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D.--Statement of expenditures for salaries for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1867.

Amount.

Remarks.

16

June 30 $3,000 00
1,330 July 1 August

29 216 85 Back pay for 1860.
2, 000 July 1 June 302, 000 00
October 5 October

48 91
1,500 February 13 February 27 62 50
1,500 | November 12 November 17 24 45
1,500 December 8 December 26 77 44
1,500 April 2 June

370 87
5,801 02

30

Time employed.

Name.

Duty.

Rate of
salary.

From-
inclusive

To-
inclusive-

John A. Clark
David J. Miller
David J. Miller
Robert B. Willison
Robert B. Willison
Thomas A. Smith.
Isaac C. Stuck..
Isaac C. Stuck

Surveyor general
Clerk
Translator
Draughtsman

..do..
.do..

do.
.do.

1,500

$3,000 July

SURVEYOR GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Santa Fe, New Mexico, July 19, 1867.

JOHN A. CLARK, Surveyor General.

E--Statement showing the incidental expenditures during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1867.

Remarks

Do.

$74 60 Per vouchers accompanying account.
15 00
44 00
66 00
241 45

do.
105 37
Do.

do.
66 00
66 00
56 61

do.

Do.

JOHN A. CLARK, Surveyor General.

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Time.

Fiscal quarter.

Name.

Consideration.

Amount.

From-
inclusive-

To-
inclusive-

July
August
October

1 July 31
1 September 30
1 | December 31

First
First
First
Second
Second
Third
Third
Fourth
Fourth

John A. Clark
Mary Vincent

.do.

..do.
John A. Clark

..do.
Mary Vincent

.do.
John A. Clark

Sundries
Office rent

.do.

.do.
Sundries

..do..
Office rent

.do...
Sundries

January
April

1 March
1 June

31
30

735 03

SURVEYOR GENERAL'S OFFICE, Santa Fe, New Mexico, July 19, 1867.

F-Estimate of appropriations required for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1869.

Object of appropriation.

For salary of the surveyor general.
For salary of the translator........
For public surveys-continning the survey of base, meridian, township, and subdivision lines

SURVEYOR GENERAL'S OFFICE, Santa , New Mexico, July 19, 1867.

JOHN A. CLARK, Surveyor General,

No. 18 F.

SurveyoR GENERAL's Office,

Denver, Colorado Territory, July 10, 1867. Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of the official transactions of this office for the year ending June 30, 1867, together with an estimate for surveys for the year ending June 30, 1869, and such other information as, in the short time I have held the position of surveyor general of Colorado and Utah, has come under my notice.

Statement marked A shows the surveys made during the year ending June 30, 1867.

Statement marked B contains the surveys made under the 10th section of the act of May 30, 1862.

Statement marked C contains the surveys now under contract and in progress under the appropriation for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1868.

Statement marked D contains the amount of salaries paid the surveyor general and clerks for the year ending June 30, 1867, and incidental expenses of the office for the same period.

Statement marked E contains the number of townships surveyed during the year ending June 30, 1867, and area of public land contained in the same.

Estimates for surveys for the year ending June 30, 1867. Estimate for surveys in mountains : 398 miles of standard lines, at $25 per mile..... $9, 950 00 844 miles of township lines, at $20 per mile ..... 16, 880 00 1,200 miles of subdivisional lines, at $18 per mile .. 21, 600 00 Total for surveys in mountains

$47, 630 00 Estimate for surveys on plains : 624 miles of standard lines, at $10 per mile...... 6, 240 00 1,398 miles of township lines, at $8 per mile.. 11, 184 00 3,000 miles of subdivisional lines, at $7 per mile.... 21,000 00

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COLORADO.

The amount of the above estimates will appear large, but they are called for by the rapid completion of two lines of railroads, one of which is now running to a point in this Territory

In relation to the surveys in the mountains the price allowed by law per mile is entirely inadequate to have the work done in a country so broken and mountainous, and presenting so many difficulties to be overcome by the surveyor as this. The price of the standard lines in the mountains should be at least twentyfive dollars per mile; exterior township lines twenty, and subdivisional lines eighteen, dollars per mile. This would be only sufficient to have the work completed in a proper manner.

I cannot too strongly urge the necessity of having the surveys extended over the mountains to the parks and mining claims, to enable the mining claims to be properly located. The timber lands in the mountains should be subdivided, as they are being rapidly depleted of their timber for the mines and building purposes. They could be readily sold, while, if depleted of their timber, they would be of little or no value.

During the year ending June 30, 1869, it will be found necessary to extend the surveys along the line of the Union Pacific railroad, eastern division, and that alone will require an increased appropriation to enable the work to be done. The Union Pacific railroad is now completed and in running order to Julesburg, in this Territory, one hundred and eighty miles northeast of Denver, which point they expect to reach during the summer of 1868.

The Union Pacific railroad, eastern division, is completed and in running order to Fort Ellsworth, about three hundred miles east of Denver, which point they also expect to reach during July, 1868.

This will give to this Territory two routes eastward, and will open the country and induce immigration to the fine lands of Colorado.

Gold and silver.-Of the gold and silver one can form no idea of the wealth of the deposits in this Territory, and as soon as a method of separating the different metals in a less expensive manner is adopted, large results will follow.

I have had too little time to make a full report on this important subject. But my predecessor in his last able report has entered so fully into the subject, that I have nothing to add.

The mines have not fully recovered from the effects of the late depression, owing in a great measure to reckless speculation. But I am convinced that when fully developed the mines of Colorado will be found second to none in riches.

Coal.-Coal exists in large quantities and has been traced and opened along the base of the mountains, and the indications are that an extensive basin exists underlying a large extent of territory eastward from the mountains. The quality is good. It makes an excellent gas and steam coal, and some of it could be used for smelting iron.

I consider the coal deposits one invaluable to this country, and time will so prove it.

Iron.--Iron is found in abundance along the base of the mountains and at some distance from them, and with abundance of coal found near to it, will prove in time invaluable. As yet no effort has been made to any extent to work it, owing to the high price of labor.

GENERAL REMARKS ON THE AGRICULTURE OF THE COUNTRY.

My predecessor in his last report estimated the number of acres of land capa. ble of cultivation in the Territory at 4,000,000 of acres. It is a fact that all the land that can be irrigated is susceptible of cultivation and produces well.

The mountain streams fall very rapidly, and thus can be carried by irrigating ditches to cover immense quantities of land, and I am led to believe that at least 10,000,000 of acres of land can be cultivated. The crops last year were good. It was the first year, I am told, that sufficient produce had been raised to supply the demands of the Territory. The present year farming is being carried on with success, the grasshoppers, the great dread of the farmer, having done but little damage to the crops. Wheat, oats, barley, corn, potatoes, &c., all look well and promise an abundant yield, and I predict that it will be but a few years until this Territory will produce more than enough to supply her wants.

UTAH. No appropriation for surveys in this Territory was made by Congress for the year ending June 30, 1867. This Territory is being rapidly settled, and I deem it to be the best interest of the government to have the land surveyed and a land office established in the Territory, as a large amount of land is under cultivation and settlers are anxious to obtain title to the lands. It would also encourage immigration, which is the best method of doing away with the peculiar institutions of the country. The rapid settlement of the country should urge the necessity of making an appropriation for surveys in this Territory.

My predecessor, in his last annual report for the year ending June 30, 1866, recommended a small appropriation for retracing the lines of public survey. I would also recommend an appropriation of five thousand dollars to have the lines retraced and to enable the surveyor general to superintend it in person, and also an appropriation of twenty thousand dollars for surveys in this Territory.

The northern and eastern boundary line of the Territory of Colorado should be established by survey, as it is difficult to determine what portion of the lands along the line of the Union Pacific railroad are in this Territory.

Hoping this may meet with your approval, I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. H. LESSIG,

Surveyor General Colorado and Ulah. Hon. Joseph S. Wilson,

Commissioner of the General Land Office, Washington, D. C.

A.-Statement of surveys made under the appropriation for the fiscal year

ending June 30, 1867.

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54 162

39 660 583 542 93 96 125 419

54 599

25

.......... Standard lines.

Exterior township lines.

Do.
| 4,943 65 Subdivisional.
69 4,085 70 Do.
| 3,800 29

Do.
767 50 | Exterior township lines.

960 14 Standard lines 1,006 Exterior township lines. 2,936 15 Subdivisional.

436 17 | Exterior township lines. 4, 194 96 Subdivisional.

181 88 Do.

32 George E. Pierce .... 33 George E. Pierce......

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