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B.-Statement of original Commissioner's and registers' plats made and copied,

with date of trunsmission to the General Land Office and the local land offices.

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Townships 125 and 126, range 39... St. Cload..
Township 127, range 37..
Township 130, range 38.
Township 127, range 39.
Township 130, range 39.
Township 125, range 40.

....do
Townships 121 and 127, range 40..
Townships 125 and 126, range 41. ....do.
Township 127, range 41.

....do. Township 115, range 36.

St. Peter. Township 116, range 36.

Greenleaf. Townships 114 and 115, range 37. St. Peter.. Townsbip 116, range 37.

Greenleaf Township 114, range 38.

St. Peter.. Township 115, range 38.

....do... Township 116, range 3e.

Greenleaf Township 115, range 39

St. Peter.. Township 116, range 39.

Greenleaf Townships 117, 118, and 119, range 39 ....do Township 120, range 39..

....do .... Township 116, range 40

....do. Township 117, range 40. Township 118, range 40

...do. Townships 119 and 120, range 40. ...do. Towoship 117, range 41.

....do ....... Township 118, range 41.

...do. Townships 119 and 120, range 41. ...do. Township 106, range 42.

St. Peter
Township 105, range 43.

Winnebago City:
Townships 105, 106, and 108, range 43.. St. Peter.
Townships 135 and 136, range 32.. St. Cloud..
Townships 135 and 136, range 33.
Townships 131 and 132. range 40. ..do
Townships 43 and 44, range 18. Taylor's Falls
Township 45, range 19..
Township 114, range 41.

St. Peter
Townships 109, 110, and 111, range 39 ......do.
Township 124 north, ranges 39 and 40.. St. Cloud.

Total......

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1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 2 1 1

1866
1 May 10, 1867
1 June 6, 1867
1 May 10, 1867
1 June 6, 1867
1 Sept, 15, 1867
2 Dec. 22, 1866
2 Sept. 15, 1866
1 Dec. 22, 1866
1 Aug. 23, 1866
1 Aug. 23, 1866
2 Aug. 23, 1866
1 Sept. 19, 1866
1 Jan. 9, 1867
1 Apr. 19, 1867
1 Sept. 19, 1866
1 Apr. 5, 1867
1 Apr. 5, 1867
3 Nov. 1, 1866
1 Nov. 30, 1866
1 Apr. 5, 1867
1 Jan. 9, 1867
1 Nov. 1, 1866
2 Nov. 30, 1866
1 Apr. 5, 1867
1 Jan. 9, 1867
2 Nov. 30, 1866
1 Oct. 24, 1866
1 Oct. 24, 1866
3 Oct. 24, 1866
2 Feb. 14, 1867
2 Mar. 12, 1867
2 June 15, 1867
2 Feb. 1, 1867
1 Feb. 14, 1867
1 Aug. 1, 1867
3 Aug. 21, 1867
2 Aug. 30, 1867

2 July 12, 1867 1 July 12, 1867 1 July 12, 1867 1 July 12, 1867 1 July 12, 1867 1 July 12, 1867 2 July 12, 1867 2 July 12, 1867

July 12, 1867 1 July 31, 1867 1 July 31, 1867 2 July 31, 1867 1 July 31, 1867 1 July 31, 1867 1 July 31, 1867 1 July 31, 1867 1 July 31, 1867 1 July 31, 1867 3 July 31, 1867 1 July 31, 1867 1 July 31, 1867 1 July 31, 1867 1 July 31, 1867 2 July 31, 1867 1 July 31, 1867 1 July 31, 1867 2 July 31, 1867 1 July 31, 1867 1 3 July 31, 1867

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146

L. NUTTING, Surveyor General.

SURVEYOR GENERAL'S OFFICE, St. Paul, September 9, 1867.

0.-Estimates of approprtiaton required for continuing the public surveys in

Minnesota for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1869.
For the establishment of 700 miles of township lines between the fifth and sixth

correction lines from the independent meridian to the third guide meridian.... For the subdivision of eighteen (18) townships between the independent meridian

$4,900 and the third guide meridian... For the subdivision of thirty (30) townships in the western and southwestern

8, 100 part of the State.....

12,000

25,000

For the incidental expenses of surveyor general's office, including office rent, mes

senger, fuel, stationery, &c...

2,000

27,000

L. NUTTING, Surveyor General. SURVEYOR GENERAL'S OFFICE, St. Paul, September 9, 1867.

D.-Estimate of appropriation required for the salaries of the surveyor general

anıl the regular clerks in his office for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1869. For the salary of surveyor general...... For the salary of chief clerk

$2,000 For the salary of chief draughtsman

1,500

1, 300 For the salary of assistant draughtsman

1,200 For the salary of transcribing clerk

1, 200 For the salary of transcribing elerk..

1, 100

8,300

L. NUTTING, Surveyor General. SURVEYOR GENERAL'S OFFICE, St. Paul, September 9, 1867.

E.-Abstract statement of the incidental expenses of the surveyor general's office

from June 30, 1866, to June 30, 1867. For quarter ending September 30, 1866

$535 80 For quarter ending December 31, 1866.

337 35 For quarter ending March 31, 1867.

320 85 For quarter ending June 30, 1867

308 63

1,502 63

L. NUTTING, Surveyor General. SURVEYOR GENERAL'S Office, St. Paul, September 9. 1867.

G-Statement of townships surveyed from the 1st day of July, 1866, to the 30th day of June, 1867.

Acres. 1. Township 126, range 39

22,414, 80 2. Township 127, range 37

21, 475, 72 3. Township 130, range 38

21, 207.45 4. Township 127, range 39

18,534.72 5. Township 130, range 39

19, 947.93 6. Township 125, range 40

22,772.28 7. Township 126, range 40

21, 601.04 8. Township 127, range 40

21,886, 19 9. Township 125, range 41

20,958,28 10. Township 126, range 41

21, 308.98 11. Township 127, range 41

22,915.84 12. Township 115, range 36

22,712, 14 13. Township 116, range 36

22,858. 19 Fractional township 114, range 37

10,358.07 14. Township 115, range 37

22, 893. 32 15. Township 116, range 37

22,931. 65 Fractional township 114, range 38

778.50 Fractional township 115, range 38

18,305, 49 16. Township 116, range 38

22, 875. 22 Fractional township 115, range 39.

2,595. 05 Fractional township 116, range 39

18, 391.35 17. Township 117, range 39

22,766. 47 18. Township 118, range 39

22,789.17 19. Township 119, range 39

22, 774. 25 20. Township 120, range 39

22, 850.88 Fractional township 116, range 40

2,331, 76 Fractional township 117, range 40

19, 853. 35 21. Township 118, range 40

22,769.80 22. Township 119, range 40

22, 645.78 23. Township 120, range 40

22,814.53 Fractional township 117, range 41.

5, 632, 45 Fractional township 118, range 41

21, 205,70 24. Township 119, range 41

22,752.70

25. Township 120, range 41 26. Township 106, range 42 27. Township 105, range 43 28. Township 106, range 43 29. Township 107, range 43 30. Township 108, range 43 31. Township 135, range 32 32. Township 136, range 32 33. Township 135, range 33 34. Township 136, range 33 35. Township 131, range 40 36. Township 132, range 40 37. Township 43, range 18 38. Township 44, range 18 39. Township 45, range 19 1, 118 previously reported....

Total acres surveyed.....

Acres. 22,973.75 22, 831.01 22,975, 57 23,006, 21 23,023.75 22, 431.56 22,707.34 22,798.83 22,469.89 22, 424. 45 21,886.67 19,569.60 22,976. 12 23, 041. 42

19,818.95 21,923, 872.38

21,879,715.70

L. NUTTING, Surveyor General. SURVEYOR GENERAL'S OFFICE, St. Paul, September 9, 1867.

No. 18 A-(Supplement.)
SURVEYOR General's Office,

St. Paul, Minn., October 8, 1867. Sir: In compliance with the request contained in your letter of September 14, I have the honor to submit the following supplemental report,“ presenting results as to the material interests of the State, her resources, agricultural, mineral," &c.

AGRICULTURAL CAPACITY.

Many persons in the eastern and middle States regard Minnesota as too cold a region for successful agricultural purposes, but it is believed that there are few districts in this country that can equal this State in that respect. The prevailing soil is a dark sandy loam, with a clay subsoil or underlaid with limestone. The depth of this dark rich loam varies from two to four feet, and this fact enables it to support vegetation during droughts that, in less favored localities, prove disastrous to crops, and also prevents injury during wet seasons on account of the facility with which it drains. Another important feature of the soil of Minnesota is that its earthy materials are finely pulverized and the soil is light and mellow, existing naturally in the condition reached by soils less favorably constituted by expensive under-drainage.

The following table will show about the average yield, per acre, of a few of the staple products of Minnesota : Wheat, bushels per acre...

22.05 Rye, bushels per acre...

21.56 Barley, bushels per acre.

33.23 Oats, busbels per acre......

43 00 Corn, bushels per acre.

35.67 Potatoes, bushels per acre.

208.00 Sorghum, gallons of sirup per acre

100 00 Hay, tons per acre..

2.12 The above is collated from the census of 1860, and gives only the average yield of the crops mentioned for the whole State, and may be taken as a fair sample of the average, one year with another. With thorough cultivation the yield is often much greater than the above figures. In 1865, from 400,000

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acres of wheat there was harvested 10,000,000 bushels, an average of 25 bushels to the acre.

Wheat is, and no doubt will continue to be, the leading agricultural staple of this State, owing to the large yield, superior quality, and comparative exemption from the dangers to which it is exposed in other States, by drought, rust, insects, &c.

The largest known growth of other States, as compared with the average of Minnesota, is as follows: Minnesota, 1860, bushels per acre..

22.00 Ohio, 1850, bushels per acre

17.03 Michigan, 1848, bushels.per acre..

19.00 The average corn yield in Minnesota in 1859 (a bad year) was 26 bushels ; 1860, 354 bushels; 1865, 431 bushels ; average about 35 bushels. A larger average than in Ohio, Illinois, Iowa, or Kentucky, for the three years taken together

It seems to be established beyond question that Minnesota is far ahead of any State east of the Rocky mountains, in its capacity for wheat production, and equal to most as a corn producing State.

Oats, rye, barley, and buckwheat all do remarkably well. And no better potatoes are grown anywhere, and a large market is found for them in all the States below.

MANUFACTURING FACILITIES. Minnesota possesses a more ample and effective water-power than any other State in the Union. The falls and rapids of St. Anthony, with a total descent of sixty-four feet, affords an available hydraulic capacity greater, it is believed, than any single water-power in the world.

The St. Croix falls, at the head of navigation on the St. Croix river, and the falls of the St. Louis river, at a point intersected by the Lake Superior and Mississippi railroad, are only second in power to the falls of St. Anthony. The Mississippi, in its descent from Itasca lake to the mouth of the Minnesota, has a fall of 836 feet, characterized by long stretches of slack water, and then broken by falls and rapids available for hydraulic works. The principal of these, aside from St. Anthony falls, are Pokegama falls, Little falls, and Sauk rapids.

In addition to these, there are a great number of streams, such as the Elk, Rum, Sauk, Crow, Vermillion, Zumbro, Cannon, Root, Cedar, Blue Earth, Chippewa, &c., which afford an abundance of available water-power to nearly every county in the State. Manufactories are springing up all over the State. In 1860 there were 511 establishments, producing four and a half millions worth of manufactures. Now the number of establishments is estimated at 2,000, producing from sixteen to eighteen million dollars worth of manufactures. Such a combination of agriculture and manufacture as is found in Minnesota is very unusual; generally, where one feature is present the other is absent; but here both exist with all their advantages.

MINERAL RESOURCES.

The mineral deposits of Minnesota, although but little developed, it is believed, will prove another important source of wealth. In the northern part of the State copper and iron ores of superior quality are found. The copper mines on the north shore of Lake Superior are rich and extensive, and fine specimens of this ore have been obtained on Stuart and Knife rivers. Thick deposits of iron ore are found in various localities in the northeastern part of the State and on the Upper Mississippi, near Pokegama lake, said to be equal to the famous Swedish and Russian iron.

A geological survey, made under the auspices of the State in 1865, disclosed the existence of the precious metals on the shores of Vermillion lake. Scientific analysis attested the presence of gold and silver in the quartz surface rock in sufficient quantities to induce the employment of capital and labor in their extraction, and a number of stock companies have been formed and repaired to that place in search of gold. Whether the search will prove as successful as anticipated time will determine.

Slate in immense quantities is known to exist on the St. Louis river, equal in quality to any in this country for roofing and other purposes.

Unlimited quantities of pipe-stone are found in the southwestern part of the State, and also on the St. Louis river. This is a kind of stone that is very soft and easily worked when first quarried, becoming hard on exposure to the air for a short time, and capable of receiving a high polish, and will, no doubt, be extensively used for mantels, table-tops, vases, &c.

But the richest mines of wealth a State can have or wish for are a productive soil and healthy climate; and in these respects Minnesota is not excelled by any.

FORESTS. The impression seems to prevail among many not acquainted with the State that Minnesota is a prairie country, nearly destitute of timber. This is a great mistake. There is no western State better supplied with forests. To say nothing now of the pine region, there is what is known here as the “Big Woods," about one hundred miles in length and from thirty to forty in width, running nearly north and south through the central part of the State; and nearly all the lakes and streams are fringed with woodland, and groves of timber are scattered throughout the State at short intervals. Oak, ash, maple, hickory, basswood, elm, butternut, and cottonwood are the prevailing varieties.

PINERIES. The vast pine forests in the northern part of the State extend from Lake Su. perior to Red lake, and as far south as latitude 46°. The principal pineries where lumber is at present obtained are on the head-waters of the Mississippi and the St. Croix and their tributaries, viz., Kettle, Snake, Rum, Crow Wing, &c.

These pine forests, being almost inexhaustible, will constitute a vast source of wealth for generations to come. In 1866 the amount of logs and lumber cut and manufactured was about 175,000,000 feet; this year the amount will be still greater.

When it is considered that no pine is found west of these vast forests in Minnesota until the Black Hills in the western part of Dakota Territory are reached, their value and importance cannot be overestimated.

FACILITIES FOR EXTERNAL AND INTERNAL COMMUNICATION. The steamboat business of Minnesota is, as yet, confined to the Mississippi, the Minnesota, and St. Croix rivers. The Northwestern Union Packet Company own eleven first-class packets, twenty stern-wheel steamers, and from one hundred and thirty to one hundred and forty barges, and employ over two thousand men. Their boats ply between Dubuque and St. Paul, and between La Crosse and St. Paul. This company has also regular lines on the St. Croix and Minnesota rivers for passengers and freight. The Northern Line, plying between St. Louis and St. Paul, consists of nine or ten first-class side-wheel packets, eight stern-wheel steamers and sixty or more barges. A boat leaves St. Louis and St. Paul daily.

RAILROAD SYSTEM. In 1857 Congress made a land grant of four and a half million acres to Minnesota for railroad purposes. In 1864 an additional grant was made. These

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