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acts grant ten sections (6,400 acres) of land for each mile of road to be built in compliance therewith. These lines are as follows:

First division of St. Paul, and Pacific railroad-from Stillwater, via St. Paul and St. Anthony, to the Western boundary of the State, near Big Stone lake, 220 miles. This road is completed and in operation from St. Paul to Lake Minnetonka, (fifteen miles west of Minneapolis,) twenty-five miles. A branch line of this road is completed, and cars running thereon to St. Cloud, seventy miles from St. Anthony and eighty miles from St. Paul.

Minnesota Valley railroad—from St. Paul up the valley of the Minnesota river to Mankato ; thence in a southwesterly direction to the Iowa line, in range 42 west; distance to State line 170 miles. Completed and in operation from St. Paul, 60 miles, and is being rapidly pushed forward.

The Minnesota Central railroad-a line from St. Paul and Minneapolis (junction at Mendota) running nearly due south, via Faribault and Owatonna, to the Iowa line; completed and in operation to Austin, 105 miles, where a junction is formed with the McGregor Western railway, giving all rail connection with the east and south via Prairie du Chien.

The Winona and St. Peter railroad—a line from Winona, via St. Peter, to the western boundary of the State, completed and cars running from Winona west 100 miles or more. The line when completed will be 250 miles long. It intersects the Minnesota Central at Owatonna.

The Southern Minnesota railroad—a line from La Crescent, through the southern tier of counties of the State, to the western boundary, completed and operated to Rushford, 30 miles; whole length of line, 250 miles.

Lake Superior and Mississippi railroada line from St. Paul to the head of Lake Superior, in Minnesota. The distance is about 150 miles. Thirty miles have been graded, starting at St. Paul, and work is now being vigorously prosecuted on the line.

Northern Pacific railroad—a line crossing the State from Lake Superior to the Red river. Engineers are now making a survey of the two trial lines for this road.

Hastings and Red River railroad-a line from Hastings thrJugh the counties of Dakota, Scott, Carver, McLeod, &c., to the western boundary of the State. The land grant to this road being of recent date, no portion of it is completed. Some twenty miles are graded, and no doubt several miles of iron will be laid the present season.

Winona Branch of St. Paul and Pacific railroadfrom St. Paul to Winona along the valley of the Mississippi river. This line has been surveyed, ten miles of the grading completed, and the company propose to build and equip the road at an early day. It is impossible to estimate the importance of this system of railroads to the present and future population of the State. These lines, amounting to over 2,000 miles, wholly within this State, are rapidly opening up some of the best lands to be found anywhere, by bringing them within reach of good markets. The railroad companies are pursuing a liberal policy towards immigrants, by offering liberal terms as to price and time of payments, their own prosperity being identical with that of the State. The facility which Minnesota has of sending her products to market is one, and not the least, of ber many advantages. The vast region to the northwest of Minnesota, the Saskatchewan district, estimated to comprise 368,000 square miles, must eventually find an outlet across this State to St. Paul or Lake Superior. A large proportion of this immense region, notwithstanding its high latitude, is capable of cultivation, and it is demonstrated that as far as the production of the cereals is concerned, it is unsurpassed by any portion of the world. The settlement of this region

cannot longer be postponed, and the importance to the State of its connection with the public thoroughfares of Minnesota cannot well be estimated too highly. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. NUTTING,

Surveyor General. Hon. Joseph S. WILSON,

Commissioner General Land Office, Washington, D. C.

No. 18 B.

SURVEYOR GENERAL's Office,

Yancton, Dakota Territory, August 19, 1867. SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the field and office work performed in this surveying district since the date of my last annual report, together with the usual statements relating thereto and marked A, B, and C.

SURVEYS. 1. The correction or line of 43° 30' north latitude has been extended west from Dakota river, in range 58, to the Missouri river in range 71, amounting to seventy-five miles, fifty-one chains and twenty links.

2. All the proper township and range lines north of the south boundary of township No. 95 to 101, north and west of the line between ranges 57 and 58 west to the Missouri river, amounting to four hundred and eighty miles, twenty-eight chains and seventeen links.

3. The following named 55 townships and fractional townships have been subdivided into sections, viz: Townships 101, 102, 103 and 104 north, of range 51; townships 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103 and 104, of range 52; townships 96, 97, 98, 99, and 100, of ranges 53, 54, 55, 56 and 57; township 100, of range 66; townships 98, 99 and 100, of range 67; townships 97, 98, 99 and 100, of range 68; townships 97, 98, 99 and 100, of range 69; townships 98, 99 and 100, of range 70; township No. 100, of range 71; and township 100, of range 72, all west of the fifth principal meridian, in the Territory of Dakota, amounting to three thousand and six miles, thirty-three chains and twentyeight links.

OFFICE WORK.

1. The field-notes of all the above described surveys have been carefully examined and approved.

2. A diagram has been made and the field-notes transcribed of the survey of the above described township lines and transmitted to the General Land Office.

3. The field-notes of the following named 55 townships have been protracted, triplicate maps of each one thereof constructed, and the maps filed and transmitted, as required by law, viz:-Townships 101, 102, 103 and 104, of range 51; townships 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103 and 104, of range 52; townships 96, 97, 98, 99 and 100, of ranges 53, 54, 55, 56, and 57; township 100, of range 66; townships 98, 99, and 100, of range 67; townships, 97, 98, 99, and 100, of range 68; townships 97, 98, 99, and 100, of range 69; townships 98, 99, and 100, of range 70; township 100, of range 71, and township 100, of range 72, all west of the fifth principal meridian, in the Territory of Dakota.

4. Transcripts have been prepared and transmitted of the entire field-notes of each of the fifty-five townships last above named, all of which have been carefully compared with the original, and each has been prefaced with an index diagram.

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5. Lists descriptive of the land and all the corners of the above named townships have been made, carefully compared with the original field-notes, certified, and transmitted to the local office at Vermillion.

6. A map of the Territory of Dakota has been constructed on a scale of sixteen miles to an inch and transmitted to the General Land Office.

7. The usual amount of miscellaneous business has been performed, such as preparing contracts and bonds, (in quadruplicate,) with instructions, and diagram: of the exterior boundaries of their surveys for the use of deputies, making out and recording their accounts and the accounts with the government; the general correspondence of the office and recording the same, together with other work, all of which occupies a large amount of time, but of which no regular or detailed statement can well be given.

MISCELLANEOUS. Out of the appropriation for surveys in the Territory of Dakota for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1868, I have contracted for surveys as follows:

1. With Horace J. Austin for subdividing six townships; he has completed his surveys and returned his field-notes to this office, which have been approved, platted and transcribedl.

2. With George N. Proppro for subdividing eight townships; he has completed his surveys, but has not returned his field-notes to this office.

3. With Moses K. Armstrong, for survey of standard townships and subdivisional lines in the vicinity of the Red River of the North, to the amount of five thousand dollars. He is in the field.

In my annual report of last year is set forth the wants of the Territory in relation to the surveys of public lands. What was then stated may be restated with additional force as applicable to the present fiscal year. I am clearly of the opinion that during this year the population of Dakota will be increased ten thousand by emigration. This opinion is based upon information already received from the Red River of the North, from that part of Dakota lying along the Platte river and south of the Black Hills, and statement of the local land officers in regard to the amount of land already taken by homestead and pre-emption this season in the valley of the Missouri river.

This amount of population, in connection with that already here, unlike the population of the mining Territories, which is transient and fluctuating, is permanent and abiding, composed almost entirely of people devoted to nothing but agriculture and mechanical pursuits, all of whom at once, upon entering the Territory, provide themselves with land sufficient for themselves and children, and make valuable improvements, for here they expect to make their homes and their graves.

No mining has yet been done in the Territory, consequently no floating or drifting population are invited to come; hence a greater quantity of surveyed lands are required for our population than for that above referred to in many other localities. Again, the want of timber in some parts of the Territory, and its abundance along the lakes and streams where prairie fires could not destroy its growth, seem to render it necessary that surveys should be kept further in advance of the population, that the first settlers may make good selections, than under other circumstances would be required.

The five thousand dollars appropriated by the last Congress for surveys at and along the Red River of the North, is being expended by Mr. Moses K. Armstrong, deputy surveyor, pursuant to your instructions of the 19th of April last. I am reliably informed that about five thousand dollars more will be required to extend the surveys in that locality sufficiently to meet the present wants of settlers in that vicinity, and this is rendered eminently so from the fact that the treaty of 1863, by which the United States became possessed of those lands,

gives to a large amount of the population of that distant region a quarter section of land, which they have the right to select in preference to other settlers. Hence it becomes necessary both for the half-breed, and other settlers that these lands, at least so far as they are occupied, be surveyed at the earliest possible day, and the five thousand dollars asked for will do no more than to accomplish the desired object.

Again, the settlements are far in advance of the surveys along the valley of the Missouri river from Fort Randall to Fort Sully, and such will be the fact when the ten thousand dollars of this fiscal year for surveys in the Missouri valley shall be exhausted.

Again, it is an established fact that in and around the Black Hills of Dakota there is a vast amount of pine timber of excellent quality, which is now so much needed for building material all over Dakota elsewhere, and this timber is not over two hundred miles from surveys already made. I would recommend that five thousand dollars be appropriated for the purpose of extending the surveys to the Black Hills, and, as far as that sum would reach, make survey of said timbered lands.

In view of the well established fact that there is a vast mine of mineral wealth in and around the Black Hills of Dakota, gold, silver, copper and coal, which would have been opened and worked this season but for military orders to the contrary, it would seem to be of the first importance to the government to make liberal appropriation for surveys in this locality.

I am informed that around Fort Laramie and all along the vicinity of the Union and Pacific railroad, where it is located on the soil of this Territory, there are now three thousand inhabitants, and by the commencement of the next fiscal year, at the present ratio, will have reached five thousand who now are and will continue asking for surveys in that locality.

For the reasons already stated in connection with the productive soil and salubrious climate of this Territory, containing an area of 256,900 square miles, with nearly as much arable land as the other seven Territories combined, I was induced to ask the amount of appropriation named in my annual estimate, which I have no doubt your judgment will approve, and Congress pass by your recommendation.

Papers accompanying and forming a part of this report:
A.-Estimates for the surveying service in this district.

B.-Abstract account of the incidental expenses of the surveyor general's office for the year ending June 30, 1867.

C.-Statement showing the number of townships surveyed in Dakota and area of land therein. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM TRIPP,

Surveyor General. Hon. Jos. S. Wilson,

Commissioner General Land Office, Washington, D. C.

A.-Estimate of appropriations required for continuing the public surveys

in the Territory of Dakota, for salaries of the surveyor general and the clerks in his office, (as per act of March 2, 1861,) and for the incidental ex

penses of the office, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1869. For survey of standard lines..

$2,000 00 For survey of township lines..

5,000 00 For subdividing forty townships

15, 000 00 Total for surveys....

22. 002 00 For incidental expenses of office...

$2,000 00

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For salary of surveyor general.
For salary of chief clerk..
For salary of principal draughtsman.
For salary of assistant draughtsman
For salary of two clerks...

Total for surveyor general and clerks

$2,000 00 1,600 00 1,300 00 1, 200 00 2, 200 00

8,300 00

WILLIAM TRIPP, Surveyor General. SURVEYOR GENERAL'S OFFICE, Yankton, D. T., August 19, 1867.

B.-Abstract statement of the incidental expenses of the surveyor general's office

for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1867. For the quarter ending September 30, 1866.

$366 05 For the quarter ending December 31, 1866.

378 55 For the quarter ending March 31, 1867

337 25 For the quarter ending June 30, 1867..

352 20 1, 434 05

WILLIAM TRIPP, Surveyor General. SURVEYOR GENERAL'S OFFICE, Yankton, D. T., August 19, 1867.

C.- List of townships surveyed in the Territory of Dakota from July 1, 1866,

to June 30, 1867.

Number.

Township.

Range.

Area.

16

1 101 north 2 96 north 3 97 north 4 98 north 5 99 north 6 100 north 7 101 north 8 96 north 9 97 north 10 98 north 11 99 north 12.100 north 13 96 north 14 97 north 15 98 north

99 north 17 100 north 18 96 north 19 97 north 20 98 north 21 99 north 22 | 100 north 23 96 north 24 97 north

98 north 99 north 100 north

96 north 29 97 north 30 98 north 31 99 north

51 west 52 west 52 west 52 west 52 west 52 west 52 west 53 west 53 west 53 west 53 west 53 west 54 west 54 west 54 west 54 west 54 west 55 west 55 west 55 west 55 west 55 west 56 west 56 west 56 west 56 west 56 west 57 west 57 west 57 west 57 west

22, 835, 10 22,973, 06 22,939.98 22, 886.90 22, 849,97 17,919. 15 23, 071.98 23, 025. 66 22, 870.67 23, 002.98 23, 003, 53 18, 246.51 23, 014.75 23,013, 58 22,992. 48 23, 007, 32 18, 392, 40 23, 400, 16 23, 298.86 23, 389.59 23, 353.54 18,787,32 22, 849. 15 23, 139.70 23, 098.10 23, 061.80 18, 201, 12 22,869.34 23, 219.47 22,814. 48 82,959.72

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