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Michigan, eastern district.....
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Mississippi, southern district
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Ohio, southern district.
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$36, 411 76 17,512 79 17,364 00 3, 007 00 7, 915 25 37, 000 00 13, 289 68 14, 168 48 18, 863 00

5,861 00 28, 989 77 102, 600 00 57,000 00 21, 589 00

6,000 00 42, 340 00 40, 838 00

3, 222 00 33, 905 00 27, 060 00

8,230 00 21, 877 00 8, 221 86 2, 616 00 16, 195 00 20, 335 00 11, 844 00 5. 723 00

8,081 79 9, 653 02 10, 000 00 5, 632 00 9, 564 95 10, 278 00

6, 000 00 11,936 15, 000 00

1, 203, 214 74

the same period, was one hundred and forty-six thousand nine hundred and forty-five dollars and twenty-nine cents, (8146,945 29;) to United States com. missioners, fifty thousand six hundred and forty-three dollars and fifty fire cents.(3.30,643 55;) to clerks of the courts of the United States, seventy thon. sand eight hundred and ninety-fire dollars and twenty-five cents, ($70,895 25;) and for miscellaneous expenditures one hundred and fifty-seven thousand, eight hundred and thirty-seven dollars and sixty-seven cents ($157,837 67.) Of this sum, sixty-six thousand and ninety-two dollars and ninety-seven cents, ($66,092 97) were paid for rent of buildings for the accommodation of the courts and their officers.

By an act of Congress approved May 12, 1864, the Secretary of the Interior was authorized to designate some suitable prison or penitentiary, and to contract with the authorities thereof for the confinement of persons convicted of crime, the punishment whereof is imprisonment, and sentenced by the courts of the United States in a district or territory where, at the time of such conviction, there should be no suitable prison or penitentiary. Under the authority so conferred my predecessor made contracts with the House of Correction at Detroit, and the Iowa State penitentiary, for the subsistence and employment of all convicts sentenced by the courts of the United States for the several Territories to imprisonment at hard labor. The former institution receives under the contract only such whose term of sentence was two or more years. Prisoners have been sent to these prisons from the Territories of Colorado, Nebraska and Montana. The act further provides that if in the opinion of the Secretary of the Interior the expense of transportation will exceed that of maintaining the convicts in jail in the Territory during the period of their sentence, it shall be lawful so to confine them. None have been sent from any of the other Territories, as, in the opinion of my predecessors, in which I concur, the expense of their transportation would far exceed the cost of maintaining them in jails in the Territories.

An act entitled “ An act setting aside certain proceeds from internal revenue for the erection of penitentiaries in the Territories of Nebraska, Washington, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Arizona, and Dakota,” approved January 22, 1867, appropriated the net proceeds of the internal revenue of said Territories for the fiscal year ending the 30th of June, 1866, and the two succeeding years, for the purpose of erecting, under the direction of the Secretary of the Interior, penitentiary buildings in said Territories, at such place therein as had been or might be designated by the legislatures thereof and approved by him. The amount to be expended therefor was not to exceed twenty thousand dollars ($20,000) in Washington Territory, nor forty thousand dollars ($40,000) in either of the other Territories. The attention of the governors of these Territories was invited to the subject, and they were requested, when the territorial legislatures had passed an act designating the place for the erection of such penitentiaries, to transmit a duly certified copy thereof to this department. Advices have been received only from Washington and Montana. · The ninth section of an act to enable the people of Nebraska to form a constitution and State governnfent, and for the admission of said State into the Union on an equal footing with the original States, approved April 19, 1864, (Statutes at Large, volume 13, page 47,) provides that fifty entire sections of land, to be selected and located by direction of the legislature thereof, on or before the first day of January, 1868, should be, and they were thereby, granted

to the State of Nebraska on her admission into the Union, in accordance with certain provisions of that act, for the purpose of erecting a suitable building for a penitentiary or State prison, in such manter as the legislature shall prescribe. The State was not admitted under that act. An act entitled “ An act for the admission of the State of Nebraska," passed February 9, 1967, declares the State of Nebraska to be entitled to the rights, privileges, grants, and immunities, and subject to all the conditions and restrictions of said act of April 19, 1864. The proclamation of the President contemplated in the third seetion of the act of 1867 was issued March 1, 1967. Nebraska, on her admission to the Union, was entitled to the grant of lands for the specific purpose of erecting a State prison. Her admission occurring after the passage of the act of January 22, 1867, changed entirely her pre-existing relations with the United States. That act regarded her only as a Territory, and did not authorize the building of a penitentiary within the limits of a State.

I have been informed by the Secretary of the Treasury that the entire amount appropriated for building these penitentiaries in Washington, Colorado, Montana, and probably Idaho, has been received and is available for that purpose. In Arizona and Dakota the revenue is inconsiderable, and the expense of collecting it so nearly exhausts the receipts that at the date of the Secretary's cominunication there was no available balance that could be applied to this purpose.

The legislature of Washington passed an act designating certain persons therein named, as a board of commissioners to superintend the erection of the penitentiary at such place as they might select in the county of Pierce, at or near the town of Steilacoom. By this act the entire control of the building is assumed by the Territory. It provides for the appointment of a person to saperintend its erection, and authorizes the employment of the territorial convicts thereon, and for the payment into the treasury of the Territory of such sum from the penitentiary fund as their labor may be worth. The legislature seems not to have been fully aware of the provisions of the act of Congress. The latter makes it the duty of the Secretary of the Interior to approve the site, and provides that the buildings shall be constructed under his direction. No nction can, therefore, under existing circumstances, be taken in the premises by the department. It is presumed that the legislature will amend its legislation so as to make it conforın to that of Congress.

An act has been passed by the legislature of Montana locating the penitentiary at Argenta, and appointing commissioners to select a suitable site for said penitentiary at that place. The commissioners have performed that duty, and have made a report thereof to this department. At an early day steps will be taken to have the building erected in accordance will the provisions of the act of Congress.

The Warden of the District Jail reports that on the 1st of November there were in his custody one hundred and thirteen prisoners, of whom forty-three were white and seventy colored. During the year preceding that date, twelve hun. dred and forty-one persons were committed, seventy-nine of whom were convicted and sentenced to imprisonment at Albany. The present officers consist of a warden and fourteen guards. The expense of the jail for said year, including the cost of transporting prisoners to the penitentiary at Albany, was thirty thou. sand seven hundred and thirty-six dollars and forty-eight cents, ($30,736 48.)

Pursuant to the requirements of a joint resolution, approved March 2, 1867, I examined the public grounds deemed available for the purpose, and selected as a site for a new jail in the District the parcel of land known as reservation, numbered seventeen, situated at the intersection of New Jersey and Virginia avenues, in the city of Washington. The "perfected plans" of the building were approved by a board of disinterested and competent engineers and architects, and public notice of the “letting of the contract" was given in the mode prescribed by law. After a careful consideration of the proposals, I accepted such as offered the best terms to the government. The contractors have executed bonds with acceptable security, conditioned for the faithful performance of their engagements, and I trust that the work may, without interruption, be prosecuted to an early completion.

Congress, at its last session, made no provision for the flouse of Correction for this District. Of the twelve thousand dollars ($12,000) appropriated at the preceding session, eight thousand dollars have been paid t) the treasurer. Five thousand five hundred and five dollars and fifty-three cents ($5,505 53) have been expended by him upon the order of the trustees in repairing and furnishing the temporary building upon the government farm, in an attempt to render it fit for the reception and detention, for the time being, of juvenile offenders. One thousand four hundred and fifty-seven dollars ($1,457) have been spent in the employment of a watchman and for other purposes, of which the report of the board does not furnish specific information. The trustees are of opinion that the building now occupied cannot be adapted to any permanent use. For the erection of one such as is required, they suggest that an appropriation of one hundred thousand dollars ($100,000) is necessary, and they request an additional appropriation of twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000) to meet the eurrent expenses of the institution. They have furnished no detailed estimate, and I submit the subject for consideration.

I earnestly invite attention to the views expressed in the last annual report of this department, touching the law directing the imprisonment of juvenile offenders sentenced by the federal courts. A modification of its provisions is indispensable to give it practical effect in many parts of the country.

The Metropolitan Police force consists of 238 men, of whom six are detectives. They made 20,075 arrests during the past year, 3,783 of which were of females, and 6,136 were of colored persons; 13,224 of the alleged offences were against the person, and 6,851 against property; 12,167 of those arrested were unmarried, and 7,373 could neither read nor write ;-971 were committed to jail; 334 gave bail for appearance at court; 200 were turned over to the military ; 6,330 were dismissed; 1,967 were sent to the work-house; and 576 gave bonds to keep the peace. In 569 cases, various light punishments were inflicted; fines, to the amount of $38,098 45, were imposed in 9.128 cases. 184 lost children were sent home; 3,473 destitate persons were furnished with temporary lodgings, and 131 were assisted or taken to the hospital. The dective force made 462 arrests; recovered stolen or lost property to the amount of $15,691 40, and performed

other labors, which do not admit of record. The sanitary company of the police have been actively employed, and with evident advantage to the health of the city.

This department suggested, in the last annual report, the expediency of creating a court for the trial of offences of a minor grade, and the subject is again presented for consideration.

During the year ending 30th of June, 1867, there were admitted to the Government IIospital for the Insane one hundred and nine patients, of whom eightyeight were males. The whole number under treatment was three hundred and ninety, of whom two hundred and seventy-three were males. The number discharged was seventy-seven, of whom sixty-six were males. The number of deaths was thirty-three, of whom nineteen were males. The whole number under treatment at the close of the fiscal year was two hundred and eighty, of whom one hundred and eighty-eight were males. More than half of these were from civil life. There have been two thousand three hundred and fifteen persons treated since the institution was opened, one thousand and sixty-four of whom were natives. The receipts during the past year amounted to one hundred and one thousand eight hundred and seventy-one dollars and ninety-five cents, ($101,871 95,) and at its close there was a balance of two thousand four hundred and thirty six dollars and sixty-nine cents (82,436 69) in the hands of the superintendent. Congress will, no doubt, cheerfully make the usual allowance for the support of the hospital. I recommend that an additional appropriation, for which an estimate has been submitted, be made for furnishing, lighting, and heating the unfinished part of the east wing of the main edifice, and for the purchase of land contiguous to the present grounds. The report of the board of visitors contains many interesting tables and an elaborate discussion of the proper treatment of persons afflicted with a peculiar form of insanity, of whom an unusually large number was admitted during the past year.

I have heretofore expressed my opinion of the admirable manner in which this institution has been conducted. Its present condition reflects the highest credit upon the accomplished superintendent and those associated with him in the administration of its affairs.

The Columbian Institute for the Deaf and Dumb is a private corporation. I referred to its history and its relation to the government in my last annual report. I respectfully invite attention to the views which I then had the honor to submit.

In addition to the payment of the charges for the education and maintenance of the pupils entitled to adınission on the order of the Secretary of the Interior, Congress has advanced to this institution the sum of two hundred and sixty-four thousand and forty dollars and eighty-seven cents, (8264,040 87.) There are now twenty-three pupils truin the District of Columbia, and three who are the children of persons in the military service of the United States. By the acts of February 16, 1857, and May 29, 1555, Congress agreed to pay annually one hundred and fifty dollars (8150, for the maintenance of each of such pupils. The directors requested an appropriation in gross for the support of the institution, instead of the payment for such papilt per capita. The ..ct allowing such

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