the net sum of four hundred and ninety-two dollars and ihree cents, ($492 03,) which was duly turned over to the treasurer for the policemen’s fund. The lieutenants of police have made weekly returns to this office of property and money taken into custody by the police force, including the detectives, to whom delivered, and by what authority. It is found from an analysis that tite amount thus reported as delivered to owners and others than this office during the year ending the 30th ultimo, is two hundred and twenty-seven thousand eight hundred and seventy-eight dollars and thirty-five cente, ($229,878 35) Enclosed is respectfully submitted a detailed tabular statement showing the receipts and deliveries during each month of the year referred to. Also, as interesting in connection with the property operations of the department, I submit a statement prepared from the weekly returns showing the amount returned as the monthly receipts and deliveries at the several stations for the year just closed. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. R. HERRICK,

Property Clerk. Dr. Chas. H. NICHOLS,

President Board of Police.

Tabular statement of property and money received at the office of the property clerk, and delivered therefrom during the year ending September 30, 1867. When received from precincts :

Precinct returns delivered to owners : October, 1866. $1,028 53 October, 1866....

$1,937 92 November, 1866. 342 70 November, 1866.

389 70 December, 1866. 378 53 December, 1866.

1, 022 00 January, 1867.

1,510 79
January, 1867.

412 18 February, 1867 398 85 February, 1867

1,412 69 March, 1867. 563 80 March, 1867.

506 63 April, 1867.

146 93
April, 1867..

623 90 May, 1867. 873 86 May, 1867..

514 98 Juve, 1867. 477 84 June, 1867

351 00 July, 1867. 844 87 | July, 1867..

835 27 August, 1867. 626 20 August, 1867

200 00 September, 1867 874 05 September, 1867

862 00 Total....

8,066 95
Total......

9,068 27 When received from 'detective office: Detective office returns delivered: October, 1866 353 50 October, 1866.

776 00 November, 1866 1,000 00 November, 1866.

1,008 00 December, 1866. 190 50 December, 1866.

181'00 January, 1867 440 87 January, 1867.

213 75 February, 1867 454 00 February, 1867

420 50 March, 1867. 514 00 March, 1867.

200 00 April, 1867. 633 53 April, 1867

757 53 May, 1867. 555 00 May, 1867.

100 00 June, 1867 114 50 June, 1867

51 00 July, 1867. 221 00 July, 1867

70 00 August, 1867

345 50
August, 1867.

20 00 September, 1867 10 50 September, 1867

374 75 Total...

4,832 90
Total.....

4,172 53 8,066 95

9,068 27 Total receipts ...

12,899 85
Total receipts

13, 240 80

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Return of property and money coming into the possession of the Metropolitan

Police, and delivered to owners or others.

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1866, October $339 68 $2,186 8! $112 8963, 871 87$2, 143 99 $110, 975 37 $672 60 $442 90 $220 00 $120,966 11 November 770 00 I, 854 85 325 0 1,198 38 3,364 61 1, 869 07 828 32 199 87] 1,285 00 10,995 08 December 236 001 1,640 75 421 65 3,338 34 4,788 54 3, 290 99 308 95/1, 476 43 846 00

16, 367 65 1867. January 375 00 430 28 307 00 2,069 03 2, 156 58 2, 152 65

235 25 295 52 1,530 98 9,552 29 February

536 7 30 00 1,318 08 2, 6-29 29 1,712 50 322 24 132 00 1,202 98 7,883 57 Murch.

852 5:31, 680 53 374 211 3,372 55 1,940 290 167 79 57 71 1,606 02 10,051 66 April.. 5 000 203 631 25 00 727 72 1,517 93

3, 144 650 574 43 342 62 1, 122 90 7, 663 88 May.. 77 501 343 13 4: 35 405 57 1, 202 14

1, 150 401

487 64 598 06 3,918 67 8, 227 46 June

162 50 724 65 3:37 701, 36: 30 1,021 00 812 91 135 35 181 77 147 25 4,914 43 Joly.. 430 00 1,927 41 221 00 3 254 38 2,243 17 6, 808 89 735 08 363 681 286 01

16, 289 42 August 30 50 2,952 64 5 00 1,316 64 1, 263 43 1, 283 90 274 10 3:25 011 583 98 8,035 23 Septeinber 420 00 1,205 5:3 193 87 561 341 1,266 72

1, 170 93 486 48 7:38 001 885 00 6,931 27 Total... 2, 866 1814, 878 774, 703 99|19, 799 8926, 969 95 136, 342 555, 228 635, 453 60/13, 634 79 227, 878 35

462

officers. A very large portion of their labor makes no show upon the records. These men are frequently required to watch suspected parties or known thieves and criminals for days and weeks, with no results of which a computation can be made. Patience, industry, shrewdness, and tact must be brought into constant exercise by the successful detective. It is believed that the work which the detective officers connected with this department have been called upon to perform has been well done, and to the satisfaction of the public.

The following is taken from the records of the detective office, viz: Number of robberies reported during the year...

576 Number of arrests made durir.g the year ........ Amount of property lost or stolen..............

$58,504 46 Amount of property recovered ........

15,691 40 Amount of property turned over to property clerk.......

4,068 32 Amount of property turned over to owners.......

11,623 08 Amount of property taken from prisoners and returned to the same 3,599 75

Of the above amount of property reported lost or stolen, $2,136 have been recovered by precinct officers, and $1.737 by the owners.

Experience teaches that persons who report robberies usually claim that their loss is two or three times its real value. This remark will account, in a great measure, for the difference in the amounts reported lost or stolen and the amounts recovered.

MAGISTRATES' (OCRTS.

This board cannot but again urge in the strongest possible manner the neces. sity of a thorough reorganization of the petty courts of this District. In several instances persons hold commissions as justices of the peace and undertake to discharge the duties incident to that office who are entirely unfitted for these positions, not only in character and intelligence, but in their personal habits and deportment.

By the eighth section of an act of Congress approved February 22, 1867, entitled “ An act to regulate proceedings before justices of the peace in the District of Columbia, and for other purposes," any justice of the peace is entitled to issue a special warrant returnable before himself for an assault, an assault and battery, or an affray, and upon a hearing of the charge can impose a fine and costs. The practical working of this law shows that warrants are issued and parties arrested on the most trivial charges, and the arrested party mulcted in a fine and costs on testimony which would not be entertained for a moment were not the justice under the law allowed to retain costs. Instances are reported where oppressive fines and costs bave been imposed upon poor and

only costs are imposed and the charge against the accused dismissed. Nor is any bond required of the justice compelling him to account for fines imposed to the treasurer of this board, as is demanded of magistrates selected by this board. Moreover, a person who commits an assault or an assault and battery upon another can, under this law, go before a magistrate and plead guilty to the charge and only a fine can be imposed, which must be collected as a civil debt.

It will be readily seen that this being so, an irresponsible person, without property, can go about our streets assaulting whom he pleases, and no punishment can be inflicted because under this law the fine becomes a civil debt and the accused has do property upon which a levy can be made for the amount of the fiue.

The board would earnestly suggest that to secure a proper administration of justice this law should be speedily amended in these particulars.

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