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WILLIAM TRIPP, Surveyor General. SURVEYOR GENERAL'S OFFICE, Yankton, D. T., August 19, 1867.

No. 18 C,

Surveyor General's Office,

Plattsmouth, Nebraska, August 27, 1867. Sir: Complying with your instructions, I have the honor to submit my report of the organization and official action, thus'far, of this office.

In obedience to the provisions of an act of Congress entitled “ An act to remove the office of surveyor general of Wisconsin and Iowa to Plattsmouth, Nebraska,” and in accordance with your instructions of April last, I proceeded, after having secured a building at Plattemouth suitable for office purposes, to Dubuque, lowa, and there obtained, from the custodian of the surveying archives of the State of Iowa, such furniture belonging to the office of the late surveyor general of Wisconsin and Iowa as I deemed advisable and necessary to transport to this place for the use of this office.

As soon as the plats, field-notes, records, and other papers connected with the surveys in Nebraska, on file in the office of the surveyor general at Leavenworth, Kansas, were separated from those of Kansas, and the necessary copies prepared, I brought them also to this place, and, when properly arranged, notice was given, as directed by you, that the surveyor general's office for the district of lowa and Nebraska was open and ready for business.

All surveys in Nebraska contracted for by the surveyor general of Kansas and Nebraska have been completed in the field and office; and transcripts of the field-notes, plats, diagrams, and descriptive lists have been transmitted to the proper offices.

l'he Indian troubles, which for a long time past have disturbed the peace of

our frontier country, increased to such an extent at the opening of this season that it soon became evident that no surveys could safely be prosecuted in the field in this district without the protection of a military escort. I therefore, in June last, made formal application to General Augur, commanding this department, for such protection. This, I regret to say, he was unable to give me until about the first of August, and then only to the extent of forty men-sufficient, as was thought, for three surveying parties.

I have contracted for the extension of the following standard lines, viz: the second guide meridian west, from the third standard parallel north to the fourth standard parallel north; the third, fourth, and fifth guide meridians west, from the second standard parallel north to the fourth standard parallel north; the second standard parallel north, through ranges twenty-five to forty, inclusive; third standard parallel north, through ranges seventeen to forty, inclusive; and the fourth standard parallel north, through ranges nine to forty, inclusive, all west of the sixth principal meridian.

I have also under contract, and being subdivided, townships five and six of ranges twelve, thirteen, fourteen, fifteen, and sixteen; townships five, six, seven, and eight of ranges seventeen and eighteen; township eight of range nineteen; and fractional townships eight, of ranges fifteen and sixteen, all west of the sixth principal meridian.

Other deputy surveyors are ready to take the field if proper escorts can be obtained. These General Augur has kindly promised me at the earliest possible moment; but the lateness of the season, combined with the fact that the Indian attacks seem increasing in number and ferocity, forbid the hope that more than one other party can be maintained in the field at present. I am reconciled to this fact by the belief that a speedy adjustment and settlement of the Indian question seems probable.

It is hoped that the Indian commission, now on the frontier and making the final effort for a peaceful solution, will succeed. If they fail, the military power of the nation will, doubtless, at once be evoked, the savage obstacles to American progress be thrust aside or destroyed, and civilization, having gathered momentum from the delay, will once more resume its peaceful march across the continent.

In the further extension of the surveys, that of first importance is the estab. lishment of the western boundary of this State, and so much of the southern as forms the northern boundary of Colorado. Settlements of considerable importance and thriving towns have sprung up with great rapidity along portions of this line, which is also near the line of the Union Pacific railroad. In many instances it is impossible, without this survey, to determine whether these towns are within the limits of the State of Nebraska or the Territory of Colorado; hence civil organizations, and the establishment of law and order, are delayed.

The wonderfully rapid progress of the Union Pacific railroad, now stretching across the State from east to west, also demands increased and increasing energy in the extension of the public surveys along its line. The cabin of the pioneer farmer and the shop of the pioneer tradesman are already thickly scattered alongits route, and the interests of the settlers, the railroad, and the country alike demand the speedy survey of the lands adjacent.

The usual statements and estimates accompanying this report are as follows:

A.-Schedule showing the condition of the surveys under the appropriation for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1868.

B.-Statement showing the salary and incidental expense account for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1868.

C.—Estimates of sums required for the extension of surveys in the State of Nebraska for fiscal year ending June 30, 1869.

D.-Estimates of sums required for office expenses for fiscal year ending June 30, 1869. All of which is respectfully submitted:

P. W. HITCHCOCK,

Surveyor General.

A.-Schedule showing the condition of the surveys under the appropriation for the

fiscal year ending June 30, 1868.

Name of deputy.

Date of con

tract.

Character

of the work.

Amount and locality.

Present condition

Josiah B. Park and July 2, 1867 Standard The 2d guide meridian west, Parties in Henry C. Campbell.

lines. from 3d to 4th standard par- the field.

allels north; the 3d, 4th, and 5th guide meridians west, from 2d to 4th standard parallels north, all west of 6th principal meridian ; the 2d standard parallel north through ranges 25 to 40 inclusive west of the 6th principal meridian ; the 3d standard parallel north through ranges 17 to 40 inclusive, west of the 6th principal meridian, and the 4th standard parallel north through ranges 9 to 40 inclusive, west of the 6th principal me

ridian, Nebraska. William Hardin ..... July 12, 1867. Subdivi. Townships 5 and 6 north, Parties in

sions. ranges 12, 13, 14, 15, and the field.

16 west, of the 6th principal

meridian, Nebraska. James McBride...... July 31, 1867.) Subdivi- | | Townships 5, 6, 7, and 8 Parties in

sions and north, ranges 17 and 18 the field,
township west, of the 6th principal
line. meridian ; township 8 north,

range 19 west, of the 6th
principal meridian; and frac-
tional township 8 north,
ranges 15 and 16 west, of
the 6th principal meri-
dian ; also the line between
ranges 15 and 16 west, of
the 6th principal meridian;
of township 8 north, State
of Nebraska.

P. W. HITCHCOCK, Surveyor General.

SURVEYOR GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Plattsmouth, Nebraska, August 27, 1867.

B.- The United States in account with the office of the surveyor general of Iowa and Nebraska, on account of salaries and incidental expenses for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1867.

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CR. By appropriation approved March 2, 1867, for compensation of surveyor general and clerks

7,000 00

Unexpended June 30, 1867....

6, 296 90

INCIDENTAL EXPENSE ACCOUNT,

DR. For expenditures during second quarter, 1867.

$625 54

CR. By appropriation approved March 2, 1867, for office rent, fuel, books, stationery, &c.......

2,000 00 Unexpended June 30, 1867

1,374 46

P. W. HITCHCOCK, Surveyor General. SURVEYOR GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Plattsmouth, Nebraska, August 27, 1867,

C.-Estimates of sums required for the extension of surveys in the State of

Nebraska, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1869.

Surveys estimated.

Miles.

Rate.

Cost.

For running the second guide meridian west from the fourth

standard parallel to the seventh standard parallel north. The fifth and sixth standard parallels from the first to the second guide meridian west. The fourth and fifth guide meridians west, from the base line to the second standard parallel. The first standard parallel from the third to the fifth guide meridians west. The sixth and seventh guide meridians west, from the third standard parallel to the fourth standard parallel. The third and fourth standard parallels, from the fifth to the seventh

guide meridians west. For running the exterior township lines of townships 13 to 16,

inclusive, of ranges 9 to 16 west, inclusive; township 13 to 16, inclusive, of ranges 17 to 24, inclusive; townships 9 to 16, in

clusive, of ranges 25 to 40 west, inclusive.. For the section lines in township 5 of ranges 22 to 24, inclusive;

townships 1 to 4, inclusive, of ranges 17 to 24, inclusive; townships 9 to 16, inclusive, of ranges 25 to 40, inclusive ; townships 13 to 16, inclusive, of ranges 9 to 24, inclusive..

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Total

85, 332

P. W. HITCHCOCK, Surveyor General. SURVEYOR GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Plattsmouth, Nebraska, August 27, 1867.

1.- Estimate of sums required for office expenses for the fiscal year ending

June 30, 1869.
Salary of surveyor general.
Salary of chief clerk..

$2,000

1,600 Salary of principal draughtsman.

1,300 Salary of assistant draughtsman. Salary of accountant...

1,200

1,200 Salary of two copyists, at $1,100 each. Salary of one messenger.

2, 200

600 Office rent, fuel, and other incidental expenses.

2,000 Total....

12, 100

P. W. HITCHCOCK, Surveyor General, SURVEYOR GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Plattsmouth, Nebraska, August 27, 1867.

No. 18 D.

Surveyor GENERAL'S Office,

Leavenworth, Kansas, August 24, 1867. Sir: In accordance with your instructions of March 26, 1867, I herewith submit my annual report, in duplicate, showing the condition of surveys and the operation of the office in the district of Kansas and Nebraska during the year ending June 30, 1867 :

1. Names, duties, and salaries of persons employed in the office of the surveyor general during the year ending June 30, 1867.

2. Sums expended for salaries of surveyor general and clerks during the year ending June 30, 1867.

3. Expenditures of the office during the year ending June 30, 1867.

4. Amount of revenue tax paid by the surveyor general and clerks during the year ending June 30, 1867.

5. The extent and cost of surveys executed in Kansas during the year ending June 30, 1867. 6. The same in Nebraska.

7. Number and area of townships of which plats and descriptive lists have been transmitted to the department and local land offices during the year ending June 30, 1867, in Kansas

8 and 9. The same in Nebraska.

10. Estimated expense, number of miles, and character of work for which contracts have been entered into for surveys in Kansas, and chargeable to appropriations approved July 28, 1866, and March 2, 1867.

11. Estimate of sums required for the extension of surveys in the State of Kansas for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1869.

12. Estimate of sums required for office expenses for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1869.

CONDITION OF PUBLIC SURVEYS.

All surveys contracted for out of appropriation of April 7, 1866, have been completed. Six contracts have been entered into out of appropriations approved July 28, 1866, and March 2, 1867, for surveys in Kansas. In letting these contracts I have followed the instructions as set forth in your letters of September 6, 1866, and March 30, 1867. The appropriations under which the present surveys are being prosecuted having been reported to this office at an earlier day than usual, it was thought that deputies would have little or no trouble in completing their contracts within the time specified. The causes that will prevent this desired result are much the same as have been referred to in my annual reports heretofore, but in a more aggravated form. The deputies, as usual for the past few years, upon starting for the field were furnished with an order for an escort of soldiers, to be procured at the military post nearest the locality of their surveys. These orders have been of little or no avail, as the demand for troops on the plains is so great that it is almost impossible for the military authorities to furnish escorts to all parties in need of them.

Messrs. Diefendorf and Smith are the only deputies who have been able to procure an escort sufficient in numbers to prosecute their work without molestation. These deputies, when last heard from, were still in the field; but, as a portion of their work is so remote from military posts, it was thought if more escort were not furnished they would have to abandon it for the present.

Messrs. Armstrong and McClure are the only deputies who have been attacked by Indians, an account of which has been furnished you. Since the loss reported, these deputies have procured a new outfit, hired new assistants, and, with commendable energy, have again started for the field.

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